The Great Powers and the European States System 1814-1914

Author: Roy Bridge,Roger Bullen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317867912

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 3460

This book illuminates, in the form of a clear, well-paced and student-friendly analytical narrative, the functioning of the European states system in its heyday, the crucial century between the defeat of Napoleon in 1814 and the outbreak of the First World War just one hundred years later. In this substantially revised and expanded version of the text, the author has included the results of the latest research, a body of additional information and a number of carefully designed maps that will make the subject even more accessible to readers.

The Peace War

Author: Vernor Vinge

Publisher: Tor Books

ISBN: 9781429915113

Category: Fiction

Page: 304

View: 5454

The Peace War is quintessential hard-science adventure. The Peace Authority conquered the world with a weapon that never should have been a weapon--the "bobble," a spherical force-field impenetrable by any force known to mankind. Encasing governmental installations and military bases in bobbles, the Authority becomes virtually omnipotent. But they've never caught Paul Hoehler, the maverick who invented the technology, and who has been working quietly for decades to develop a way to defeat the Authority. With the help of an underground network of determined, independent scientists and a teenager who may be the apprentice genius he's needed for so long, he will shake the world, in the fast-paced hard-science thriller that garnered Vinge the first of his four Hugo nominations for best novel. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

The Pursuit of Power

Europe, 1815-1914

Author: Richard J. Evans

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0241295777

Category: History

Page: 848

View: 366

ECONOMIST BOOKS OF THE YEAR 2016 'A scintillating, encyclopaedic history, rich in detail from the arcane to the familiar... a veritable tour de force' Richard Overy, New Statesman 'Transnational history at its finest ... .. social, political and cultural themes swirl together in one great canvas of immense detail and beauty' Gerard DeGroot, The Times 'Dazzlingly erudite and entertaining' Dominic Sandbrook, The Sunday Times A masterpiece which brings to life an extraordinarly turbulent and dramatic era of revolutionary change. The Pursuit of Power draws on a lifetime of thinking about nineteenth-century Europe to create an extraordinarily rich, surprising and entertaining panorama of a continent undergoing drastic transformation. The book aims to reignite the sense of wonder that permeated this remarkable era, as rulers and ruled navigated overwhelming cultural, political and technological changes. It was a time where what was seen as modern with amazing speed appeared old-fashioned, where huge cities sprang up in a generation, new European countries were created and where, for the first time, humans could communicate almost instantly over thousands of miles. In the period bounded by the Battle of Waterloo and the outbreak of World War I, Europe dominated the rest of the world as never before or since: this book breaks new ground by showing how the continent shaped, and was shaped by, its interactions with other parts of the globe. Richard Evans explores fully the revolutions, empire-building and wars that marked the nineteenth century, but the book is about so much more, whether it is illness, serfdom, religion or philosophy. The Pursuit of Power is a work by a historian at the height of his powers: essential for anyone trying to understand Europe, then or now.

The Sleepwalkers

How Europe Went to War in 1914

Author: Christopher Clark

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062199226

Category: History

Page: 736

View: 7365

One of The New York Times Book Review’s 10 Best Books of the Year Winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize (History) The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 is historian Christopher Clark’s riveting account of the explosive beginnings of World War I. Drawing on new scholarship, Clark offers a fresh look at World War I, focusing not on the battles and atrocities of the war itself, but on the complex events and relationships that led a group of well-meaning leaders into brutal conflict. Clark traces the paths to war in a minute-by-minute, action-packed narrative that cuts between the key decision centers in Vienna, Berlin, St. Petersburg, Paris, London, and Belgrade, and examines the decades of history that informed the events of 1914 and details the mutual misunderstandings and unintended signals that drove the crisis forward in a few short weeks. Meticulously researched and masterfully written, Christopher Clark’s The Sleepwalkers is a dramatic and authoritative chronicle of Europe’s descent into a war that tore the world apart.

Deviance in International Relations

'Rogue States' and International Security

Author: W. Wagner,W. Werner,M. Onderco

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137357274

Category: Law

Page: 215

View: 8124

Rogue states' have been high on the policy agenda for many years but their theoretical significance for international relations has remained poorly understood. In contrast to the bulk of writings on 'rogue states' that address them merely as a policy challenge, this book studies what we can learn from deviance about international politics.

The Peace Discourse in Europe, 1900-1945

Author: Alberto Castelli

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351036203

Category: History

Page: 242

View: 7839

This book charts ideas European intellectuals (mostly from Great Britain, France, Germany and Italy) put forward to solve the problem of war during the first half of the twentieth century: a period that began with the Anglo-Boer war and that ended with the explosion of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Such ideas do not belong to a homogeneous tradition of thought, but can be understood as a unique discourse that takes different characteristics according to the point of view of each author and of the specific historical situation.

