Native Seattle

Histories from the Crossing-Over Place

Author: Coll Thrush

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 9780295989921

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 5670

Winner of the 2008 Washington State Book Award for History/Biography In traditional scholarship, Native Americans have been conspicuously absent from urban history. Indians appear at the time of contact, are involved in fighting or treaties, and then seem to vanish, usually onto reservations. In Native Seattle, Coll Thrush explodes the commonly accepted notion that Indians and cities-and thus Indian and urban histories-are mutually exclusive, that Indians and cities cannot coexist, and that one must necessarily be eclipsed by the other. Native people and places played a vital part in the founding of Seattle and in what the city is today, just as urban changes transformed what it meant to be Native. On the urban indigenous frontier of the 1850s, 1860s, and 1870s, Indians were central to town life. Native Americans literally made Seattle possible through their labor and their participation, even as they were made scapegoats for urban disorder. As late as 1880, Seattle was still very much a Native place. Between the 1880s and the 1930s, however, Seattle's urban and Indian histories were transformed as the town turned into a metropolis. Massive changes in the urban environment dramatically affected indigenous people's abilities to survive in traditional places. The movement of Native people and their material culture to Seattle from all across the region inspired new identities both for the migrants and for the city itself. As boosters, historians, and pioneers tried to explain Seattle's historical trajectory, they told stories about Indians: as hostile enemies, as exotic Others, and as noble symbols of a vanished wilderness. But by the beginning of World War II, a new multitribal urban Native community had begun to take shape in Seattle, even as it was overshadowed by the city's appropriation of Indian images to understand and sell itself. After World War II, more changes in the city, combined with the agency of Native people, led to a new visibility and authority for Indians in Seattle. The descendants of Seattle's indigenous peoples capitalized on broader historical revisionism to claim new authority over urban places and narratives. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, Native people have returned to the center of civic life, not as contrived symbols of a whitewashed past but on their own terms. In Seattle, the strands of urban and Indian history have always been intertwined. Including an atlas of indigenous Seattle created with linguist Nile Thompson, Native Seattle is a new kind of urban Indian history, a book with implications that reach far beyond the region. Replaced by ISBN 9780295741345

Native Seattle

Histories from the Crossing-Over Place

Author: Coll Thrush

Publisher: Weyerhaeuser Environmental Books

ISBN: 9780295741338

Category: SOCIAL SCIENCE

Page: 392

View: 5852

"This updated edition of Native Seattle brings the indigenous story to the present day and puts the movement to recognize Seattle's Native past into a broader context. Native Seattle focuses on the experiences of local indigenous communities on whose land Seattle grew, accounts of Native migrants to the city, and the development of a multi-tribal urban community, as well as on the role Native Americans have played in the narrative of Seattle."--Page 4 of cover.

Native Seattle

Histories from the Crossing-Over Place

Author: Coll Thrush

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 029574135X

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 5329

This updated edition of Native Seattle brings the indigenous story to the present day and puts the movement of recognizing Seattle's Native past into a broader context. Native Seattle focuses on the experiences of local indigenous communities on whose land Seattle grew, accounts of Native migrants to the city and the development of a multi-tribal urban community, as well as the role Native Americans have played in the narrative of Seattle.

The Wisdom of the Native Americans

Including The Soul of an Indian and Other Writings of Ohiyesa and the Great Speeches of Red Jacket, Chief Joseph, and Chief Seattle

Author: Kent Nerburn

Publisher: New World Library

ISBN: 9781577312970

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 5417

The teachings of the Native Americans provide a connection with the land, the environment, and the simple beauties of life. This collection of writings from revered Native Americans offers timeless, meaningful lessons on living and learning. Taken from writings, orations, and recorded observations of life, this book selects the best of Native American wisdom and distills it to its essence in short, digestible quotes — perhaps even more timely now than when they were first written. In addition to the short passages, this edition includes the complete Soul of an Indian, as well as other writings by Ohiyesa (Charles Alexander Eastman), one of the great interpreters of American Indian thought, and three great speeches by Chiefs Joseph, Seattle, and Red Jacket.

