Nationalism and Culture

Author: Rudolf Rocker

Publisher: Black Rose Books Limited

ISBN: 9781551640945

Category: Education

Page: 592

View: 2472

An important contribution to our thought about human society. A classic, long out of print.

Living with Colonialism

Nationalism and Culture in the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan

Author: Heather J. Sharkey

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520929364

Category: History

Page: 245

View: 2981

Histories written in the aftermath of empire have often featured conquerors and peasant rebels but have said little about the vast staffs of locally recruited clerks, technicians, teachers, and medics who made colonialism work day-to-day. Even as these workers maintained the colonial state, they dreamed of displacing imperial power. This book examines the history of the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan (1898-1956) and the Republic of Sudan that followed in order to understand how colonialism worked on the ground, affected local cultures, influenced the rise of nationalism, and shaped the postcolonial nation-state. Relying on a rich cache of Sudanese Arabic literary sources, including poetry, essays, and memoirs, as well as on colonial documents and photographs, this perceptive study examines colonialism from the viewpoint of those who lived and worked in its midst. By integrating the case of Sudan with material on other countries, particularly India, Sharkey gives her book broad comparative appeal. She shows that colonial legacies—such as inflexible borders, atomized multi-ethnic populations, and autocratic governing structures—have persisted, hobbling postcolonial nation-states. Thus countries like Sudan are still living with colonialism, struggling to achieve consensus and stability within borders that a fallen empire has left behind.

Writing Ireland

Colonialism, Nationalism, and Culture

Author: David Cairns,Shaun Richards

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719023729

Category: Civilization, Celtic

Page: 178

View: 9907


Arab Nationalism

The Politics of History and Culture in the Modern Middle East

Author: Peter Wien

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1315412209

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 5928

Arab nationalism has been one of the dominant ideologies in the Middle East and North Africa since the early twentieth century. However, a clear definition of Arab nationalism, even as a subject of scholarly inquiry, does not yet exist. Arab Nationalism sheds light on cultural expressions of Arab nationalism and the sometimes contradictory meanings attached to it in the process of identity formation in the modern world. It presents nationalism as an experienceable set of identity markers – in stories, visual culture, narratives of memory, and struggles with ideology, sometimes in culturally sophisticated forms, sometimes in utterly vulgar forms of expression. Drawing upon various case studies, the book transcends a conventional history that reduces nationalism in the Arab lands to a pattern of political rise and decline. It offers a glimpse at ways in which Arabs have constructed an identifiable shared national culture, and it critically dissects conceptions about Arab nationalism as an easily graspable secular and authoritarian ideology modeled on Western ideas and visions of modernity. This book offers an entirely new portrayal of nationalism and a crucial update to the field, and as such, is indispensable reading for students, scholars and policymakers looking to gain a deeper understanding of nationalism in the Arab world.

The Risorgimento Revisited

Nationalism and Culture in Nineteenth-Century Italy

Author: Silvana Patriarca,Lucy Riall

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 0230248004

Category: History

Page: 303

View: 2706

What was the appeal and the tropes of national-patriotic discourse in nineteenth-century Italy? How did Romanticism intersect with nationalist politics? Why did a young man or woman become a patriot, join a nationalist movement and, if necessary, fight and die for the cause? By addressing these and other questions, the innovative essays of this collection provide fresh and topical perspectives on a central period in modern Italian history. Beside confronting the narrative of 'Risorgimento', its gendered tropes, and the actual experiences of men and women, the authors approach neglected areas of investigation on the Risorgimento - from the relationship between religion and the nation to the connections with the issue of empire and the aspirations of other peoples in the Mediterranean region. An important contribution to our understanding of Italian and more generally European nationalism, this volume also enlightens current discussions about the role of patriotism and the nature of nationalism in present-day Italy.

