Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West

Author: William Cronon

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393072452

Category: History

Page: 592

View: 5704

A Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and Winner of the Bancroft Prize. "No one has written a better book about a city…Nature's Metropolis is elegant testimony to the proposition that economic, urban, environmental, and business history can be as graceful, powerful, and fascinating as a novel." —Kenneth T. Jackson, Boston Globe In this groundbreaking work, William Cronon gives us an environmental perspective on the history of nineteenth-century America. By exploring the ecological and economic changes that made Chicago America's most dynamic city and the Great West its hinterland, Mr. Cronon opens a new window onto our national past. This is the story of city and country becoming ever more tightly bound in a system so powerful that it reshaped the American landscape and transformed American culture. The world that emerged is our own. Winner of the Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize

Nature's Metropolis

Chicago And The Great West

Author: Cheryl Hudson

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1351352547

Category: History

Page: 100

View: 3025

What caused the rise of Chicago, and how did the city's expansion fuel the westward movement of the American frontier – and influence the type of society that evolved as a result? Nature's Metropolis emerged as a result of William Cronon asking and answering those questions, and the work can usefully be seen as an extended example of the critical thinking skill of problem-solving in action. Cronon navigates a path between the followers of Frederick Jackson Turner, author of the thesis that American character was shaped by the experience of the frontier, and revisionists who sought to suggest that the rugged individualism Turner depicted as a creation of life in the West was little but a fiction. For Cronon, the most productive question to ask was not whether or not men forged in the liberty-loving furnace of the Wild West had the sort of impact on America that Turner posited, but the quite different one of how capitalism and political economy had combined to drive the westward expansion of the US. For Cronon, individualism was scarcely even possible in a capitalist machine in which humans were little more than cogs, and the needs and demands of capital, not capitalists, prevailed. Nature's Metropolis, then, is a work in which the rise of Chicago is explained by generating alternative possibilities, and one that uses a rigorous study of the evidence to decide between competing solutions to the problem. It is also a fine work of interpretation, for a large part of Cronon's argument revolves around his attempt to define exactly what is rural, and what urban, and how the two interact to create a novel economic force.

The American Cities and Technology Reader

Wilderness to Wired City

Author: Open University

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415200851

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 309

View: 3195

Designed to be used on its own or as a companion volume to the American Cities and Technologytextbook. Chronologically, this volume ranges from the earliest technological dimensions of Amerindian settlements to the 'wired city' concept of the 1960s and internet communications of the 1990s.Its focus extends beyond the US to include telecommunications in Asian cities in the late 20th century. The topics covered: * the rise of the skyscraper * the coming of the automobile age * relations between private and public transport * the development of infrastructural technologies and systems * the implications of electronic communications * the emergence of city planning.

Stadtgeschichten

Author: Claudia Schnurmann,Iris Wigger

Publisher: LIT Verlag Münster

ISBN: 9783825892548

Category: History

Page: 305

View: 6902

Tales of Two Cities compares both metropolises and soon discovers differences as well as similarities. American and German experts from different fields (for example historians, geographers, architects, journalists or Americanists) join our 'guided tours' through Chicago and Hamburg. They introduce the reader to the sister cities as migration magnets and spaces of different interests. They discuss challenges and chances of urban life, city planning, safety measures or media cities within an Atlantic context. The volume includes contributions in German as well as English. Claudia Schnurmann is a researcher at the Department of History at the University of Hamburg (Germany). Iris Wigger is a researcher at the School of Sociology at University College in Dublin (Ireland).

Tod und Leben großer amerikanischer Städte

Author: Jane Jacobs

Publisher: Birkhäuser

ISBN: 3035602123

Category: Architecture

Page: 220

View: 9038

In The Death and Life of Great American Cities durchleuchtet Jane Jacobs 1961 die fragwürdigen Methoden der Stadtplanung und Stadtsanierung in Amerika, der "New Yorker" nannte es das unkonventionellste und provozierendste Buch über Städtebau seit langem. Die deutsche Ausgabe wurde schnell auch im deutschsprachigem Raum zu einer viel gelesenen und diskutierten Lektüre. Sie ist jetzt wieder in einem Nachdruck zugänglich, mit einem Vorwort von Gerd Albers (1993), das nach der Aktualität dieser Streitschrift fragt.

