Partition

The Story of Indian Independence and the Creation of Pakistan in 1947

Author: Barney White-Spunner

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781471148033

Category:

Page: 432

View: 952

The International Bestseller 'Barney White-Spunner's book stands out for its judicious and unsparing look at events from a British perspective.' Dominic Sandbrook, Sunday Times Review 'This book is at its most powerful in its month-by-month narrative of how Partition tore apart northern and eastern India, with the new state of Pakistan carved out of communities who had lived together for the past millennium.' Zareer Masani BBC History Magazine 'A highly readable account . . .' Times Literary Review Between January and August 1947 the conflicting political, religious and social tensions in India culminated in independence from Britain and the creation of Pakistan. Those months saw the end of ninety years of the British Raj, and the effective power of the Maharajahs, as the Congress Party established itself commanding a democratic government in Delhi. They also witnessed the rushed creation of Pakistan as a country in two halves whose capitals were two thousand kilometers apart. From September to December 1947 the euphoria surrounding the realization of the dream of independence dissipated into shame and incrimination; nearly 1 million people died and countless more lost their homes and their livelihoods as partition was realized. The events of those months would dictate the history of South Asia for the next seventy years, leading to three wars, countless acts of terrorism, polarization around the Cold War powers and to two nations with millions living in poverty spending disproportionate amounts on their military. The roots of much of the violence in the region today, and worldwide, are in the decisions taken that year. Not only were those decisions controversial but the people who made them were themselves to become some of the most enduring characters of the twentieth century. Gandhi and Nehru enjoyed almost saint like status in India, and still do, whilst Jinnah is lionized in Pakistan. The British cast, from Churchill to Attlee and Mountbatten, find their contribution praised and damned in equal measure. Yet it is not only the national players whose stories fascinate. Many of those ordinary people who witnessed the events of that year are still alive. Although most were, predictably, only children, there are still some in their late eighties and nineties who have a clear recollection of the excitement and the horror. Illustrating the story of 1947 with their experiences and what independence and partition meant to the farmers of the Punjab, those living in Lahore and Calcutta, or what it felt like to be a soldier in a divided and largely passive army, makes the story real. Partition will bring to life this terrible era for the Indian Sub Continent.

Partition

The story of Indian independence and the creation of Pakistan in 1947

Author: Barney White-Spunner

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1471148025

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 785

Between January and August 1947 the conflicting political, religious and social tensions in India culminated in independence from Britain and the creation of Pakistan. Those months saw the end of ninety years of the British Raj, and the effective power of the Maharajahs, as the Congress Party established itself commanding a democratic government in Delhi. They also witnessed the rushed creation of Pakistan as a country in two halves whose capitals were two thousand kilometers apart. From September to December 1947 the euphoria surrounding the realization of the dream of independence dissipated into shame and incrimination; nearly 1 million people died and countless more lost their homes and their livelihoods as partition was realized. The events of those months would dictate the history of South Asia for the next seventy years, leading to three wars, countless acts of terrorism, polarization around the Cold War powers and to two nations with millions living in poverty spending disproportionate amounts on their military. The roots of much of the violence in the region today, and worldwide, are in the decisions taken that year. Not only were those decisions controversial but the people who made them were themselves to become some of the most enduring characters of the twentieth century. Gandhi and Nehru enjoyed almost saint like status in India, and still do, whilst Jinnah is lionized in Pakistan. The British cast, from Churchill to Attlee and Mountbatten, find their contribution praised and damned in equal measure. Yet it is not only the national players whose stories fascinate. Many of those ordinary people who witnessed the events of that year are still alive. Although most were, predictably, only children, there are still some in their late eighties and nineties who have a clear recollection of the excitement and the horror. Illustrating the story of 1947 with their experiences and what independence and partition meant to the farmers of the Punjab, those living in Lahore and Calcutta, or what it felt like to be a soldier in a divided and largely passive army, makes the story real. Partition will bring to life this terrible era for the Indian Sub Continent.