Nationalism and Ethnicity in a Hindu Kingdom

The Politics of Culture in Contemporary Nepal

Author: David N. Gellner,Joanna Pfaff-Czarnecka,John Whelpton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9057020890

Category: Social Science

Page: 623

View: 3489

With its systematic coverage of different groups, this book demonstrates how similar trends of ethnic formation are affecting all parts of Nepal. Yet, within the boundaries of a single culturally diverse state, very different forms of ethnicity have emerged. " This is a truly thematic collection with a well-defined focus on the important contemporary topics of ethnic identity and nationalism. The importance of the theme is self-evident in a world attempting to come to grips with such problems in virtually all modern states. Anyone with an interest in contemporary Nepal should study this volume." Nepal is the only officially Hindu kingdom in the world and remains so in spite of a revolution, or people's movement, in 1990 which overthrew the partyless Panchayat regime and instituted a multiparty constitutional monarchy. Since November 1994, it has also had an elected Communist government, the first of its kind in South Asia. This volume takes a long-term view of the various processes of ethnic and national development that have been displayed, both before and after 1990. It brings together twelve carefully chosen ethnographic and historical chapters covering all of the major ethnic groups and regions of Nepal.

National Matters

Materiality, Culture, and Nationalism

Author: Geneviève Zubrzycki

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 1503602761

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 5795

National Matters investigates the role of material culture and materiality in defining and solidifying national identity in everyday practice. Examining a range of "things"—from art objects, clay fragments, and broken stones to clothing, food, and urban green space—the contributors to this volume explore the importance of matter in making the nation appear real, close, and important to its citizens. Symbols and material objects do not just reflect the national visions deployed by elites and consumed by the masses, but are themselves important factors in the production of national ideals. Through a series of theoretically grounded and empirically rich case studies, this volume analyzes three key aspects of materiality and nationalism: the relationship between objects and national institutions, the way commonplace objects can shape a national ethos, and the everyday practices that allow individuals to enact and embody the nation. In giving attention to the agency of things and the capacities they afford or foreclose, these cases also challenge the methodological orthodoxies of cultural sociology. Taken together, these essays highlight how the "material turn" in the social sciences pushes conventional understanding of state and nation-making processes in new directions.

Nationalism and the Politics of Culture in Quebec

Author: Richard Handler

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 9780299115142

Category: Political Science

Page: 217

View: 749

Richard Handler's pathbreaking study of nationalistic politics in Quebec is a striking and successful example of the new experimental type of ethnography, interdisciplinary in nature and intensively concerned with rhetoric and not only of anthropologists but also of scholars in a wide range of fields, and it is likely to stir sharp controversy. Bringing together methodologies of history, sociology, political science, and philosophy, as well as anthropology, Handler centers on the period 1976–1984, during which the independantiste Parti Québéois was in control of the provincial government and nationalistic sentiment was especially strong. Handler draws on historical and archival research, and on interviews with Quebec and Canadian government officials, as he addresses the central question: Given the similarities between the epistemologies of both anthropology and nationalist ideology, how can one write an ethnography of nationalism that does not simply reproduce—and thereby endorse—nationalistic beliefs? Handler analyzes various responses to the nationalist vision of a threatened existence. He examines cultural tourism, ideology of the Quebec government, legislations concerning historical preservation, language legislation and policies towards immigrants and “cultural minorities.” He concludes with a thoughtful meditation on the futility of nationalisms.

Dilemmas of Culture in African Schools

Youth, Nationalism, and the Transformation of Knowledge

Author: Cati Coe

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226111315

Category: Education

Page: 241

View: 8773

In working to build a sense of nationhood, Ghana has focused on many social engineering projects, the most meaningful and fascinating of which has been the state's effort to create a national culture through its schools. As Cati Coe reveals in Dilemmas of Culture in African Schools, this effort has created an unusual paradox: while Ghana encourages its educators to teach about local cultural traditions, those traditions are transformed as they are taught in school classrooms. The state version of culture now taught by educators has become objectified and nationalized—vastly different from local traditions. Coe identifies the state's limitations in teaching cultural knowledge and discusses how Ghanaians negotiate the tensions raised by the competing visions of modernity that nationalism and Christianity have created. She reveals how cultural curricula affect authority relations in local social organizations—between teachers and students, between Christians and national elite, and between children and elders—and raises several questions about educational processes, state-society relations, the production of knowledge, and the making of Ghana's citizenry.

