Myth, Memory, and Massacre

The Pease River Capture of Cynthia Ann Parker

Author: Paul H. Carlson,Tom Crum

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780896727465

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 6511

"Investigates the so-called 'Battle of Pease River' and December 1860 capture of Cynthia Ann Parker, contending that what became, in Texans' collective memory, a battle that broke Comanche military power was actually a massacre, mainly of women. Questions traditional knowledge and historiographic interpretations of the history of Texas"--Provided by publisher.

Passionate Histories

Myth, Memory and Indigenous Australia

Author: Frances Peters-Little,Ann Curthoys,John Docker

Publisher: ANU E Press

ISBN: 192166665X

Category: Social Science

Page: 324

View: 6486

This book examines the emotional engagements of both Indigenous and Non-Indigenous people with Indigenous history. The contributors are a mix of Indigenous and Non-Indigenous scholars, who in different ways examine how the past lives on in the present, as myth, memory, and history. Each chapter throws fresh light on an aspect of history-making by or about Indigenous people, such as the extent of massacres on the frontier, the myth of Aboriginal male idleness, the controversy over Flynn of the Inland, the meaning of the Referendum of 1967, and the policyand practice of Indigenous child removal.

Legends and Life in Texas

Folklore from the Lone Star State, in Stories and Song

Author: Kenneth L. Untiedt

Publisher: University of North Texas Press

ISBN: 1574417088

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 4189

There is sometimes a fine line between history and folklore. This Publication of the Texas Folklore Society features articles that tell stories about real-life characters from the historical past of Texas, as well as offer personal reflections about life from diverse perspectives throughout the last century. These contributors go beyond merely stating facts about dates or locations or names of the events and people that can be found in court documents or genealogical records; several of these authors provide a very intimate connection to the tales they share. These articles are not just about people that we read about as school children, and they do not merely describe how our culture used to be, or how vastly it has changed; rather, they emphasize the ways we keep our culture alive through the retelling of the events and customs and major figures that are important enough to pass on from one generation to the next. The first section covers legendary characters like Davy Crockett, Mody Boatright, Sam Houston, and Cynthia Ann Parker from our state’s past, as well as people who were bigger or bolder than others, yet seem to have been forgotten. Some of those characters came from different countries, while others are connected directly to our Texas Folklore Society family tree. The second section includes works that examine songs of our youth, as well as the customs and social constructs associated with music, whether it’s on a football field or in a prison yard. The works in the final section recall memories of a simpler time, when cars and home appliances lacked modern conveniences we now take for granted, before Facebook and YouTube allowed us to become Internet movie stars, and when it was a treat just to go and “visit” with family and friends.

The Searchers

The Making of an American Legend

Author: Glenn Frankel

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1620400642

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 5728

In 1836 in East Texas, nine-year-old Cynthia Ann Parker was kidnapped by Comanches. She was raised by the tribe and eventually became the wife of a warrior. Twenty-four years after her capture, she was reclaimed by the U.S. cavalry and Texas Rangers and restored to her white family, to die in misery and obscurity. Cynthia Ann's story has been told and re-told over generations to become a foundational American tale. The myth gave rise to operas and one-act plays, and in the 1950s to a novel by Alan LeMay, which would be adapted into one of Hollywood's most legendary films, The Searchers, "The Biggest, Roughest, Toughest... and Most Beautiful Picture Ever Made!" directed by John Ford and starring John Wayne. Glenn Frankel, beginning in Hollywood and then returning to the origins of the story, creates a rich and nuanced anatomy of a timeless film and a quintessentially American myth. The dominant story that has emerged departs dramatically from documented history: it is of the inevitable triumph of white civilization, underpinned by anxiety about the sullying of white women by "savages." What makes John Ford's film so powerful, and so important, Frankel argues, is that it both upholds that myth and undermines it, baring the ambiguities surrounding race, sexuality, and violence in the settling of the West and the making of America.