Partition

Author: Barney White-Spunner

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781471148002

Category:

Page: 432

View: 8825

Between January and August 1947 the conflicting political, religious and social tensions in India culminated in independence from Britain and the creation of Pakistan. Those months saw the end of ninety years of the British Raj, and the effective power of the Maharajahs, as the Congress Party established itself commanding a democratic government in Delhi. They also witnessed the rushed creation of Pakistan as a country in two halves whose capitals were two thousand kilometers apart. From September to December 1947 the euphoria surrounding the realization of the dream of independence dissipated into shame and incrimination; nearly 1 million people died and countless more lost their homes and their livelihoods as partition was realized. The events of those months would dictate the history of South Asia for the next seventy years, leading to three wars, countless acts of terrorism, polarization around the Cold War powers and to two nations with millions living in poverty spending disproportionate amounts on their military. The roots of much of the violence in the region today, and worldwide, are in the decisions taken that year. Not only were those decisions controversial but the people who made them were themselves to become some of the most enduring characters of the twentieth century. Gandhi and Nehru enjoyed almost saint like status in India, and still do, whilst Jinnah is lionized in Pakistan. The British cast, from Churchill to Attlee and Mountbatten, find their contribution praised and damned in equal measure. Yet it is not only the national players whose stories fascinate. Many of those ordinary people who witnessed the events of that year are still alive. Although most were, predictably, only children, there are still some in their late eighties and nineties who have a clear recollection of the excitement and the horror. Illustrating the story of 1947 with their experiences and what independence and partition meant to the farmers of the Punjab, those living in Lahore and Calcutta, or what it felt like to be a soldier in a divided and largely passive army, makes the story real. Partition will bring to life this terrible era for the Indian Sub Continent.

The Great Partition

The Making of India and Pakistan

Author: Yasmin Khan

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300120783

Category: History

Page: 251

View: 8287

Examines the context, execution and aftermath of partition, integrating the knowledge of political manoeuvres with an understanding of their fundamental social and cultural consequences. This account draws together a body of research to reappraise independence and division and reinforce its catastrophic human cost.

The Shadow of the Great Game

The Untold Story of India's Partition

Author: Narendra Singh Sarila

Publisher: Constable

ISBN: 1472128222

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 7187

The untold story of Indias Partition. The partition of India in 1947 was the only way to contain intractable religious differences as the subcontinent moved towards independence - or so the story goes. But this dramatic new history reveals previously overlooked links between British strategic interests - in the oil wells of the Middle East and maintaining access to its Indian Ocean territories - and partition. Narendra Singh Sarela reveals here how hte Great Gane against the Soviet Union cast a long shadow. The top-secret documentary evidence unearthed by the author sheds new light on several prominent figures, including Gandhi, Jinnah, Mountbatten, Churchill, Attlee, Wavell and Nerhu. This radical reassessment of one of the key events in British colonial history is important in itself, but its claim that many of the roots of Islamic terrorism sweeping the world today lie in the partition of India has much wider implications.

Indian Summer

The Secret History of the End of an Empire

Author: Alex von Tunzelmann

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1471114767

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 8547

The stroke of midnight on 15 August 1947 liberated 400 million Indians from the British Empire. One of the defining moments of world history had been brought about by a tiny number of people, including Jawaharlal Nehru, the fiery prime minister-to-be; Gandhi, the mystical figure who enthralled a nation; and Louis and Edwina Mountbatten, the glamorous but unlikely couple who had been dispatched to get Britain out of India without delay. Within hours of the midnight chimes, however, the two new nations of India and Pakistan would descend into anarchy and terror. INDIAN SUMMERdepicts the epic sweep of events that ripped apart the greatest empire the world has ever seen, and reveals the secrets of the most powerful players on the world stage: the Cold War conspiracies, the private deals, and the intense and clandestine love affair between the wife of the last viceroy and the first prime minister of free India. With wit, insight and a sharp eye for detail, Alex von Tunzelmann relates how a handful of people changed the world for ever.

