Presenting the Past

Psychoanalysis and the Sociology of Misremembering

Author: Jeffrey Prager

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674042360

Category: Medical

Page: 272

View: 9351

Psychology is the dogma of our age; psychotherapy is our means of self-understanding; and "repressed memory" is now a universally familiar form of trauma. Jeffrey Prager, who is both a sociologist and a psychoanalyst, explores the degree to which we manifest the cliches of our culture in our most private recollections. At the core of "Presenting the Past" is the dramatic and troubling case of a woman who during the course of her analysis began to recall scenes of her own childhood sexual abuse. Later the patient came to believe that the trauma she remembered as a physical violation might have been an emotional violation and that she had composed a memory out of present and past relationships. But what was accurate and true? And what evidence could be persuasive and valuable? Could the analyst trust either her convictions or his own? Using this case and others, Prager explores the nature of memory and its relation to the interpersonal, therapeutic, and cultural worlds in which remembering occurs. Synthesizing research from social science, psychoanalysis, neuroscience, and cognitive psychology, Prager uses clinical examples to argue more generally that our memories are never simple records of events, but constantly evolving constructions, affected by contemporary culture as well as by our own private lives. He demonstrates the need that sociology has for the insights of psychoanalysis, and the need that psychoanalysis has for the insights of sociology.

The Unhappy Divorce of Sociology and Psychoanalysis

Diverse Perspectives on the Psychosocial

Author: Lynn Chancer,John Andrews

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137304588

Category: Psychology

Page: 427

View: 7181

A collection of 18 contributions by well-known scholars in and outside the US, The Unhappy Divorce of Sociology and Psychoanalysis shows how sociology has much to gain from incorporating rather than overlooking or marginalizing psychoanalysis and psychosocial approaches to a wide range of social topics.

The Routledge Handbook of Psychoanalysis in the Social Sciences and Humanities

Author: Anthony Elliott,Jeffrey Prager

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317308204

Category: Social Science

Page: 478

View: 7937

The Routledge Handbook of Psychoanalysis in the Social Sciences and Humanities provides a comprehensive, critical overview of the historical, theoretical and applied forms of psychoanalytical criticism. This path-breaking Handbook offers students new ways of understanding the powers and limits of psychoanalysis, and of the social, cultural and political possibilities of psychoanalytic critique. The book offers students and professionals clear and concise chapters on the development of psychoanalysis, introducing key theories that have influenced debates over the psyche, desire and emotion in the social sciences and humanities. There are substantive chapters on classical Freudian theory, Kleinian and Bionian theory, object-relations psychoanalysis, Lacanian and post-Lacanian approaches, feminist psychoanalysis, as well as postmodern trends in psychoanalysis. There is a strong emphasis on interdisciplinary approaches to psychoanalytic critique, with contributions drawing from developments in sociology, politics, history, cultural studies, women’s studies and architecture.

The Fragmenting Force of Memory

Self, Literary Style, and Civil War in Lebanon

Author: Saadi Nikro

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 1443839558

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 215

View: 5027

This study is about experimental forms of cultural production that situate and work through personal experiences of the civil war in Lebanon. It addresses selected works of literature, autobiography and memoir by Jean Said Makdisi, Rashid al-Daif, Elias Khoury and Mai Ghoussoub, and the civil war trilogy of documentary films by Mohamed Soueid. From a phenomenological hermeneutic perspective, the book is concerned with how they give accounts of themselves as remnants, leftovers and undigested remains of the civil war, and of related trajectories of ideological attachment to symbolic mandates. Constrained to reposition their sense of self from an agent of history to a casualty of history, their acutely personal works of cultural production initiate an unraveling of both self and circumstance through the fragmenting force of memory. Drawing on a broad range of phenomenological critical theory (within the research fields of postcolonial, memory, psychoanalytic, gender and literary studies) attuned to subjectivity as a field of social production and exchange, emphasis is given to how the writers and filmmaker employ a non-presentist, anachronic or paratactic register of memory to excavate both a historical understanding of self and related modalities of social viability. This concerns how the symptomatic style of their work embodies, and creatively and critically situates, a refusal to package and normailze any idealized account of the war, related assemblages of temporal succession, or a presentation of self as discrete and omniscient.