Everyday Nationhood

Theorising Culture, Identity and Belonging after Banal Nationalism

Author: Michael Skey,Marco Antonsich

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137570989

Category: Social Science

Page: 339

View: 6518

This edited collection explores the continuing appeal of nationalism around the world. The authors’ ground-breaking research demonstrates the ways in which national priorities and sensibilities frame an extraordinary array of activities, from classroom discussions and social media posts to global policy-making, as well as identifying the value that can come from feeling part of a national community, especially during times of economic uncertainty and social change. They also note how attachments to nation can often generate powerful emotions, happiness and pride as well as anger and frustration, which can be used to mobilize substantial numbers of people into action. Featuring contributions from leading social scientists across a range of disciplines, including sociology, geography, political science, social psychology, media and cultural studies, the book presents a number of case studies covering a range of countries including Russia, USA, New Zealand, Serbia, Japan and Greece. Everyday Nationhood will appeal to students and scholars of nationalism, globalization and identity across the social sciences as well as those with an interest in understanding the role of nationalism in shaping some of the most pressing political crises- migration, economic protectionism, populism - of the contemporary era.

The Politics and Poetics of Authenticity

A Cultural Genealogy of Sinhala Nationalism

Author: Harshana Rambukwella

Publisher: UCL Press

ISBN: 1787351289

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 8663

What is the role of cultural authenticity in the making of nations? Much scholarly and popular commentary on nationalism dismisses authenticity as a romantic fantasy or, worse, a deliberately constructed mythology used for political manipulation. The Politics and Poetics of Authenticity places authenticity at the heart of Sinhala nationalism in late nineteenth and twentieth-century Sri Lanka. It argues that the passion for the ‘real’ or the ‘authentic’ has played a significant role in shaping nationalist thinking and argues for an empathetic yet critical engagement with the idea of authenticity. Through a series of fine-grained and historically grounded analyses of the writings of individual figures central to the making of Sinhala nationalist ideology the book demonstrates authenticity’s rich and varied presence in Sri Lankan public life and its key role in understanding postcolonial nationalism in Sri Lanka and elsewhere in South Asia and the world. It also explores how notions of authenticity shape certain strands of postcolonial criticism and offers a way of questioning the taken-for-granted nature of the nation as a unit of analysis but at the same time critically explore the deep imprint of nations and nationalisms on people's lives.

Global Culture

Nationalism, Globalization and Modernity

Author: Mike Featherstone

Publisher: SAGE Publications Limited

ISBN: 9780803983229

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 6970

In this book leading social scientists from many countries analyze the extent to which we are seeing a globalization of culture. Is a unified world culture emerging? And if so, how does this relate to existing cultural divisions and to the autonomy of the nation state? Differing explanations are offered for trends towards global unification and their relation to an economic world-system. Will the intensification of global contact produce increasing tolerance of other cultures? Or will an integrating culture produce sharper reactions in the form of fundamentalist and nationalist movements? The contributors explore the emergence of `third cultures', such as international law, the financial markets and media conglomerates, as

Slave Culture

Nationalist Theory and the Foundations of Black America

Author: Sterling Stuckey

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199931674

Category: History

Page: 485

View: 6035

An updated edition of the highly acclaimed contribution to African-American scholarship, Slave Culture considers how various African peoples interacted on the plantations of the South to achieve a common culture, tracing of the roots of black nationalist feelings in America over several centuries.

