Reinventing Evidence in Social Inquiry

Decoding Facts and Variables

Author: R. Biernacki

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137007281

Category: Social Science

Page: 199

View: 5892

Revisiting the dominant scientific method, 'coding,' with which investigators from sociology to literary criticism have sampled texts and catalogued their cultural messages, the author demonstrates that the celebrated hard outputs rest on misleading samples and on unfeasible classifying of the texts' meanings.

Culture in Networks

Author: Paul McLean

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0745687202

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 9508

Today, interest in networks is growing by leaps and bounds, in both scientific discourse and popular culture. Networks are thought to be everywhere ï¿1⁄2 from the architecture of our brains to global transportation systems. And networks are especially ubiquitous in the social world: they provide us with social support, account for the emergence of new trends and markets, and foster social protest, among other functions. Besides, who among us is not familiar with Facebook, Twitter, or, for that matter, World of Warcraft, among the myriad emerging forms of network-based virtual social interaction? It is common to think of networks simply in structural terms ï¿1⁄2 the architecture of connections among objects, or the circuitry of a system. But social networks in particular are thoroughly interwoven with cultural things, in the form of tastes, norms, cultural products, styles of communication, and much more. What exactly flows through the circuitry of social networks? How are peopleï¿1⁄2s identities and cultural practices shaped by network structures? And, conversely, how do peopleï¿1⁄2s identities, their beliefs about the social world, and the kinds of messages they send affect the network structures they create? This book is designed to help readers think about how and when culture and social networks systematically penetrate one another, helping to shape each other in significant ways.

Handbook of Science and Technology Studies

Author: Sheila Jasanoff,Gerald E Markle,James C Peterson,Trevor Pinch

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1452213631

Category: Social Science

Page: 848

View: 8072

For the most current, comprehensive resource in this rapidly evolving field, look no further than the Revised Edition of the Handbook of Science and Technology Studies. This masterful volume is the first resource in more than 15 years to define, summarize, and synthesize this complex multidisciplinary, international field. Tightly edited with contributions by an internationally recognized team of leading scholars, this volume addresses the crucial contemporary issues—both traditional and nonconventional—social studies, political studies, and humanistic studies in this changing field. Containing theoretical essays, extensive literature reviews, and detailed case studies, this remarkable volume clearly sets the standard for the field. It does nothing less than establish itself as the benchmark, one that will carry the field well into the next century.

Distinction

A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste

Author: Pierre Bourdieu

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113587316X

Category: Philosophy

Page: 640

View: 7995

No judgement of taste is innocent - we are all snobs. Pierre Bourdieu's Distinction brilliantly illuminates the social pretentions of the middle classes in the modern world, focusing on the tastes and preferences of the French bourgeoisie. First published in 1979, the book is at once a vast ethnography of contemporary France and a dissection of the bourgeois mind. In the course of everyday life we constantly choose between what we find aesthetically pleasing, and what we consider tacky, merely trendy, or ugly. Taste is not pure. Bourdieu demonstrates that our different aesth

Rethinking Culture

Embodied Cognition and the Origin of Culture in Organizations

Author: David G. White

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1315454963

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 332

View: 8070

Organizational or corporate "culture" is the most overused and least understood word in business, if not society. While the topic has been an object of keen academic interest for nearly half a century, theorists and practitioners still struggle with the most basic questions: What is organizational culture? Can it be measured? Is it a dependent or independent variable? Is it causal in organizational performance, and if so, how? Paradoxically, managers and practitioners challenge cultural explanations for much of what constitutes organizational behavior in organizations, and, moreover, believe culture can be engineered to their own designs for positive business outcomes. What explains this divide between research and practice? While much academic research on culture is challenged by ontological, epistemic and ethical difficulties, there is little empirical evidence to show culture can be deliberately shaped beyond espoused values, the gap between research and practice can be explained by one simple reason: the science of culture has yet to catch up to managerial intuition. Managers are correct in suspecting culture is a powerful normative force, but, until now, current theory and research is not able to adequately account for cultural behavior in organizations. Rethinking Culture describes and presents evidence for a new paradigm of organizational culture. It will be of relevance to academics and researchers with an interest in business and management, organizational culture, and organizational change, as well as cognitive and cultural anthropologists and sociologists interested in applications of theory in organizational and institutional settings.