Mobile Modernity

Germans, Jews, Trains

Author: Todd S Presner

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231511582

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 368

View: 6120

Though the history of the German railway system is often associated with the transportation of Jews to labor and death camps, Todd Presner looks instead to the completion of the first German railway lines and their role in remapping the cultural geography and intellectual history of Germany's Jews. Treating the German railway as both an iconic symbol of modernity and a crucial social, technological, and political force, Presner advances a groundbreaking interpretation of the ways in which mobility is inextricably linked to German and Jewish visions of modernity. Moving beyond the tired model of a failed German-Jewish dialogue, Presner emphasizes the mutual entanglement of the very categories of German and Jewish and the many sites of contact and exchange that occurred between German and Jewish thinkers. Turning to philosophy, literature, and the history of technology, and drawing on transnational cultural and diaspora studies, Presner charts the influence of increased mobility on interactions between Germans and Jews. He considers such major figures as Kafka, Heidegger, Arendt, Freud, Sebald, Hegel, and Heine, reading poetry next to philosophy, architecture next to literature, and railway maps next to cultural history. Rather than a conventional, linear history that culminates in the tragedy of the Holocaust, Presner produces a cultural mapping that articulates a much more complex story of the hopes and catastrophes of mobile modernity. By focusing on the spaces of encounter emblematically represented by the overdetermined triangulation of Germans, Jews, and trains, he introduces a new genealogy for the study of European and German-Jewish modernity.

Reluctant Witnesses

Survivors, Their Children, and the Rise of Holocaust Consciousness

Author: Arlene Stein

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199381925

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 3379

Americans now learn about the Holocaust in high school, watch films about it on television, and visit museums dedicated to preserving its memory. But for the first two decades following the end of World War II, discussion of the destruction of European Jewry was largely absent from American culture and the tragedy of the Holocaust was generally seen as irrelevant to non-Jewish Americans. Today, the Holocaust is widely recognized as a universal moral touchstone. In Reluctant Witnesses, sociologist Arlene Stein--herself the daughter of a Holocaust survivor--mixes memoir, history, and sociological analysis to tell the story of the rise of Holocaust consciousness in the United States from the perspective of survivors and their descendants. If survivors tended to see Holocaust storytelling as mainly a private affair, their children--who reached adulthood during the heyday of identity politics--reclaimed their hidden family histories and transformed them into public stories. Reluctant Witnesses documents how a group of people who had previously been unrecognized and misunderstood managed to find its voice. It tells this story in relation to the changing status of trauma and victimhood in American culture. At a time when a sense of Holocaust fatigue seems to be setting in and when the remaining survivors are at the end of their lives, it affirms that confronting traumatic memories and catastrophic histories can help us make our world mean something beyond ourselves.

Ferenczi for Our Time

Theory and Practice

Author: Judit Szekacs-Weisz,Tom Keve

Publisher: Karnac Books

ISBN: 1780490402

Category: Psychology

Page: 186

View: 8576

Ferenczi for Our Time presents contributions from British, French, American and Hungarian analysts of the second, third and even fourth generation, who deal with different dimensions of experiencing the external and internal world. These papers explore linkages between Ferenczi and the works of Winnicott, Klein, Alice, Michael and Enid Balint, the British Independents as well, as French analytical thought related to Dolto and beyond. The reader will also become acquainted with original documents of a revived Hungarian psychoanalytical world and new voices of Budapest. 'The Balints' chapter invites the reader to listen to colleagues sharing memories, recollections and images--allowing a personal glimpse into the life and professional-human environment of these extraordinary personalities. The topics discussed here are wide ranging: possibilities and impossibilities of elaborating social and individual traumata, child analysis and development, body-and-mind and clinical aspects of working with psychosomatic diseases. Functions and dysfunctions of societal and individual memory are explored as signifying 'blinded' spots in our vision of external and psychic reality as well as the vicissitudes of generational transmission of trauma. The scope of these papers covers methodology, theory and clinical practice.

The Mnemonic Imagination

Remembering as Creative Practice

Author: E. Keightley,M. Pickering

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 113727154X

Category: Social Science

Page: 239

View: 4818

An exploration of some of the key theoretical challenges and conceptual issues facing the emergent field of memory studies, from the relationship between experience and memory to the commercial exploitation of nostalgia, using the key concept of the mnemonic imagination.

Beyond Anne Frank

Hidden Children and Postwar Families in Holland

Author: Diane L. Wolf

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520226178

Category: History

Page: 391

View: 1154

Draws on interviews with Jewish men and women who were hidden as children during the Nazi occupation of Holland to explore how their experiences differed from those of Anne Frank.