Soldiers, Statecraft, and History

Coercive Diplomacy and International Order

Author: James A. Nathan

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780275976354

Category: History

Page: 188

View: 6754

The increasing capacity of states to muster violence, military power as a meaningful instrument of foreign policy, and the frequent episodic collapse of that power are considered.

The War That Ended Peace

The Road to 1914

Author: Margaret MacMillan

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 0812994701

Category: Political Science

Page: 784

View: 1965

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review • The Economist • The Christian Science Monitor • Bloomberg Businessweek • The Globe and Mail From the bestselling and award-winning author of Paris 1919 comes a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, a fascinating portrait of Europe from 1900 up to the outbreak of World War I. The century since the end of the Napoleonic wars had been the most peaceful era Europe had known since the fall of the Roman Empire. In the first years of the twentieth century, Europe believed it was marching to a golden, happy, and prosperous future. But instead, complex personalities and rivalries, colonialism and ethnic nationalisms, and shifting alliances helped to bring about the failure of the long peace and the outbreak of a war that transformed Europe and the world. The War That Ended Peace brings vividly to life the military leaders, politicians, diplomats, bankers, and the extended, interrelated family of crowned heads across Europe who failed to stop the descent into war: in Germany, the mercurial Kaiser Wilhelm II and the chief of the German general staff, Von Moltke the Younger; in Austria-Hungary, Emperor Franz Joseph, a man who tried, through sheer hard work, to stave off the coming chaos in his empire; in Russia, Tsar Nicholas II and his wife; in Britain, King Edward VII, Prime Minister Herbert Asquith, and British admiral Jacky Fisher, the fierce advocate of naval reform who entered into the arms race with Germany that pushed the continent toward confrontation on land and sea. There are the would-be peacemakers as well, among them prophets of the horrors of future wars whose warnings went unheeded: Alfred Nobel, who donated his fortune to the cause of international understanding, and Bertha von Suttner, a writer and activist who was the first woman awarded Nobel’s new Peace Prize. Here too we meet the urbane and cosmopolitan Count Harry Kessler, who noticed many of the early signs that something was stirring in Europe; the young Winston Churchill, then First Lord of the Admiralty and a rising figure in British politics; Madame Caillaux, who shot a man who might have been a force for peace; and more. With indelible portraits, MacMillan shows how the fateful decisions of a few powerful people changed the course of history. Taut, suspenseful, and impossible to put down, The War That Ended Peace is also a wise cautionary reminder of how wars happen in spite of the near-universal desire to keep the peace. Destined to become a classic in the tradition of Barbara Tuchman’s The Guns of August, The War That Ended Peace enriches our understanding of one of the defining periods and events of the twentieth century. Praise for The War That Ended Peace “Magnificent . . . The War That Ended Peace will certainly rank among the best books of the centennial crop.”—The Economist “Superb.”—The New York Times Book Review “Masterly . . . marvelous . . . Those looking to understand why World War I happened will have a hard time finding a better place to start.”—The Christian Science Monitor “The debate over the war’s origins has raged for years. Ms. MacMillan’s explanation goes straight to the heart of political fallibility. . . . Elegantly written, with wonderful character sketches of the key players, this is a book to be treasured.”—The Wall Street Journal “A magisterial 600-page panorama.”—Christopher Clark, London Review of Books

The End of Tsarist Russia

The March to World War I and Revolution

Author: Dominic Lieven

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0698195566

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 6763

An Economist Best Book of the Year A Financial Times Best Book of the Year Winner of the the Pushkin House Russian Book Prize Finalist for the Lionel Gelber Prize An Amazon Best Book of the Month (History) One of the world’s leading scholars offers a fresh interpretation of the linked origins of World War I and the Russian Revolution "Lieven has a double gift: first, for harvesting details to convey the essence of an era and, second, for finding new, startling, and clarifying elements in familiar stories. This is history with a heartbeat, and it could not be more engrossing."—Foreign Affairs World War I and the Russian Revolution together shaped the twentieth century in profound ways. In The End of Tsarist Russia, acclaimed scholar Dominic Lieven connects for the first time the two events, providing both a history of the First World War’s origins from a Russian perspective and an international history of why the revolution happened. Based on exhaustive work in seven Russian archives as well as many non-Russian sources, Dominic Lieven’s work is about far more than just Russia. By placing the crisis of empire at its core, Lieven links World War I to the sweep of twentieth-century global history. He shows how contemporary hot issues such as the struggle for Ukraine were already crucial elements in the run-up to 1914. By incorporating into his book new approaches and comparisons, Lieven tells the story of war and revolution in a way that is truly original and thought-provoking. From the Hardcover edition.