Social Science Research

From Field to Desk

Author: Barbara Czarniawska

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 147390532X

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 4933

This clear, straightforward textbook embraces the practical reality of actually doing fieldwork. It tackles the common problems faced by new researchers head on, offering sensible advice and instructive case studies from the author’s own experience. Barbara Czarniawska takes us on a master class through the research process, encouraging us to revisit the various facets of the fieldwork research and helping us to reframe our own experiences. Combining a conversational style of writing with an impressive range of empirical examples she takes the reader from planning and designing research to collecting and analyzing data all the way to writing up and disseminating findings. This is a sophisticated introduction to a broad range of research methods and methodologies; it will be of great interest to anyone keen to revisit social research in the company of an expert guide.

The Fabrication of Labor

Germany and Britain, 1640-1914

Author: Richard Biernacki

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520084919

Category: History

Page: 569

View: 9209

"In this exemplary piece of historical sociology, Biernacki demonstrates tremendous theoretical and methodological sophistication as well as the talents of a gifted social historian. He skillfully weaves together theory and history to creatively address central debates in the social sciences."--Ronald Aminzade, author of "Ballots and Barricades: Class Formation and Republican Politics in France, 1830-1871" "A work of major significance in comparative-historical sociology, the sociology of culture, labor history, sociological theory, and the history of economic thought. It is in a class by itself."--Sonya O. Rose, author of "Limited Livelihoods: Gender and Class in Nineteenth-Century England" "A major intellectual event in cultural sociology and labor history. Biernacki's theoretical and methodological sophistication, his lucid style, and his wonderfully detailed empirical research make this book very special."--William Sewell, Jr., author of "Work and Revolution in France"

An Anthropology of Biomedicine

Author: Margaret Lock,Vinh-Kim Nguyen

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1119069130

Category: Medical

Page: 560

View: 8906

"Edition History: Margaret Lock and Vinh-Kim Nguyen (1e, 2010) published by Blackwell Ltd."--T.p. verso.

Touring Cultures

Transformations of Travel and Theory

Author: Chris Rojek,John Urry

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134833733

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 6275

It is becoming ever clearer that while people tour cultures, cultures and objects themselves are in a constant state of migration. This collection brings together some of the most influential writers in the field to examine the complex connections between tourism and cultural change and the relevance of tourist experience to current theoretical debates on space, time and identity.

Processual Sociology

Author: Andrew Abbott

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022633676X

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 1453

For the past twenty years, noted sociologist Andrew Abbott has been developing what he calls a processual ontology for social life. In this view, the social world is constantly changing—making, remaking, and unmaking itself, instant by instant. He argues that even the units of the social world—both individuals and entities—must be explained by these series of events rather than as enduring objects, fixed in time. This radical concept, which lies at the heart of the Chicago School of Sociology, provides a means for the disciplines of history and sociology to interact with and reflect on each other. In Processual Sociology, Abbott first examines the endurance of individuals and social groups through time and then goes on to consider the question of what this means for human nature. He looks at different approaches to the passing of social time and determination, all while examining the goal of social existence, weighing the concepts of individual outcome and social order. Abbott concludes by discussing core difficulties of the practice of social science as a moral activity, arguing that it is inescapably moral and therefore we must develop normative theories more sophisticated than our current naively political normativism. Ranging broadly across disciplines and methodologies, Processual Sociology breaks new ground in its search for conceptual foundations of a rigorously processual account of social life.