The My Lai Massacre in American History and Memory

Author: Kendrick Oliver

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719068911

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 4564

On 16 March 1968, two US infantry companies entered a Vietnamese village and in the course of a single morning killed over 400 of its unarmed, unresisting inhabitants . . . This is the first book to examine the response of American society to the My Lai massacre and its ambiguous place in American national memory. Kendrick Oliver argues that the massacre revelations left many Americans untroubled. It was only when the soldiers most immediately responsible came to be tried that opposition to the conflict grew, for these prosecutions were regarded by supporters of the war as evidence that the national leaders no longer had the will to do what was necessary to win. Oliver goes on to show that, contrary to interpretations of the Vietnam conflict as an unhealed national trauma or wound, many Americans have assimilated the war and its violence rather too well, and they were able to do so even when that violence was most conspicuous and current. US soldiers have been presented as the conflict's principal victims, and this was true even in the case of My Lai. It was the American perpetrators of the massacre and not the Vietnamese they brutalized who became the central object of popular concern. Both the massacre and its reception reveal the problem of human empathy in conditions of a counter-revolutionary war - a war, moreover, that had always been fought for geopolitical credibility, not for the sake of the Vietnamese. This incisive enquiry into the moral history of the Vietnam war should be essential reading for all students of the conflict, as well as others interested in the war and its cultural legacies.

Discovering Texas History

Author: Bruce A. Glasrud,Light Townsend Cummins,Cary D. Wintz

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806147830

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 1981

The most comprehensive and up-to-date guide to Texas historiography of the past quarter-century, this volume of original essays will be an invaluable resource and definitive reference for teachers, students, and researchers of Texas history. Conceived as a follow-up to the award-winning A Guide to the History of Texas (1988), Discovering Texas History focuses on the major trends in the study of Texas history since 1990. In two sections, arranged topically and chronologically, some of the most prominent authors in the field survey the major works and most significant interpretations in the historical literature. Topical essays take up historical themes ranging from Native Americans, Mexican Americans, African Americans, and women in Texas to European immigrant history; literature, the visual arts, and music in the state; and urban and military history. Chronological essays cover the full span of Texas historiography from the Spanish era through the Civil War, to the Progressive Era and World Wars I and II, and finally to the early twenty-first century. Critical commentary on particular books and articles is the unifying purpose of these contributions, whose authors focus on analyzing and summarizing the subjects that have captured the attention of professional historians in recent years. Together the essays gathered here will constitute the standard reference on Texas historiography for years to come, guiding readers and researchers to future, ever deeper discoveries in the history of Texas.

John Brown in Memory and Myth

Author: Michael Daigh

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786496177

Category: History

Page: 268

View: 9914

John Brown's father on the day of his birth, May 9, 1800, wrote "John was born one hundred years after his great grandfather. Nothing else very uncommon." Many years later came the 1856 Pottawatomie Massacre, where his uncommon convictions led him and his band of abolitionists to kill five pro-slavery settlers in Franklin County, Kansas. Three years later, Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry and his subsequent trial and execution helped pushed an already divided nation inexorably toward civil war. This is the story of John Brown, the age he embodied and the myth he became, and how the tragic gravity of his actions transformed America's past and future. Through biographical narrative, his life and legacy are discussed as a study in metaphor and power and the nature of historical memory.

Miracles and Massacres

True and Untold Stories of the Making of America

Author: Glenn Beck,Kevin Balfe,Hannah Beck

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1476764743

Category: History

Page: 290

View: 9226

Details some of the little-known stories from American history that explain the American identity and where the country is headed in the future.

The Memory of Catastrophe

Author: Peter Gray,Kendrick Oliver

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719063459

Category: History

Page: 225

View: 8776

Memories of catastrophes - those which occur naturally and those which are consequences of human actions - loom large in the modern consciousness. This volume draws on the latest scholarship to investigate this phenomenon in both contemporary and historical contexts.

Memory, History, Nation

Contested Pasts

Author: Katharine Hodgkin,Susannah Radstone

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN: 9781412804882

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 5618

The chapters in Memory, History, Nation, written by international scholars, offer a complex awareness of the workings of memory, and the ways in which different or changing histories may be explained. They explore the relation between individual and social memory, between real and imaginary, event and fantasy, history and myth. Contradictory accounts, or memories in direct contradiction to the historical record are not always the sign of a repressive authority attempting to cover something up. The tension between memory as a safeguard against attempts to silence dissenting voices, and memorys own implication in that silencing, runs throughout the book.