Wohlstand und Armut der Nationen

Warum die einen reich und die anderen arm sind

Author: David Landes

Publisher: Siedler Verlag

ISBN: 3641051118

Category: History

Page: 688

View: 374

Das Standardwerk zur Wirtschaftsgeschichte Kaum eine Frage ist umstrittener und stärker mit Ideologie befrachtet als die, warum manche Länder wirtschaftlich äußerst erfolgreich sind, während andere unfähig scheinen, aus ihrer Armut herauszufinden. Liegt es am Klima? An der Kultur? An der Politik? In seiner umfassenden Geschichte über die Weltwirtschaft der letzten sechshundert Jahre entwickelt David Landes Antworten auf diese Fragen und bietet zugleich ein Standardwerk zur Geschichte der Weltwirtschaft.

The Politics of Place

A History of Zoning in Chicago

Author: Joseph P. Schwieterman,Dana M. Caspall

Publisher: Lake Claremont Press

ISBN: 9781893121263

Category: History

Page: 191

View: 2904

Only in Chicago Can Zoning Be Epic... Chicago is renowned for its distinctive skyline, its bustling Loop business district, and its diverse neighborhoods. How the face of Chicago came to be is a story of enterprise, ingenuity, opportunity--and zoning. Until now, however, there has not been a book that focuses on the important, often surprising, role of zoning in shaping the 'The City that Works.' "The Politics of Place: A History of Zoning in Chicago" reviews the interplay among development, planning, and zoning in the growth of the Gold Coast, the Central Area, and, more recently, massive 'Planned Developments'; such as Marina City, Illinois Center, and Dearborn Park. It tells the story of bold visions compromised by political realities, battles between residents and developers, and occasional misfires from City Council and City Hall. What emerges is a fascinating, behind-the-scenes inspection of the evolving character of the city's landscape. Schwieterman and Caspall recount the many planning innovations that have originated in Chicago, the complexities and intrigue of its zoning debates, and the recent adoption of a new zoning ordinance that promises to affect the city's economy and image for years to come.

The Oxford Handbook of Environmental History

Author: Andrew C. Isenberg

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199394474

Category: Science

Page: 640

View: 8505

The field of environmental history emerged just decades ago but has established itself as one of the most innovative and important new approaches to history, one that bridges the human and natural world, the humanities and the sciences. With the current trend towards internationalizing history, environmental history is perhaps the quintessential approach to studying subjects outside the nation-state model, with pollution, global warming, and other issues affecting the earth not stopping at national borders. With 25 essays, this Handbook is global in scope and innovative in organization, looking at the field thematically through such categories as climate, disease, oceans, the body, energy, consumerism, and international relations.

Natural Causes

Essays in Ecological Marxism

Author: James R. O'Connor

Publisher: Guilford Press

ISBN: 9781572302730

Category: Science

Page: 350

View: 6270

This work shows how the policies and imperatives of business and government influence - and are influenced by - environment and social change. It examines the power of ecological Marxist analysis for grounding economic behaviour in the real world and for formulating political strategies.

Natural Protest

Essays on the History of American Environmentalism

Author: Michael Egan,Jeff Crane

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113527679X

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 2468

From Jamestown to 9/11, concerns about the landscape, husbanding of natural resources, and the health of our environment have been important to the American way of life. Natural Protest is the first collection of original essays to offer a cohesive social and political examination of environmental awareness, activism, and justice throughout American history. Editors Michael Egan and Jeff Crane have selected the finest new scholarship in the field, establishing this complex and fascinating subject firmly at the forefront of American historical study. Focused and thought-provoking, Natural Protest presents a cutting-edge perspective on American environmentalism and environmental history, providing an invaluable resource for anyone concerned about the ecological fate of the world around us.

Hydropolis

Wasser und die Stadt der Moderne

Author: Susanne Frank,Matthew Gandy

Publisher: Campus Verlag

ISBN: 359340446X

Category: Social Science

Page: 372

View: 8611

Stinkende Abwässer im städtischen Untergrund oder kristallklares Wasser im heimischen Bad – eine funktionierende Abwasserentsorgung ist in der modernen Stadt ebenso unabdingbar wie eine gute Wasserversorgung. Die Nutzung des Wassers seit dem 19. Jahrhundert untersuchen hier unter anderem Geographen, Soziologen, Medizin- und Umwelthistoriker. Sie schildern die mit der Urbanisierung einhergehenden Veränderungen der sozialen und räumlichen Strukturen in den Städten sowie die politischen Regulierungen der Wassernutzung. Ob schrumpfende ostdeutsche Städte, Großstädte wie Berlin oder »Megacities« wie Lagos und Jakarta: Der Umgang mit Wasser erweist sich als Schlüssel zum Verständnis moderner Stadtkultur. Mit Beiträgen unter anderem von Matthias Bernt, Jürgen Büschenfeld, Elisabeth Heidenreich, Detlev Ipsen, Ulrich Koppitz, Shahrooz Mohajeri, Engelbert Schramm, Eric Swyngedouw, Heinrich Tepasse und Karin Winklhöfer.

