Piracy and Diplomacy in Seventeenth-century North Africa

The Journal of Thomas Baker, English Consul in Tripoli, 1677-1685

Author: Thomas Baker,C. R. Pennell

Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

ISBN: 9780838633021

Category: History

Page: 261

View: 1166

Consul Baker's detailed journal, published here for the first time, describes the exploits and operation of the Barbary corsairs; the diplomatic and naval activities of the English, French, and Dutch in the Mediterranean; and the political, economic, and social life of Tripoli. Comprehensive introduction and appendixes.

Bandits at Sea

A Pirates Reader

Author: C.R. Pennell

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814766781

Category: History

Page: 351

View: 3502

Examines the truth behind the mythical portrayals of pirates and piracy, including discussion on the purposes of "countercultural social bandits," women pirates, and democracy and racial equality practiced on pirate ships.

Pirates of Barbary

Corsairs, Conquests and Captivity in the Seventeenth-Century Mediterranean

Author: Adrian Tinniswood

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101445319

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 8713

The stirring story of the seventeenth-century pirates of the Mediterranean-the forerunners of today's bandits of the seas-and how their conquests shaped the clash between Christianity and Islam. It's easy to think of piracy as a romantic way of life long gone-if not for today's frightening headlines of robbery and kidnapping on the high seas. Pirates have existed since the invention of commerce itself, but they reached the zenith of their power during the 1600s, when the Mediterranean was the crossroads of the world and pirates were the scourge of Europe and the glory of Islam. They attacked ships, enslaved crews, plundered cargoes, enraged governments, and swayed empires, wreaking havoc from Gibraltar to the Holy Land and beyond. Historian and author Adrian Tinniswood brings alive this dynamic chapter in history, where clashes between pirates of the East-Tunis, Algiers, and Tripoli-and governments of the West-England, France, Spain, and Venice-grew increasingly intense and dangerous. In vivid detail, Tinniswood recounts the brutal struggles, glorious triumphs, and enduring personalities of the pirates of the Barbary Coast, and how their maneuverings between the Muslim empires and Christian Europe shed light on the religious and moral battles that still rage today. As Tinniswood notes in Pirates of Barbary, "Pirates are history." In this fascinating and entertaining book, he reveals that the history of piracy is also the history that shaped our modern world.

The Making of the Modern Mediterranean

Views from the South

Author: Judith E. Tucker

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0520304594

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 5419

"Studies of the pivotal historic place of the Mediterranean have long been dominated by specialists of its northern shores, that is, by European historians. In this groundbreaking volume, seven leading authors challenge views of Mediterranean space as shaped by European trajectories and so problematize our comfortable notions. Drawing perspectives from the south--from its Arab and African shores--the book asks anew: What is the Mediterranean? What are its borders and defining characteristics? What forces of nature, politics, culture, or economics have made the Mediterranean, and how long have they endured? How long will they? Covering the sixteenth to twentieth centuries, this timely volume brings the early modern world into conversation with the modern world in new ways, making clear that only recently have the northern and southern been differentiated into separate cultural and political zones. The Making of the Modern Mediterranean offers a blueprint for a new generation of readers to rethink the world we thought we knew"--Provided by publisher.

Turks, Moors, and Englishmen in the Age of Discovery

Author: Nabil Matar

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 023150571X

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 2657

During the early modern period, hundreds of Turks and Moors traded in English and Welsh ports, dazzled English society with exotic cuisine and Arabian horses, and worked small jobs in London, while the "Barbary Corsairs" raided coastal towns and, if captured, lingered in Plymouth jails or stood trial in Southampton courtrooms. In turn, Britons fought in Muslim armies, traded and settled in Moroccan or Tunisian harbor towns, joined the international community of pirates in Mediterranean and Atlantic outposts, served in Algerian households and ships, and endured captivity from Salee to Alexandria and from Fez to Mocha. In Turks, Moors, and Englishmen, Nabil Matar vividly presents new data about Anglo-Islamic social and historical interactions. Rather than looking exclusively at literary works, which tended to present unidimensional stereotypes of Muslims—Shakespeare's "superstitious Moor" or Goffe's "raging Turke," to name only two—Matar delves into hitherto unexamined English prison depositions, captives' memoirs, government documents, and Arabic chronicles and histories. The result is a significant alternative to the prevailing discourse on Islam, which nearly always centers around ethnocentrism and attempts at dominance over the non-Western world, and an astonishing revelation about the realities of exchange and familiarity between England and Muslim society in the Elizabethan and early Stuart periods. Concurrent with England's engagement and "discovery" of the Muslims was the "discovery" of the American Indians. In an original analysis, Matar shows how Hakluyt and Purchas taught their readers not only about America but about the Muslim dominions, too; how there were more reasons for Britons to venture eastward than westward; and how, in the period under study, more Englishmen lived in North Africa than in North America. Although Matar notes the sharp political and colonial differences between the English encounter with the Muslims and their encounter with the Indians, he shows how Elizabethan and Stuart writers articulated Muslim in terms of Indian, and Indian in terms of Muslim. By superimposing the sexual constructions of the Indians onto the Muslims, and by applying to them the ideology of holy war which had legitimated the destruction of the Indians, English writers prepared the groundwork for orientalism and for the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century conquest of Mediterranean Islam. Matar's detailed research provides a new direction in the study of England's geographic imagination. It also illuminates the subtleties and interchangeability of stereotype, racism, and demonization that must be taken into account in any responsible depiction of English history.