Skid Road

An Informal Portrait of Seattle

Author: Murray Morgan

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295743506

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 1983

Skid Road tells the story of Seattle �from the bottom up,� offering an informal and engaging portrait of the Emerald City�s first century, as seen through the lives of some of its most colorful citizens. With his trademark combination of deep local knowledge, precision, and wit, Murray Morgan traces the city�s history from its earliest days as a hacked-from-the-wilderness timber town, touching on local tribes, settlers, the lumber and railroad industries, the great fire of 1889, the Alaska gold rush, flourishing dens of vice, general strikes, the 1962 World�s Fair, and the stuttering growth of the 1970s and �80s. Through it all, Morgan shows us that Seattle�s one constant is change and that its penchant for reinvention has always been fueled by creative, if sometimes unorthodox, residents. With a new introduction by Pulitzer Prize-winning book critic Mary Ann Gwinn, this redesigned edition of Murray Morgan�s classic work is a must for those interested in how Seattle got to where it is today.

Chief Seattle and the Town That Took His Name

The Change of Worlds for the Native People and Settlers on Puget Sound

Author: David M. Buerge

Publisher: Sasquatch Books

ISBN: 1632171368

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 3993

This is the first thorough historical account of Chief Seattle and his times--the story of a half-century of tremendous flux, turmoil, and violence, during which a native American war leader became an advocate for peace and strove to create a successful hybrid racial community. When the British, Spanish, and then Americans arrived in the Pacific Northwest, it may have appeared to them as an untamed wilderness. In fact, it was a fully settled and populated land. Chief Seattle was a powerful representative from this very ancient world. Historian David Buerge has been researching and writing this book about the world of Chief Seattle for the past 20 years. Buerge has threaded together disparate accounts of the time from the 1780s to the 1860s--including native oral histories, Hudson Bay Company records, pioneer diaries, French Catholic church records, and historic newspaper reporting. Chief Seattle had gained power and prominence on Puget Sound as a war leader, but the arrival of American settlers caused him to reconsider his actions. He came to embrace white settlement and, following traditional native practice, encouraged intermarriage between native people and the settlers, offering his own daughter and granddaughters as brides, in the hopes that both peoples would prosper. Included in this account are the treaty signings that would remove the natives from their historic lands, the roles of such figures as Governor Isaac Stevens, Chiefs Leschi and Patkanim, the Battle at Seattle that threatened the existence of the settlement, and the controversial Chief Seattle speech that haunts to this day the city that bears his name.

Phantom Past, Indigenous Presence

Native Ghosts in North American Culture and History

Author: Colleen E. Boyd

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803236182

Category: Social Science

Page: 317

View: 3535

The imagined ghosts of Native Americans have been an important element of colonial fantasy in North America ever since European settlements were established in the seventeenth century. Native burial grounds and Native ghosts have long played a role in both regional and local folklore and in the national literature of the United States and Canada, as settlers struggled to create a new identity for themselves that melded their European heritage with their new, North American frontier surroundings. In this interdisciplinary volume, Colleen E. Boyd and Coll Thrush bring together scholars from a variety of fields to discuss this North American fascination with "the phantom Native American." "Phantom Past, Indigenous Presence" explores the importance of ancestral spirits and historic places in Indigenous and settler communities as they relate to territory and history--in particular cultural, political, social, historical, and environmental contexts. From examinations of how individuals reacted to historical cases of "hauntings," to how Native phantoms have functioned in the literature of North Americans, to interdisciplinary studies of how such beliefs and narratives allowed European settlers and Indigenous people to make sense of the legacies of colonialism and conquest, these essays show how the past and the present are intertwined through these stories.