The Rise And Fall of British Naval Mastery

Author: Paul Kennedy

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141983833

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 4052

Paul Kennedy's classic naval history, now updated with a new introduction by the author This acclaimed book traces Britain's rise and fall as a sea power from the Tudors to the present day. Challenging the traditional view that the British are natural 'sons of the waves', he suggests instead that the country's fortunes as a significant maritime force have always been bound up with its economic growth. In doing so, he contributes significantly to the centuries-long debate between 'continental' and 'maritime' schools of strategy over Britain's policy in times of war. Setting British naval history within a framework of national, international, economic, political and strategic considerations, he offers a fresh approach to one of the central questions in British history. A new introduction extends his analysis into the twenty-first century and reflects on current American and Chinese ambitions for naval mastery. 'Excellent and stimulating' Correlli Barnett 'The first scholar to have set the sweep of British Naval history against the background of economic history' Michael Howard, Sunday Times 'By far the best study that has ever been done on the subject ... a sparkling and apt quotation on practically every page' Daniel A. Baugh, International History Review 'The best single-volume study of Britain and her naval past now available to us' Jon Sumida, Journal of Modern History

War and Revolution in Russia, 1914-22

The Collapse of Tsarism and the Establishment of Soviet Power

Author: Christopher Read

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 1137295686

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 7707

The First World War unleashed a powerful, transforming, destructive storm across the European continent. Its consequences were felt as harshly in Russia as anywhere else in the world. A spiral of chaos and violence erupted, continuing to reign throughout years of revolution and civil war. Leading expert Christopher Read presents a cutting-edge, highly readable introduction to Russia's crisis years. Read synthesises a wealth of newly available material and treats the period 1914-22 as a whole in order to contextualise and better understand the events of 1917 and their impact. As he examines the multiple revolutions, Read asks how and why the Bolsheviks were able to survive the storm, eventually taking over the world's largest country.

The Economic Consequences of the Peace

The classic text on the Treaty of Versailles and post war Europe

Author: John Maynard Keynes

Publisher: Harriman House Limited

ISBN: 0857190113

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 174

View: 5939

An attendee at the ill-fated Versailles Conference, John Maynard Keynes had a front-row seat for the negotiations that would squander a peace and sew discord across a continent. One of his best-written works, 'The Economic Consequences of the Peace' was key in propelling Keynes to prominence. Published in 1919, it gained notoriety owing to its withering portraits of both French premier Georges Clemenceau and US president Woodrow Wilson. A best seller throughout the world, it was instrumental in creating the perception of the Germans as unfairly treated after the First World War. This in turn was crucial in prompting public support for appeasement, so that both the Treaty - and his eloquent criticisms of it - form a key part of the background to both World Wars I and II.

How Britain Won the War of 1812

The Royal Navy's Blockades of the United States, 1812-1815

Author: Brian Arthur

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd

ISBN: 1843836653

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 1670

Overturns established thinking about the Anglo-American War of 1812-15.

War Veterans and Fascism in Interwar Europe

Author: Ángel Alcalde

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107198429

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 4602

Were war veterans a key factor in the emergence and expansion of fascism movements and regimes in interwar Europe? Transcending the long-standing controversies around the notion of 'brutalisation', this book applies a transnational perspective to offer a new and suggestive interpretation of the relationship between war veterans and fascism. Drawing on a wide range of sources written in five different languages, Alcalde analyses the creation and transnational circulation of the 'myth of the fascist veterans', first promoted by Benito Mussolini and the Italian fascist movement, and later embraced by the Stahlhelm, the Nazis, the Faisceau and the Falange among other groups across the European continent. Spanning historical events from Fascist Italy to Francoist Spain, War Veterans and Fascism in Interwar Europe is an illuminating social, cultural and international history of war veterans between the years of the Great War to the beginning of the Second World War.

International History of the Twentieth Century

Author: Antony Best,Jussi Hanhimaki,Joseph A. Maiolo,Kirsten E. Schulze,Jussi M. Hanhimäki

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134622198

Category: History

Page: 560

View: 2632

This major new global history of the twentieth century is written by four prominent international historians for first-year undergraduate level and upward. Using their thematic and regional expertise, the authors have produced an authoritative yet accessible account of the history of international relations in the last century, covering events in Europe, Asia, the Middle East, Africa and the Americas. They focus on the history of relations between states and on the broad ideological, economic and cultural forces that have influenced the evolution of international politics over the past one hundred years. Among the areas this book covers are: the decline of European hegemony over the international order the diffusion of power to the two superpowers the rise of newly independent states in Asia and Africa the course and consequences of the three major global conflicts of the twentieth century: the Great War, the Second World War and the Cold War. This is an absolutely essential book in the study of twentieth century history. Students will find themselves lacking without it.

The Long Fuse

An Interpretation of the Origins of World War I

Author: Laurence Lafore

Publisher: Praeger Pub Text

ISBN: 9780313229695

Category: History

Page: 282

View: 603