Beyond Nature's Housekeepers

American Women in Environmental History

Author: Nancy C. Unger

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199986002

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 8018

From pre-Columbian times to the environmental justice movements of the present, women and men frequently responded to the environment and environmental issues in profoundly different ways. Although both environmental history and women's history are flourishing fields, explorations of the synergy produced by the interplay between environment and sex, sexuality, and gender are just beginning. Offering more than biographies of great women in environmental history, Beyond Nature's Housekeepers examines the intersections that shaped women's unique environmental concerns and activism and that framed the way the larger culture responded. Women featured include Native Americans, colonists, enslaved field workers, pioneers, homemakers, municipal housekeepers, immigrants, hunters, nature writers, soil conservationists, scientists, migrant laborers, nuclear protestors, and environmental justice activists. As women, they fared, thought, and acted in ways complicated by social, political, and economic norms, as well as issues of sexuality and childbearing. Nancy C. Unger reveals how women have played a unique role, for better and sometimes for worse, in the shaping of the American environment.

The Political Economy of American Industrialization, 1877–1900

Author: Richard Franklin Bensel

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139936476

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 3851

In the late nineteenth century, the United States underwent an extremely rapid industrial expansion that moved the nation into the front ranks of the world economy. At the same time, the nation maintained democratic institutions as the primary means of allocating political offices and power. The combination of robust democratic institutions and rapid industrialization is rare and this book explains how development and democracy coexisted in the United States during industrialization. Most literature focuses on either electoral politics or purely economic analyses of industrialization. This book synthesizes politics and economics by stressing the Republican party's role as a developmental agent in national politics, the primacy of the three great developmental policies (the gold standard, the protective tariff, and the national market) in state and local politics, and the impact of uneven regional development on the construction of national political coalitions in Congress and presidential elections.

Urban Green

Nature, Recreation, and the Working Class in Industrial Chicago

Author: Colin Fisher

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469619962

Category: Nature

Page: 248

View: 8282

In early twentieth-century America, affluent city-dwellers made a habit of venturing out of doors and vacationing in resorts and national parks. Yet the rich and the privileged were not the only ones who sought respite in nature. In this pathbreaking book, historian Colin Fisher demonstrates that working-class white immigrants and African Americans in rapidly industrializing Chicago also fled the urban environment during their scarce leisure time. If they had the means, they traveled to wilderness parks just past the city limits as well as to rural resorts in Wisconsin and Michigan. But lacking time and money, they most often sought out nature within the city itself--at urban parks and commercial groves, along the Lake Michigan shore, even in vacant lots. Chicagoans enjoyed a variety of outdoor recreational activities in these green spaces, and they used them to forge ethnic and working-class community. While narrating a crucial era in the history of Chicago's urban development, Fisher makes important interventions in debates about working-class leisure, the history of urban parks, environmental justice, the African American experience, immigration history, and the cultural history of nature.

The Republic of Nature

An Environmental History of the United States

Author: Mark Fiege

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295804149

Category: History

Page: 520

View: 3812

In the dramatic narratives that comprise The Republic of Nature, Mark Fiege reframes the canonical account of American history based on the simple but radical premise that nothing in the nation's past can be considered apart from the natural circumstances in which it occurred. Revisiting historical icons so familiar that schoolchildren learn to take them for granted, he makes surprising connections that enable readers to see old stories in a new light. Among the historical moments revisited here, a revolutionary nation arises from its environment and struggles to reconcile the diversity of its people with the claim that nature is the source of liberty. Abraham Lincoln, an unlettered citizen from the countryside, steers the Union through a moment of extreme peril, guided by his clear-eyed vision of nature's capacity for improvement. In Topeka, Kansas, transformations of land and life prompt a lawsuit that culminates in the momentous civil rights case of Brown v. Board of Education. By focusing on materials and processes intrinsic to all things and by highlighting the nature of the United States, Fiege recovers the forgotten and overlooked ground on which so much history has unfolded. In these pages, the nation's birth and development, pain and sorrow, ideals and enduring promise come to life as never before, making a once-familiar past seem new. The Republic of Nature points to a startlingly different version of history that calls on readers to reconnect with fundamental forces that shaped the American experience. For more information, visit the author's website: http://republicofnature.com/