The Holocaust and the postmodern

Author: Robert Eaglestone

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 369

View: 4915

The Holocaust and the Postmodern argues that postmodernism, especially understood in the light of the work of Emmanuel Levinas and Jacques Derrida, is a response to the Holocaust. This way of thinking offers new perspectives on Holocaust testimony, literature, historiography, and post-Holocaust philosophy. While postmodernism is often derided for being either playful and superficial or obscure and elitist, this book argues and demonstrates its commitment both to the past and to ethics. Dealing with Holocaust testimony, including the work of Primo Levi and Eli Wiesel, with the memoirs of "second generation" survivors and with recent Holocaust literature, including Anne Michael's Fugitive Pieces, Jonathan Safran Foer's Everything is Illuminated and the false memoir of "Benjamin Wilkomirski," Eaglestone argues for a new way of reading both Holocaust testimony and Holocaust fiction. Through an exploration of Holocaust historiography, the book offers a new approach to debates over truth and memory. Eaglestone argues for the central importance of the Holocaust in understanding the work of Emmanuel Levinas and Jacques Derrida, and goes on to explore what the Holocaust means for rationality, ethics, and for the idea of what it is to be human. Weaving together theory and practice, testimony, literature, history, philosophy, and Holocaust studies, this interdisciplinary book is the first to explore in detail the significance of the Holocaust for postmodernism, and the significance of postmodernism for understanding the Holocaust.

Sociological Abstracts

Author: Leo P. Chall

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Sociology

Page: N.A

View: 4476

Contains more that 300,000 records covering sociology, social work, and other social sciences. Covers 1963 to the present. Updated six times per year.

Cultural memory

essays on European literature and history

Author: C. E. J. Caldicott,Anne Fuchs

Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Inc

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 422

View: 3324

Memory and culture are terms which are now fashionable, if not over-used, but they need careful handling. This book explores their use in a variety of contexts: in European creative writing, in the spheres of national celebration, mourning, and administration of the arts, and in concepts of translation and history. The editors' introduction maps the surrounding theoretical terrain, and each of the following twenty-two essays explores related issues within the specific brief of a local context, whether in France, Germany, Ireland, Italy or Spain, organized under five thematic lines of enquiry: Memory as Counter-History, Narrativity and Remembering, Locating Memory, Remembering and Renewal, Remembering as Trauma. Coming into prominence after the Holocaust and the fall of European dictatorships, studies in Cultural Memory have been fuelled by the works of Walter Benjamin, Aby Warburg, the rediscovery of Maurice Halbwachs, and more recently by Pierre Nora's notion of 'sites of memory'. Furthermore, they have benefited from the reflections of a range of contemporary theorists in this area, including Paul Ricoeeur, Michel de Certeau and Jan Assman. The studies in this volume, however, go beyond the present to show how, in earlier times, the devices of memory and commemoration were exploited both for and against the state. Within the sphere of the present, the expression of memory in narrative is shown to be an essential source of inspiration for the creative writer, discovering renewal in a sense of loss.

Theories of social remembering

Author: Barbara A. Misztal

Publisher: Open Univ Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: Philosophy

Page: 190

View: 6832

"brilliant... an impressive tour de force" Network*Why does collective memory matter? *How is social memory generated, maintained and reproduced? *How do we explain changes in the content and role of collective memory? Through a synthesis of old and new theories of social remembering, this book provides the first comprehensive overview of the sociology of memory. This rapidly expanding field explores how representations of the past are generated, maintained and reproduced through texts, images, sites, rituals and experiences. The main aim of the book is to show to what extent the investigation of memory challenges sociological understandings of the formation of social identities and conflicts. It illustrates the new status of memory in contemporary societies by examining the complex relationships between memory and commemoration, memory and identity, memory and trauma, and memory and justice. The book consists of six chapters, with the first three devoted to conceptualising the process of remembering by analyzing memory's function, status and history, as well as by locating the study of memory in a broader field of social science. The second part of the book directly explores and discusses theories and studies of social remembering. After a short conclusion, which argues that study of collective memory is an important part of any examination of contemporary society, the glossary offers a concise and up to date overview of the development of relevant theoretical concepts. The result is an essential text for undergraduate courses in social theory, the sociology of memory and a wider audience in cultural studies, history and politics.

Revisiting Loss

Memory, Trauma and Nostalgia in the Novels of Kazuo Ishiguro

Author: Wojciech Drąg

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 1443863424

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 220

View: 4672

Loss is the core experience which determines the identity of Kazuo Ishiguro’s narrators and shapes their subsequent lives. Whether a traumatic ordeal, an act of social degradation, a failed relationship or a loss of home, the painful event serves as a sharp dividing line between the earlier, meaningful past and the period afterwards, which is infused with a sense of lack, dissatisfaction and nostalgia. Ishiguro’s narrators have been unable to confine their loss to the past and remain preoccupied by its legacy, which ranges from suppressed guilt to a keen sense of failure or disappointment. Their immersion in the past finds expression in the narratives which they weave in order to articulate, justify or merely understand their experiences. Their reconstructions of the past are interpreted as exercises in misremembering and self-deception which enable them to sustain their illusions and save them from despair. Revisiting Loss is the first book-length study of memory encompassing Ishiguro’s entire novelistic output. It adopts a highly interdisciplinary approach, combining a selection of philosophical (Jacques Derrida, Paul Ricoeur, and Jean Starobinski) and psychological perspectives (Sigmund Freud, Frederic Bartlett, Jacques Lacan, and Daniel L. Schacter). The book offers a thoroughly researched critical survey drawing on all published critical monographs and collections of academic articles on Ishiguro’s work.