Midnight's Furies

The Deadly Legacy of India's Partition

Author: Nisid Hajari

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445648091

Category:

Page: 336

View: 2408

After centuries of British rule, nobody expected Indian Independence and the birth of Pakistan to be so bloody - they were supposed to be the answer to the dreams of Muslims and Hindus. Jawaharlal Nehru, Gandhi's protégé and the political leader of India, believed Indians were an inherently nonviolent, peaceful people. Pakistan's founder, Mohammad Ali Jinnah, was a secular lawyer, not a firebrand. But in August 1946, exactly a year before Independence, Calcutta erupted in street-gang fighting. A cycle of riots - targeting Hindus, then Muslims, then Sikhs - spiraled out of control. As the summer of 1947 approached, all three groups were heavily armed and on edge, and the British rushed to leave. Hell let loose. Trains carried Muslims west and Hindus east to their slaughter. Some of the most brutal and widespread ethnic cleansing in modern history erupted on both sides of the new border, carving a gulf between India and Pakistan that remains a root cause of many evils. From jihadi terrorism to nuclear proliferation, the searing tale told in Midnight's Furies explains all too many of the headlines we read today.

1947. A Memoir of Indian Independence

Author: M. Zahir

Publisher: FriesenPress

ISBN: 1525502352

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 252

View: 7166

M. Zahir was born in Ludhiana in the Indian Province of Punjab in 1936. His father was a doctor in the Punjab Medical Service and at the time of Indian Independence was in charge of the Government Hospital in the small town of Mukerian. Zahir describes the ancient, multicultural society he lived in, and its sudden and complete destruction in 1947 when India achieved its independence. India's independence from the British Raj was accompanied by the division of the country into India and Pakistan, a divide which resulted in unspeakable violence with the death of close to two million people. Caught on the wrong side of the dividing line between India and Pakistan, Zahir's family tried to leave by train to Pakistan. The train was ambushed and almost all the Muslims men were killed on the spot and women abducted. Miraculously, a young Hindu put his own life in danger to save most of Zahir's family. As a boy, Zahir witnessed firsthand what is described as ‘the greatest loss of civilian life in human history in the absence of war or famine’. In this meticulously- remembered memoir, Zahir describes the events leading to Indian Independence, the catastrophic train journey, and his life in the new country of Pakistan. The legacy of those events still haunts the world. Zahir, a Rhodes Scholar and a retired physician, now lives in British Columbia, Canada.

The Night Diary

Author: Veera Hiranandani

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0735228531

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 272

View: 1298

In the vein of Inside Out and Back Again and The War That Saved My Life comes a poignant, personal, and hopeful tale of India's partition, and of one girl's journey to find a new home in a divided country It's 1947, and India, newly independent of British rule, has been separated into two countries: Pakistan and India. The divide has created much tension between Hindus and Muslims, and hundreds of thousands are killed crossing borders. Half-Muslim, half-Hindu twelve-year-old Nisha doesn't know where she belongs, or what her country is anymore. When Papa decides it's too dangerous to stay in what is now Pakistan, Nisha and her family become refugees and embark first by train but later on foot to reach her new home. The journey is long, difficult, and dangerous, and after losing her mother as a baby, Nisha can't imagine losing her homeland, too. But even if her country has been ripped apart, Nisha still believes in the possibility of putting herself back together. Told through Nisha's letters to her mother, The Night Diary is a heartfelt story of one girl's search for home, for her own identity...and for a hopeful future.

The Independence of India and Pakistan

New Approaches and Reflections

Author: Ian Talbot

Publisher: OUP Pakistan

ISBN: 9780199064786

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 8699

This book brings together essays on the politics, legacies and violence which accompanied the 1947 division of the Indian subcontinent. It provides fresh insights into the role of leading British personalities, the interconnection of, politics and violence and the social impact of the resulting upheaval.