Introduction to Economic Geography

Globalization, Uneven Development and Place

Author: Danny MacKinnon,Andrew Cumbers

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317902963

Category: Science

Page: 350

View: 6627

Today’s rapidly flowing global economy, hit by recession following the financial crisis of 2008/9, means the geographical economic perspective has never been more important. An Introduction to Economic Geography comprehensively guides you through the core issues and debates of this vibrant and exciting area, whilst also exploring the range of approaches and paradigms currently invigorating the wider discipline. Rigorous and accessible, the authors demystify and enliven a crucial subject for geographical study. Underpinned by the themes of globalisation, uneven development and place, the text explores the diversity and vitality of contemporary economic geography. It balances coverage of 'traditional' areas such as regional development and labour markets with insight into new and evolving topics like neoliberalism, consumption, creativity and alternative economic practices. An Introduction to Economic Geography is an essential textbook for undergraduate students taking courses in Economic Geography, Globalisation Studies and more broadly in Human Geography. It will also be of key interest to anyone in Planning, Business and Management Studies and Economics.

American Pests

The Losing War on Insects from Colonial Times to DDT

Author: James E. McWilliams

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231511361

Category: Science

Page: 312

View: 9856

The world of insects is one we only dimly understand. Yet from using arsenic, cobalt, and quicksilver to kill household infiltrators to employing the sophisticated tools of the Orkin Man, Americans have fought to eradicate the "bugs" they have learned to hate. Inspired by the still-revolutionary theories of Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, James E. McWilliams argues for a more harmonious and rational approach to our relationship with insects, one that does not harm our environment and, consequently, ourselves along the way. Beginning with the early techniques of colonial farmers and ending with the modern use of chemical insecticides, McWilliams deftly shows how America's war on insects mirrors its continual struggle with nature, economic development, technology, and federal regulation. He reveals a very American paradox: the men and women who settled and developed this country sought to control the environment and achieve certain economic goals; yet their methods of agricultural expansion undermined their efforts and linked them even closer to the inexorable realities of the insect world. As told from the perspective of the often flamboyant actors in the battle against insects, American Pests is a fascinating investigation into the attitudes, policies, and practices that continue to influence our behavior toward insects. Asking us to question, if not abandon, our reckless (and sometimes futile) attempts at insect control, McWilliams convincingly argues that insects, like people, have an inherent right to exist and that in our attempt to rid ourselves of insects, we compromise the balance of nature.

Urban Wildscapes

Author: Anna Jorgensen,Richard Keenan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136662820

Category: Architecture

Page: 272

View: 8490

Urban Wildscapes is one of the first edited collections of writings about urban ‘wilderness’ landscapes. Evolved, rather than designed or planned, these derelict, abandoned and marginal spaces are frequently overgrown with vegetation and host to a wide range of human activities. They include former industrial sites, landfill, allotments, cemeteries, woods, infrastructural corridors, vacant lots and a whole array of urban wastelands at a variety of different scales. Frequently maligned in the media, these landscapes have recently been re-evaluated and this collection assembles these fresh perspectives in one volume. Combining theory with illustrated examples and case studies, the book demonstrates that urban wildscapes have far greater significance, meaning and utility than is commonly thought, and that an appreciation of their particular qualities can inform a far more sustainable approach to the planning, design and management of the wider urban landscape. The wildscapes under investigation in this book are found in diverse locations throughout the UK, Europe, China and the US. They vary in scale from small sites to entire cities or regions, and from discrete locations to the imaginary wildscapes of children’s literature. Many different themes are addressed including the natural history of wildscapes, their significance as a location for all kinds of playful activity, the wildscape as ‘commons’ and the implications for landscape architectural practice, ranging from planting interventions in wildscapes to the design of the urban public realm on wildscape principles.

United States West Coast

An Environmental History

Author: Adam M. Sowards

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1851099093

Category: Science

Page: 393

View: 8229

The most up-to-date and insightful overview available on the environmental history of the West Coast of the United States, a region of extraordinary physical beauty distinguished by its inhabitants' efforts to both sustain and exploit their natural resources. * Over 20 primary sources, revealing cultural understandings of nature and ecological consequences of human action, as well as highlighting controversies concerning environmental change along the U.S. Pacific Coast * An up-to-date bibliography of research and publications on the environmental history of the region