How to Do Media and Cultural Studies

Author: Jane Stokes

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1446271706

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 6639

The Second Edition of this student favourite takes readers step-by-step through the theories, processes and methods of each stage of research, from how to create a research question to designing the project and writing it up. It gives students a clear sense of how their own work relates to broader scholarship and inspires understanding of why studying the media matters. Now 20% bigger, new features include: • Brand new chapters on the how and why of researching media and culture • All new case studies spotlighting the international media landscape • Online readings showing how methods get used in real research • Essential new material on ethnography, digital content analysis, online surveys and researching blogs. Perfect for students of all ranges, How to Do Media and Cultural Studies continues to provide the clearest and most accessible guide to media and cultural studies as students embark on their own research.

The Good Research Guide

Author: Martyn Denscombe

Publisher: McGraw-Hill International

ISBN: 0335220223

Category: Study Aids

Page: 349

View: 3136

As a best-selling introductory book on the basics of social research, The Good Research Guide provides an accessible yet comprehensive introduction to the main approaches to social research and the methods most commonly used by researchers in the social sciences. This edition has been updated to account for recent developments in the field such as: The emergence of mixed methods approaches Increased use of internet research More frequent use of methods such as triangulation and focus groups Developments in research ethics Written for anyone undertaking a small-scale research project, either as part of an academic course or as part of their professional development, this book provides: A clear, straightforward introduction to data collection methods and data analysis Explanations of the key decisions researchers need to take, with practical advice on how to make appropriate decisions Essential checklists to guide good practice This book is perfect for the first-time researcher looking for guidance on the issues they should consider and traps they should avoid when embarking on a social research project.

Communities of Play

Emergent Cultures in Multiplayer Games and Virtual Worlds

Author: Celia Pearce

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262291541

Category: Computers

Page: 344

View: 8460

The odyssey of a group of “refugees” from a closed-down online game and an exploration of emergent fan cultures in virtual worlds. Play communities existed long before massively multiplayer online games; they have ranged from bridge clubs to sports leagues, from tabletop role-playing games to Civil War reenactments. With the emergence of digital networks, however, new varieties of adult play communities have appeared, most notably within online games and virtual worlds. Players in these networked worlds sometimes develop a sense of community that transcends the game itself. In Communities of Play, game researcher and designer Celia Pearce explores emergent fan cultures in networked digital worlds—actions by players that do not coincide with the intentions of the game's designers. Pearce looks in particular at the Uru Diaspora—a group of players whose game, Uru: Ages Beyond Myst, closed. These players (primarily baby boomers) immigrated into other worlds, self-identifying as “refugees”; relocated in There.com, they created a hybrid culture integrating aspects of their old world. Ostracized at first, they became community leaders. Pearce analyzes the properties of virtual worlds and looks at the ways design affects emergent behavior. She discusses the methodologies for studying online games, including a personal account of the sometimes messy process of ethnography. Pearce considers the “play turn” in culture and the advent of a participatory global playground enabled by networked digital games every bit as communal as the global village Marshall McLuhan saw united by television. Countering the ludological definition of play as unproductive and pointing to the long history of pre-digital play practices, Pearce argues that play can be a prelude to creativity.

Philosophy of Anthropology and Sociology

A Volume in the Handbook of the Philosophy of Science Series

Author: N.A

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 0080466648

Category: Philosophy

Page: 900

View: 8054

This volume concerns philosophical issues that arise from the practice of anthropology and sociology. The essays cover a wide range of issues, including traditional questions in the philosophy of social science as well as those specific to these disciplines. Authors attend to the historical development of the current debates and set the stage for future work. · Comprehensive survey of philosophical issues in anthropology and sociology · Historical discussion of important debates · Applications to current research in anthropology and sociology

Iconic Power

Materiality and Meaning in Social Life

Author: J. Alexander,D. Bartmanski,B. Giesen,Dominik Bartma?ski

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137012862

Category: Social Science

Page: 262

View: 5637

A collection of original articles that explore social aspects of the phenomenon of icon. Having experienced the benefits and realized the limitations of so called 'linguistic turn', sociology has recently acknowledged a need to further expand its horizons.