Jinnah

India, Partition, Independence

Author: Jaswant Singh

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9788129116536

Category:

Page: 669

View: 2235


Literature, Gender, and the Trauma of Partition

The Paradox of Independence

Author: Debali Mookerjea-Leonard

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317293886

Category: Social Science

Page: 198

View: 6200

Partition occurring simultaneously with British decolonization of the Indian subcontinent led to the formation of independent India and Pakistan. While the political and communal aspects of the Partition have received some attention, its enormous personal and psychological costs have been mostly glossed over, particularly when it comes to the splitting of Bengal. The memory of this historical ordeal has been preserved in literary archives, and these archives are still being excavated. This book examines neglected narratives of the Partition of India in 1947 to study the traces left by this foundational trauma on the national- and regional-cultural imaginaries in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. To arrive at a more complex understanding of how Partition experiences of violence, migration, and displacement shaped postcolonial societies and subjectivities in South Asia, the author analyses, through novels and short stories, multiple cartographies of disorientation and anxiety in the post-Partition period. The book illuminates how contingencies of political geography cut across personal and collective histories, and how these intersections are variously marked and mediated by literature. Examining works composed in Bengali and other South Asian languages, this book seeks to broaden and complicate existing conceptions of what constitutes the Partition literary archive. A valuable addition to the growing field of Partition studies, this book will be of interest to scholars of South Asian history, gender studies, and literature.

Refugees and the Politics of the Everyday State in Pakistan

Resettlement in Punjab, 1947-1962

Author: Elisabetta Iob

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351395998

Category: History

Page: 174

View: 590

The Partition of India in 1947 involved the division of two provinces, Bengal and the Punjab, based on district-wise Hindu or Muslim majorities. The Partition displaced between 10 and 12 million people along religious lines. This book provides a comprehensive and in-depth analysis of the resettlement and rehabilitation of Partition refugees in Pakistani Punjab between 1947 and 1962. It weaves a chronological and thematic plot into a single narrative, and focuses on the Punjabi refugee middle and upper-middle class. Emphasising the everyday experience of the state, the author challenges standard interpretations of the resettlement of Partition refugees in the region and calls for a more nuanced understanding of their rehabilitation. The book argues the universality of the so-called 'exercise in human misery', and the heterogeneity of the rehabilitation policies. Refugees’ stories and interactions with local institutions reveal the inability of the local bureaucracy to establish its own 'polity' and the viable workability of Pakistan as a state. The use of Pakistani documents, US and British records and a careful survey of both the judicial records and the Urdu and English-language dailies of the time, provides an invaluable window onto the everyday life of a state, its institutions and its citizens. A carefully researched study of both the state and the everyday lives of refugees as they negotiated resettlement, through both personal and official channels, the book offers an important reinterpretation of the first years of Pakistani history. It will be of interest to academics working in the field of refugee resettlement ?and South Asian History and Politics.

The Psychological Impact of the Partition of India

Author: Sanjeev Jain,Alok Sarin

Publisher: SAGE Publishing India

ISBN: 9352806514

Category: Social Science

Page: 260

View: 1454

The first of its kind, this book studies the psychological impact of Partition through medical and psychiatric perspectives. The Partition of India was a partitioning of minds as much as it was a geographical division. But there has been little discussion in mental health discourse on the psychological scars it caused. This book examines the partitioning of human experience and its impact on social life and psychological health. The chapters track, through various approaches, the breakdown of civic life and society during the cataclysmic event, the collapse of medical services, the violence against citizens and the reflection of these events in writings of that era. The book draws attention to the urgent need for a humane understanding of persons with mental illness and psychological distress in the context of their lived history as much as their sociocultural identities and roots.