Beyond Belief

India and the Politics of Postcolonial Nationalism

Author: Srirupa Roy

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822389916

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 3908

Beyond Belief is a bold rethinking of the formation and consolidation of nation-state ideologies. Analyzing India during the first two decades following its foundation as a sovereign nation-state in 1947, Srirupa Roy explores how nationalists are turned into nationals, subjects into citizens, and the colonial state into a sovereign nation-state. Roy argues that the postcolonial nation-state is consolidated not, as many have asserted, by efforts to imagine a shared cultural community, but rather by the production of a recognizable and authoritative identity for the state. This project—of making the state the entity identified as the nation’s authoritative representative—emphasizes the natural cultural diversity of the nation and upholds the state as the sole unifier or manager of the “naturally” fragmented nation; the state is unified through diversity. Roy considers several different ways that identification with the Indian nation-state was produced and consolidated during the 1950s and 1960s. She looks at how the Films Division of India, a state-owned documentary and newsreel production agency, allowed national audiences to “see the state”; how the “unity in diversity” formation of nationhood was reinforced in commemorations of India’s annual Republic Day; and how the government produced a policy discourse claiming that scientific development was the ultimate national need and the most pressing priority for the state to address. She also analyzes the fate of the steel towns—industrial townships built to house the workers of nationalized steel plants—which were upheld as the exemplary national spaces of the new India. By prioritizing the role of actual manifestations of and encounters with the state, Roy moves beyond theories of nationalism and state formation based on collective belief.

Anarchism and Anarcho-syndicalism

Author: Rudolf Rocker

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781904491224

Category: Political Science

Page: 48

View: 1423

A new edition of this classic with extensive notes. Rudolph Rocker remains one of the most important figures in the history of anarchism, from his key role organizing against sweatshop labor in London in the 1900s to being the moving spirit behind the founding of the largest ever anarchist international--the IWMA IN 1921. In his later years he tried to chronicle the rise and fall of mass, organised anarchism in Europe. Anarchism and Anarcho-Syndicalism is Rocker's abridged version of his major work Anarcho-Syndicalism and helps to explain where organised anarchism came from. This book's lessons are a must for anyone interested in where it's going.

German Nationalism and Religious Conflict

Culture, Ideology, Politics, 1870-1914

Author: Helmut Walser Smith

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400863899

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 1391

The German Empire of 1871, although unified politically, remained deeply divided along religious lines. In German Nationalism and Religious Conflict, Helmut Walser Smith offers the first social, cultural, and political history of this division. He argues that Protestants and Catholics lived in different worlds, separated by an "invisible boundary" of culture, defined as a community of meaning. As these worlds came into contact, they also came into conflict. Smith explores the local as well as the national dimensions of this conflict, illuminating for the first time the history of the Protestant League as well as the dilemmas involved in Catholic integration into a national culture defined primarily by Protestantism. The author places religious conflict within the wider context of nation-building and nationalism. The ongoing conflict, conditioned by a long history of mutual intolerance, was an integral part of the jagged and complex process by which Germany became a modern, secular, increasingly integrated nation. Consequently, religious conflict also influenced the construction of German national identity and the expression of German nationalism. Smith contends that in this religiously divided society, German nationalism did not simply smooth over tensions between two religious groups, but rather provided them with a new vocabulary for articulating their differences. Nationalism, therefore, served as much to divide as to unite German society. Originally published in 1995. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Blood and Culture

Youth, Right-Wing Extremism, and National Belonging in Contemporary Germany

Author: Cynthia Miller-Idriss

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822391147

Category: Social Science

Page: 253

View: 2446

Over the past decade, immigration and globalization have significantly altered Europe’s cultural and ethnic landscape, foregrounding questions of national belonging. In Blood and Culture, Cynthia Miller-Idriss provides a rich ethnographic analysis of how patterns of national identity are constructed and transformed across generations. Drawing on research she conducted at German vocational schools between 1999 and 2004, Miller-Idriss examines how the working-class students and their middle-class, college-educated teachers wrestle with their different views about citizenship and national pride. The cultural and demographic trends in Germany are broadly indicative of those underway throughout Europe, yet the country’s role in the Second World War and the Holocaust makes national identity, and particularly national pride, a difficult issue for Germans. Because the vocational-school teachers are mostly members of a generation that came of age in the 1960s and 1970s and hold their parents’ generation responsible for National Socialism, many see national pride as symptomatic of fascist thinking. Their students, on the other hand, want to take pride in being German. Miller-Idriss describes a new understanding of national belonging emerging among young Germans—one in which cultural assimilation takes precedence over blood or ethnic heritage. Moreover, she argues that teachers’ well-intentioned, state-sanctioned efforts to counter nationalist pride often create a backlash, making radical right-wing groups more appealing to their students. Miller-Idriss argues that the state’s efforts to shape national identity are always tempered and potentially transformed as each generation reacts to the official conception of what the nation “ought” to be.