Co-Memory and Melancholia

Israelis Memorialising the Palestinian Nakba

Author: Ronit Lentin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1847793223

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 5270

The 1948 war that led to the creation of the State of Israel also resulted in the destruction of Palestinian society when some 80 per cent of the Palestinians who lived in the major part of Palestine upon which Israel was established became refugees. Israelis call the 1948 war their 'War of Independence' and the Palestinians their 'Nakba', or catastrophe. After many years of Nakba denial, land appropriation, political discrimination against the Palestinians within Israel and the denial of rights to Palestinian refugees, in recent years the Nakba is beginning to penetrate Israeli public discourse. This book explores the construction of collective memory in Israeli society, where the memory of the trauma of the Holocaust and of Israel's war dead competes with the memory claims of the dispossessed Palestinians. Taking an auto-ethnographic approach, Ronit Lentin makes a contribution to social memory studies through a critical evaluation of the co-memoration of the Palestinian Nakba by Israeli Jews. Against a background of the Israeli resistance movement, Lentin's central argument is that co-memorating the Nakba by Israeli Jews is motivated by an unresolved melancholia about the disappearance of Palestine and the dispossession of the Palestinians, a melancholia that shifts mourning from the lost object to the grieving subject. Lentin theorises Nakba co-memory as a politics of resistance, counterpoising co-memorative practices by internally displaced Israeli Palestinians with Israeli Jewish discourses of the Palestinian right of return, and questions whether return narratives by Israeli Jews, courageous as they may seem, are ultimately about Israeli Jewish self-healing rather than justice for Palestine.

The Civil War Guerrilla

Unfolding the Black Flag in History, Memory, and Myth

Author: Joseph M. Beilein Jr.,Matthew C. Hulbert

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813165334

Category: History

Page: 258

View: 7779

Most Americans are familiar with major Civil War battles such as Manassas (Bull Run), Shiloh, and Gettysburg, which have been extensively analyzed by generations of historians. However, not all of the war's engagements were fought in a conventional manner by regular forces. Often referred to as "the wars within the war," guerrilla combat touched states from Virginia to New Mexico. Guerrillas fought for the Union, the Confederacy, their ethnic groups, their tribes, and their families. They were deadly forces that plundered, tortured, and terrorized those in their path, and their impact is not yet fully understood. In this richly diverse volume, Joseph M. Beilein Jr. and Matthew C. Hulbert assemble a team of both rising and eminent scholars to examine guerrilla warfare in the South during the Civil War. Together, they discuss irregular combat as practiced by various communities in multiple contexts, including how it was used by Native Americans, the factors that motivated raiders in the border states, and the women who participated as messengers, informants, collaborators, and combatants. They also explore how the Civil War guerrilla has been mythologized in history, literature, and folklore. The Civil War Guerrilla sheds new light on the ways in which thousands of men, women, and children experienced and remembered the Civil War as a conflict of irregular wills and tactics. Through thorough research and analysis, this timely book provides readers with a comprehensive examination of the guerrilla soldier and his role in the deadliest war in U.S. history.

Der begrabene Riese

Author: Kazuo Ishiguro

Publisher: Karl Blessing Verlag

ISBN: 3641153263

Category: Fiction

Page: 416

View: 2335

Der lang erwartete neue Roman des britischen Bestsellerautors Britannien im 5. Jahrhundert: Nach erbitterten Kriegen zwischen den Volksstämmen der Briten und Angelsachsen ist das Land verwüstet. Axl und Beatrice sind seit vielen Jahren ein Paar. In ihrem Dorf gelten sie als Außenseiter, und man gibt ihnen deutlich zu verstehen, dass sie eine Belastung für die Gemeinschaft sind. Also verlassen sie ihre Heimat in der Hoffnung, ihren Sohn zu finden, den sie seit langer Zeit nicht mehr gesehen haben. Ihre Reise ist voller überraschender Begegnungen und Gefahren, und bald ahnen sie, dass in ihrem Land eine Veränderung heraufzieht, die alles aus dem Gleichgewicht bringen wird, sogar ihre Beziehung. Ein gewaltiger, intensiver, spannender Roman, der uns mitnimmt auf eine so tiefgründige wie faszinierende Reise. Kazuo Ishiguros unprätentiöser und zugleich betörender Realismus macht ihn zu einem feinsinnigen Meister des Erzählens.