Literature of Travel and Exploration: G to P

Author: Jennifer Speake

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781579584245

Category: Travel writing

Page: 1479

View: 8998

Containing more than 600 entries, this valuable resource presents all aspects of travel writing. There are entries on places and routes (Afghanistan, Black Sea, Egypt, Gobi Desert, Hawaii, Himalayas, Italy, Northwest Passage, Samarkand, Silk Route, Timbuktu), writers (Isabella Bird, Ibn Battuta, Bruce Chatwin, Gustave Flaubert, Mary Kingsley, Walter Ralegh, Wilfrid Thesiger), methods of transport and types of journey (balloon, camel, grand tour, hunting and big game expeditions, pilgrimage, space travel and exploration), genres (buccaneer narratives, guidebooks, New World chronicles, postcards), companies and societies (East India Company, Royal Geographical Society, Society of Dilettanti), and issues and themes (censorship, exile, orientalism, and tourism). For a full list of entries and contributors, a generous selection of sample entries, and more, visit the Literature of Travel and Exploration: An Encyclopedia website.

The View from the Masthead

Maritime Imagination and Antebellum American Sea Narratives

Author: Hester Blum

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469606550

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 3220

With long, solitary periods at sea, far from literary and cultural centers, sailors comprise a remarkable population of readers and writers. Although their contributions have been little recognized in literary history, seamen were important figures in the nineteenth-century American literary sphere. In the first book to explore their unique contribution to literary culture, Hester Blum examines the first-person narratives of working sailors, from little-known sea tales to more famous works by Herman Melville, James Fenimore Cooper, Edgar Allan Poe, and Richard Henry Dana. In their narratives, sailors wrote about how their working lives coexisted with--indeed, mutually drove--their imaginative lives. Even at leisure, they were always on the job site. Blum analyzes seamen's libraries, Barbary captivity narratives, naval memoirs, writings about the Galapagos Islands, Melville's sea vision, and the crisis of death and burial at sea. She argues that the extent of sailors' literacy and the range of their reading were unusual for a laboring class, belying the popular image of Jack Tar as merely a swaggering, profane, or marginal figure. As Blum demonstrates, seamen's narratives propose a method for aligning labor and contemplation that has broader applications for the study of American literature and history.

Policing the Globe

Criminalization and Crime Control in International Relations

Author: Peter Andreas,Ethan Nadelmann

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198025009

Category: Political Science

Page: 352

View: 6492

In this illuminating history that spans past campaigns against piracy and slavery to contemporary campaigns against drug trafficking and transnational terrorism, Peter Andreas and Ethan Nadelmann explain how and why prohibitions and policing practices increasingly extend across borders. The internationalization of crime control is too often described as simply a natural and predictable response to the growth of transnational crime in an age of globalization. Andreas and Nadelmann challenge this conventional view as at best incomplete and at worst misleading. The internationalization of policing, they demonstrate, primarily reflects ambitious efforts by generations of western powers to export their own definitions of "crime," not just for political and economic gain but also in an attempt to promote their own morals to other parts of the world. A thought-provoking analysis of the historical expansion and recent dramatic acceleration of international crime control, Policing the Globe provides a much-needed bridge between criminal justice and international relations on a topic of crucial public importance.

Adventuring in North Africa

The Sierra Club Travel Guide to Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and the Maltese Islands

Author: Scott Wayne

Publisher: Random House (NY)

ISBN: N.A

Category: Travel

Page: 457

View: 7064

Here Is An unparalleled invitation to explore the legendary Maghreb -- "Land of the Setting Sun" -- which stretches in a crescent from Tunisia westward to Morocco. This popular region, where Arab, African and European influences blend in a rich overlay, includes such exotic ports of call as Casablanca, Tangier, Algiers, and Tunis, and is steeped in history -- from the Roman ruins of Carthage to the Saharan town of Tamanrasset in Algeria. Adventuring in North Africa guides travelers through the region's rich cultural and geographic diversity in a vivid, backroad journey to mountain villages, isolated beaches, and desert outposts. Visitors can choose from a multitude of adventures -- from skiing Morocco's Atlas mountains to trekking in Algeria's Hoggar mountains to exploring the Maltese Islands in the Mediterranean. Filled with solid information and the author's frequently amusing anecdotes about life in North Africa, this comprehensive guide features: -- A fascinating tour of the region's geography, climate, and natural history, as well as Arab and Berber history, culture, and religious practice -- Practical tips on getting there, getting around, and getting away; visas and permits; hotels, restaurants, and cafes; health precautions; special considerations for women travelers; and much, much more -- A wide range of outdoor adventures, including camel expeditions, trekking and horseback riding, snorkeling and scuba diving, hiking and biking, even snow-skiing -- Tips on everything from limbering up for a camel ride in the Sahara to haggling for a rug in Marrakesh; from deluxe excursions to bargain, do-it-yourself adventures -- Archaeological and historicalexplorations that range from prehistoric cave paintings deep in the Sahara to the medieval town of Ghardaia in Algeria

Die unbarmherzige Revolution

eine Geschichte des Kapitalismus

Author: Joyce Oldham Appleby

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783867741354

Category:

Page: 686

View: 1766

In ihrer großen Geschichte des Kapitalismus erzählt Joyce Appleby die Geschichte unseres Wirtschaftssystems: von den großen Entdeckungen der Portugiesen, vom Sklavenhandel über die industrielle Revolution bis zur Globalisierung der Gegenwart, und beschreibt schließlich unsere ökonomische und auch kulturelle Identität, die so sehr vom Kapitalismus geprägt ist. Messerscharf seziert sie die guten und die schlechten Seiten des Kapitalismus und beschreibt, was der Kapitalismus mit den Menschen macht. Eine mitreißende Lektüre für alle, die von der "unbarmherzigen Revolution" profitieren oder an ihr verzweifeln.