Educating Everybody's Children

Diverse Teaching Strategies for Diverse Learners, Revised and Expanded 2nd Edition

Author: Robert W. Cole

Publisher: ASCD

ISBN: 1416612491

Category: Education

Page: 295

View: 333

Designed to promote reflection, discussion, and action among the entire learning community, Educating Everybody's Children encapsulates what research has revealed about successfully addressing the needs of students from economically, ethnically, culturally, and linguistically diverse groups and identifies a wide range of effective principles and instructional strategies. Although good teaching works well with all students, educators must develop an extensive repertoire of instructional tools to meet the varying needs of students from diverse backgrounds. Those tools and the knowledge base behind them are the foundation of this expanded and revised second edition of Educating Everybody's Children. Each strategy discussed in the book includes classroom examples and a list of the research studies that support it. The most important thing we have learned as a result of the education reform movement is that student achievement stands or falls on the motivation and skills of teachers. We must ensure that all teachers are capable of delivering a standards?based curriculum that describes what students should know and be able to do, and that these standards are delivered by means of a rich and engaging "pedagogy of plenty." By these two acts we can ensure that all schools will be ready and able to educate everybody's children.

Critical Neuroscience

A Handbook of the Social and Cultural Contexts of Neuroscience

Author: Suparna Choudhury,Jan Slaby

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444343335

Category: Psychology

Page: 408

View: 6123

Critical Neuroscience: A Handbook of the Social and Cultural Contexts of Neuroscience brings together multi-disciplinary scholars from around the world to explore key social, historical and philosophical studies of neuroscience, and to analyze the socio-cultural implications of recent advances in the field. This text’s original, interdisciplinary approach explores the creative potential for engaging experimental neuroscience with social studies of neuroscience while furthering the dialogue between neuroscience and the disciplines of the social sciences and humanities. Critical Neuroscience transcends traditional skepticism, introducing novel ideas about ‘how to be critical’ in and about science.

Accounting for Culture

Thinking through Cultural Citizenship

Author: Caroline Andrew

Publisher: University of Ottawa Press

ISBN: 0776615335

Category: Political Science

Page: 300

View: 4224

Many scholars, practitioners, and policy-makers in the cultural sector argue that Canadian cultural policy is at a crossroads: that the environment for cultural policy-making has evolved substantially and that traditional rationales for state intervention no longer apply. The concept of cultural citizenship is a relative newcomer to the cultural policy landscape, and offers a potentially compelling alternative rationale for government intervention in the cultural sector. Likewise, the articulation and use of cultural indicators and of governance concepts are also new arrivals, emerging as potentially powerful tools for policy and program development. Accounting for Culture is a unique collection of essays from leading Canadian and international scholars that critically examines cultural citizenship, cultural indicators, and governance in the context of evolving cultural practices and cultural policy-making. It will be of great interest to scholars of cultural policy, communications, cultural studies, and public administration alike.

Challenging Codes

Collective Action in the Information Age

Author: Alberto Melucci

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521578431

Category: Political Science

Page: 441

View: 5708

Alberto Melucci brings an original perspective to research on collective action, emphasizing the role of culture and making telling connections with the experience of the individual in postmodern society. The focus is on the role of information in a world both fragmented and globalized, and topics addressed include political conflict, feminism, ecology, identity politics, power and inequality. The book builds on the author's Nomads of the Present (1989), and is a companion volume to The Playing Self (CUP, 1996).

Making our Way through the World

Human Reflexivity and Social Mobility

Author: Margaret S. Archer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139464963

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 8433

How do we reflect upon ourselves and our concerns in relation to society, and vice versa? Human reflexivity works through 'internal conversations' using language, but also emotions, sensations and images. Most people acknowledge this 'inner-dialogue' and can report upon it. However, little research has been conducted on 'internal conversations' and how they mediate between our ultimate concerns and the social contexts we confront. In this book, Margaret Archer argues that reflexivity is progressively replacing routine action in late modernity, shaping how ordinary people make their way through the world. Using interviewees' life and work histories, she shows how 'internal conversations' guide the occupations people seek, keep or quit; their stances towards structural constraints and enablements; and their resulting patterns of social mobility.