Communication, Culture and Confrontation

Author: Bernard Bel,Jan Brouwer,Biswajit Das,Vibodh Parthasarathi,Guy Poitevin

Publisher: SAGE Publications India

ISBN: 8132104862

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 504

View: 7680

The third and final volume in the series on Communication Processes, Communication, Culture and Confrontation is a bold attempt at breaking conceptual and methodological impasses which stifle communication studies. Departing from established frameworks and dated technological metaphors such as 'transmission', the present volume explores and analyzes different forms of communication media in relation to the cultural configurations and contending forces that permeate them. Positioned at the interface of culture and communication studies, the discourse in the book engages with multiple voices, bringing together academic scholars and grassroot social animators. Exploring seven different popular cultural forms, such as rituals, songs, narratives, calendar art, pamphlets, and so on, through 18 case studies, it goes on to suggest a complex model of communication. In this framework, cultures cannot be viewed as items exchanged in the hegemonic space of global communication. Cultural configurations display themselves as 'evolutive' forms of social communication that weave human beings into collectives and bind these collectives with one another—all permeated with the power parameter. Cultures 'perform' viable collectives when they come to be apprehended in a field of contending forces: a milieu of exchange, encounter, confrontation and possibly conflict. This volume will be invaluable for students of communication, culture studies, sociology and journalism.

Forgeries of Memory and Meaning

Blacks and the Regimes of Race in American Theater and Film before World War II

Author: Cedric J. Robinson

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469606755

Category: Social Science

Page: 456

View: 2433

Cedric J. Robinson offers a new understanding of race in America through his analysis of theater and film of the early twentieth century. He argues that economic, political, and cultural forces present in the eras of silent film and the early "talkies" firmly entrenched limited representations of African Americans. Robinson grounds his study in contexts that illuminate the parallel growth of racial beliefs and capitalism, beginning with Shakespearean England and the development of international trade. He demonstrates how the needs of American commerce determined the construction of successive racial regimes that were publicized in the theater and in motion pictures, particularly through plantation and jungle films. In addition to providing new depth and complexity to the history of black representation, Robinson examines black resistance to these practices. Whereas D. W. Griffith appropriated black minstrelsy and romanticized a national myth of origins, Robinson argues that Oscar Micheaux transcended uplift films to create explicitly political critiques of the American national myth. Robinson's analysis marks a new way of approaching the intellectual, political, and media racism present in the beginnings of American narrative cinema.

Der lange Weg zur Freiheit

Autobiographie

Author: Nelson Mandela

Publisher: S. Fischer Verlag

ISBN: 3104031541

Category: History

Page: 864

View: 4905

»Ich bin einer von ungezählten Millionen, die durch Nelson Mandelas Leben inspiriert wurden.« Barack Obama Eine fast drei Jahrzehnte währende Gefängnishaft ließ Nelson Mandela zum Mythos der schwarzen Befreiungsbewegung werden. Kaum ein anderer Politiker unserer Zeit symbolisiert heute in solchem Maße die Friedenshoffnungen der Menschheit und den Gedanken der Aussöhnung aller Rassen wie der ehemalige südafrikanische Präsident und Friedensnobelpreisträger. Auch nach seinem Tod finden seine ungebrochene Charakterstärke und Menschenfreundlichkeit die Bewunderung aller friedenswilligen Menschen auf der Welt. Mandelas Lebensgeschichte ist über die politische Bedeutung hinaus ein spannend zu lesendes, kenntnis- und faktenreiches Dokument menschlicher Entwicklung unter Bedingungen und Fährnissen, vor denen die meisten Menschen innerlich wie äußerlich kapituliert haben dürften.