Indians in the Making

Ethnic Relations and Indian Identities Around Puget Sound

Author: Alexandra Harmon

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520226852

Category: History

Page: 393

View: 6327

"A compelling survey history of Pacific Northwest Indians as well as a book that brings considerable theoretical sophistication to Native American history. Harmon tells an absorbing, clearly written, and moving story."—Peggy Pascoe, University of Oregon "This book fills a terribly important niche in the wider field of ethnic studies by attempting to define Indian identity in an interactive way."—George Sánchez, University of Southern California

Indigenous London

Native Travelers at the Heart of Empire

Author: Coll Thrush

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300206305

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 7802

An imaginative retelling of London's history, framed through the experiences of Indigenous travelers who came to the city over the course of more than five centuries London is famed both as the ancient center of a former empire and as a modern metropolis of bewildering complexity and diversity. In Indigenous London, historian Coll Thrush offers an imaginative vision of the city's past crafted from an almost entirely new perspective: that of Indigenous children, women, and men who traveled there, willingly or otherwise, from territories that became Canada, New Zealand, Australia, and the United States, beginning in the sixteenth century. They included captives and diplomats, missionaries and shamans, poets and performers. Some, like the Powhatan noblewoman Pocahontas, are familiar; others, like an Odawa boy held as a prisoner of war, have almost been lost to history. In drawing together their stories and their diverse experiences with a changing urban culture, Thrush also illustrates how London learned to be a global, imperial city and how Indigenous people were central to that process.

The Forging of a Black Community

Seattles Central District from 1870 through the Civil Rights Era

Author: Quintard Taylor

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295802235

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 4477

Through much of the twentieth century, black Seattle was synonymous with the Central District--a four-square-mile section near the geographic center of the city. Quintard Taylor explores the evolution of this community from its first few residents in the 1870s to a population of nearly forty thousand in 1970. With events such as the massive influx of rural African Americans beginning with World War II and the transformation of African American community leadership in the 1960s from an integrationist to a �black power� stance, Seattle both anticipates and mirrors national trends. Thus, the book addresses not only a particular city in the Pacific Northwest but also the process of political change in black America.

The City Is More Than Human

An Animal History of Seattle

Author: Frederick L. Brown

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295999357

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 4354

Winner, 2017 Virginia Marie Folkins Award, Association of King County Historical Organizations (AKCHO) Seattle would not exist without animals. Animals have played a vital role in shaping the city from its founding amid existing indigenous towns in the mid-nineteenth century to the livestock-friendly town of the late nineteenth century to the pet-friendly, livestock-averse modern city. When newcomers first arrived in the 1850s, they hastened to assemble the familiar cohort of cattle, horses, pigs, chickens, and other animals that defined European agriculture. This, in turn, contributed to the dispossession of the Native residents of the area. However, just as these animals were used to create a Euro-American city, the elimination of these same animals from Seattle was key to the creation of the new middle-class neighborhoods of the twentieth century. As dogs and cats came to symbolize home and family, Seattleites� relationship with livestock became distant and exploitative, demonstrating the deep social contradictions that characterize the modern American metropolis. Throughout Seattle�s history, people have sorted animals into categories and into places as a way of asserting power over animals, other people, and property. In The City Is More Than Human, Frederick Brown explores the dynamic, troubled relationship humans have with animals. In so doing he challenges us to acknowledge the role of animals of all sorts in the making and remaking of cities.

Divided Destiny

A History of Japanese Americans in Seattle

Author: David A. Takami

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 93

View: 8484

This vivid and concise history traces more than a hundred years of Japanese Americans in Seattle, before and after the tumultuous events of the early 1940s, when World War II and the incarceration of Japanese Americans divided the community from its past and forced tens of thousands of people to uproot and start anew. Concentration camps at Minidoka, Idaho, and nine other inland locations were the crucible for postwar change and accomplishment, but at the same time shattered the dreams and spirits of many of the older immigrant Issei. The story is local, but it is representative of the Japanese American experience on the U.S. West Coast. Poignant photographs from family albums and historical archives illustrate the book, giving faces and names to history.