The Hedgehog, the Fox, and the Magister's Pox

Mending the Gap Between Science and the Humanities

Author: Stephen Jay Gould

Publisher: Three Rivers Press (CA)

ISBN: 1400051533

Category: Science

Page: 273

View: 4571

Draws on the philosophy of seventh century B.C. Greek soldier and poet Archilochus to challenge assumptions about an inescapable conflict between science and the humanities, rebut ideas from Edward O. Wilson's Consilience, and explain why the pursuit of knowledge must always operate in tandem with nature. Reprint. 50,000 first printing.

The Lucifer Principle

A Scientific Expedition into the Forces of History

Author: Howard Bloom

Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic

ISBN: 0802192181

Category: Philosophy

Page: 466

View: 1384

The Lucifer Priciple is a revolutionary work that explores the intricate relationships among genetics, human behavior, and culture to put forth the thesis that “evil” is a by-product of nature’s strategies for creation and that it is woven into our most basic biological fabric. In a sweeping narrative that moves lucidly among sophisticated scientific disciplines and covers the entire span of the earth’s, as well as mankind’s, history, Howard Bloom challenges some of our most popular scientific assumptions. Drawing on evidence from studies of the most primitive organisms to those on ants, apes, and humankind, the author makes a persuasive case that it is the group, or “superorganism,” rather than the lone individual that really matters in the evolutionary struggle. But, Bloom asserts, the prominence of society and culture does not necessarily mitigate against our most violent, aggressive instincts. In fact, under the right circumstances the mentality of the group will only amplify our most primitive and deadly urges. In Bloom’s most daring contention he draws an analogy between the biological material whose primordial multiplication began life on earth and the ideas, or “memes,” that define, give cohesion to, and justify human superorganisms. Some of the most familiar memes are utopian in nature—Christianity or Marxism; nonetheless, these are fueled by the biological impulse to climb to the top of the heirarchy. With the meme’s insatiable hunger to enlarge itself, we have a precise prescription for war. Biology is not destiny; but human culture is not always the buffer to our most primitive instincts we would like to think it is. In these complex threads of thought lies the Lucifer Principle, and only through understanding its mandates will we able to avoid the nuclear crusades that await us in the twenty-first century.

Handbook of the Sociology of Sexualities

Author: John DeLamater,Rebecca F. Plante

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319173413

Category: Social Science

Page: 481

View: 8266

This volume provides researchers and scholars with a broad overview of the contributions of social psychologists and sociologists to the study of sexual relationships and sexual expression across the life course. These contributions include analyses of the dynamics of several types of contemporary sexual relationships – e.g., short-term, long-term non-exclusive, and committed. Chapters analyze the influence of major social institutions – e.g., religion, family and economy - on them. The content and scope of this volume have been carefully chosen to balance coverage of traditional emphases – dating, marriage, commercial sex work, sex education - with new and cutting edge materials – embodiment, Trans*, asexualities. Sections review major theoretical perspectives and the principal research methods. Coverage of sexual orientation is integrated throughout. This volume provides excellent resources for anyone interested in research on sexualities.

The Master and His Emissary

The Divided Brain and the Making of the Western World

Author: Iain McGilchrist

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 030014878X

Category: History

Page: 597

View: 9398

Why is the brain divided? The difference between right and left hemispheres has been puzzled over for centuries. In a book of unprecedented scope, Iain McGilchrist draws on a vast body of recent brain research, illustrated with case histories, to reveal that the difference is profound—not just this or that function, but two whole, coherent, but incompatible ways of experiencing the world. The left hemisphere is detail oriented, prefers mechanisms to living things, and is inclined to self-interest, where the right hemisphere has greater breadth, flexibility, and generosity. This division helps explain the origins of music and language, and casts new light on the history of philosophy, as well as on some mental illnesses. In the second part of the book, McGilchrist takes the reader on a journey through the history of Western culture, illustrating the tension between these two worlds as revealed in the thought and belief of thinkers and artists, from Aeschylus to Magritte. He argues that, despite its inferior grasp of reality, the left hemisphere is increasingly taking precedence in the modern world, with potentially disastrous consequences. This is truly a tour de force that should excite interest in a wide readership.