Kashmir in Conflict

India, Pakistan and the Unending War

Author: Victoria Schofield

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 0857730789

Category: Political Science

Page: 336

View: 4410

After 20 years of insurgency, Kashmir continues to be a major flashpoint and decisive factorin destabilising regional relations. Resolving the dispute over the state of Jammu andKashmir is crucial to achieving peace and stability, without which the US Af-Pak strategy isunlikely to succeed. With international eyes focused on South Asia, understanding what is atstake in Kashmir has never been more important. For decades, the dispute over the valley of Kashmir, famed for its beauty and tranquility, has determined much of Pakistan's and India'sforeign policy. With the state, located between two nuclear armed states and India blaming Pakistani militants for the 2008 terrorist attacks on Mumbai, the potential widerimplications of the conflict are higher than ever on the international agenda. Kashmir in Conflict offers a highly readable, carefully documented account of the origins,development and implications of this contentious issue. Beginning with the early history ofthe independent kingdom of Kashmir, Victoria Schofield traces the origins of the modernstate in the nineteenth century, including the controversial ‘sale’ by the British ofpredominantly Muslim Kashmir to a Hindu ruler. She examines the implications for thepeople when in 1947 the Maharaja chose secular, yet majority Hindu, India over Muslim Pakistan and shows why the neighbouring countries continue to argue over the status ofJammu and Kashmir which, according to recommendations passed by the UN, was to bedetermined by the will of the people. Drawing upon research in the state of Jammu and Kashmir, India, Pakistan, and a range ofhistorical sources, Schofield analyses critically the actions of the key players who, throughoutits history, have contributed to the current militarisation of the valley. And with the help ofnumerous interviews she takes into account the hopes and fears of all the interested parties – Pakistan, India and the people of Jammu and Kashmir who are themselves divided, not onlyby their linguistic and cultural traditions, but also in their objectives.

India at War

The Subcontinent and the Second World War

Author: Yasmin Khan

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199753490

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 1494

"First published in Great Britain in 2015 as The Raj at War by The Bodley Head"--Title page verso.

The Spoils of Partition

Bengal and India, 1947–1967

Author: Joya Chatterji

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139468308

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 1727

The partition of India in 1947 was a seminal event of the twentieth century. Much has been written about the Punjab and the creation of West Pakistan; by contrast, little is known about the partition of Bengal. This remarkable book by an acknowledged expert on the subject assesses the social, economic and political consequences of partition. Using compelling sources, the book, which was originally published in 2007, shows how and why the borders were redrawn, how the creation of new nation states led to unprecedented upheavals, massive shifts in population and wholly unexpected transformations of the political landscape in both Bengal and India. The book also reveals how the spoils of partition, which the Congress in Bengal had expected from the new boundaries, were squandered over the twenty years which followed. This is an intriguing and challenging work whose findings change our understanding and its consequences for the history of the subcontinent.

An American Witness To India's Partition

Author: Phillip Talbot

Publisher: SAGE Publications India

ISBN: 8132101561

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 7700

In 1938 the New York-based Institute of Current World Affairs awarded 23-year-old Phillips Talbot a fellowship with a mandate: visit South Asia and learn about the intricacies of life in India. Till 1950, Talbot graphically recounted the buildup to Indian and Pakistani independence, and the early experiences of the new states in the form of several letters to the institute. Talbot`s reports from the field, presented here in the original, offer a kaleidoscope of first-hand observations: on student life at the Aligarh Muslim University, local life in a small Muslim community in Kashmir, a Vedic ashram in Lahore, Tagore`s Shantiniketan, Gandhi’s Sevagram, crucial sessions of the Indian National Congress and the All India Muslim League, the Kodaikanal Ashram Fellowship, Hindu and Muslim urban communities in Lahore and Bombay, Afghanistan, a walk with Gandhi in Noakhali, the parties` negotiations with Mountbatten that led to independence and more. Written with flair and insight, An American Witness to India`s Partition, provides a perceptive view of South Asian society in its decisive decade.

Liberty Or Death

India's Journey to Independence and Division

Author: Patrick French

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 9780241950401

Category: India

Page: 512

View: 8765

'A fine, lucid book . . . vividly drawn with novel-like touches' Hanif Kureshi At midnight on 14 August 1947, Britain's 350-year-old Indian Empire was broken into three pieces. The greatest mass migration in history began, as Muslims fled north and Hindus fled south, and Britain's role as an imperial power came to an end. Patrick French's vivid and surprising account of the chaotic final years of colonial rule in India has been acclaimed as the definitive book on this subject. Journeying across India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, he brings to life a cast of characters including spies, idealists, freedom fighters and politicians from Churchill to Gandhi. The result is a compelling story of deal-making, missed opportunities, hope and tragedy. 'Extraordinarily able and nuanced . . . a brilliant book on an important subject . . . French is the most impressive Western historian of modern India currently at work' HERALD 'Beautifully written' SUNDAY TIMES 'French is a natural storyteller . . . a delightful tale of intrigue, ham-handedness and just plain blundering' INDIA TODAY