The Spirit Within

Author: Seattle Art Museum

Publisher: Rizzoli International Publications

ISBN: N.A

Category: Art

Page: 303

View: 5773

A catalog of the collection of Native American art, which consists mainly of ritual objects and ceremonial finery. Includes commentary by Native American artists, scholars, and authors.

Gardening with Native Plants of the Pacific Northwest

Author: Arthur Kruckeberg,Linda Chalker-Scott

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781771645065

Category:

Page: 432

View: 9260

With hundreds of stunning color photographs and new chapters by horticulturist inda Chalker-Scott, this fully updated edition of one of the Pacific Northwest's favorite gardening books is more extensive and user-friendly than ever before. This fully-updated third edition of Gardening with Native Plants of the Pacific Northwestincludes revised designations for species, genus, and family names for numerous native plants, and over 900 beautiful and informative color photos of native trees, shrubs, perennials, grasses, and annuals. Each species has been carefully selected as garden-worthy, setting this book apart from encyclopedic tomes containing comprehensive lists of native plants. Building on the classic text by the late botanist Arthur R. Kruckeberg, horticulturist Linda Chalker-Scott as contributed several new chapters on garden ecology and the latest in garden science. Thorough, practical, and easy to use, this updated edition of the book Sunset magazine called a "standard guidebook for anyone who gardens with Northwest Natives" will be invaluable to all Northwest gardeners.

Learning by Designing

Pacific Northwest Coast Native Indian Art

Author: Jim Gilbert,Karin Clark

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780969297949

Category: Art

Page: 168

View: 4838

This companion manual to Volume 1 puts First Nations art into deeper cultural context, providing Native Indian philosophy, knowledge and skills foundation, code of ethics, and interviews with a contemporary First Nations family, as well as some aspects of historical context and a description of the Potlatch. A full colour, 16-page creation story with 20 designs is included. Additional topics include: contemporary design evolution with 50 examples, 20 designs to draw and paint, and a Quick Reference Chart containing over 100 designs.

Indigenous Beauty

Masterworks of American Indian Art from the Diker Collection

Author: David W. Penney,Janet Catherine Berlo,Bruce Bernstein,Barbara Brotherton,Joseph D. Horse Capture,Susan Secakuku

Publisher: Skira

ISBN: 0847845230

Category: Art

Page: 191

View: 9593

Accompanies an exhibition at the Seattle Art Museum, February 12-May 17, 2015; Amon Carter Museum of American Art, July 5-Sept. 13, 2015; Michael C. Carlos Museum, Emory University, October 8, 2015-January 3, 2016; Toledo Museum of Art, February 14-May 11, 2016.

Indigenous Cities

Urban Indian Fiction and the Histories of Relocation

Author: Laura M. Furlan

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803269331

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 354

View: 8524

"A critical study of contemporary American Indian narratives set in urban spaces that reveals how these texts respond to diaspora, dislocation, citizenship, and reclamation"--

Phantom Past, Indigenous Presence

Native Ghosts in North American Culture and History

Author: Colleen E. Boyd,Coll-Peter Thrush

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803211376

Category: Social Science

Page: 317

View: 9501

The imagined ghosts of Native Americans have been an important element of colonial fantasy in North America ever since European settlements were established in the seventeenth century. Native burial grounds and Native ghosts have long played a role in both regional and local folklore and in the national literature of the United States and Canada, as settlers struggled to create a new identity for themselves that melded their European heritage with their new, North American frontier surroundings. In this interdisciplinary volume, Colleen E. Boyd and Coll Thrush bring together scholars from a variety of fields to discuss this North American fascination with ?the phantom Native American.?ø ø Phantom Past, Indigenous Presence explores the importance of ancestral spirits and historic places in Indigenous and settler communities as they relate to territory and history?in particular cultural, political, social, historical, and environmental contexts. From examinations of how individuals reacted to historical cases of ?hauntings,? to how Native phantoms have functioned in the literature of North Americans, to interdisciplinary studies of how such beliefs and narratives allowed European settlers and Indigenous people to make sense of the legacies of colonialism and conquest, these essays show how the past and the present are intertwined through these stories.