Music Direction for the Stage

A View from the Podium

Author: Joseph Church

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199993416

Category: Music

Page: 392

View: 1918

JOSEPH CHURCH is best known for his work as music director and supervisor of two groundbreaking Broadway musicals, The Who's Tommy and The Lion King. He has worked on countless other productions as music director, conductor, keyboardist, and/or arranger, on and Off-Broadway, nationwide, and worldwide, among them, In The Heights, Sister Act, Les Miserables, Little Shop Of Horrors, Randy Newman's Faust, and Radio City's Christmas Spectacular. Also an active composer, he has written for film, television, the concert stage, and over thirty plays and musicals.

Shakespeare

Author: Gabriel Egan

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748630163

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 9147

This book helps the reader make sense of the most commonly studied writer in the world. It starts with a brief explanation of how Shakespeare's writings have come down to us as a series of scripts for actors in the early modern theatre industry of London. The main chapters of the book approach the texts through a series of questions: 'what's changed since Shakespeare's time?', 'to what uses has Shakespeare been put?', and 'what value is there in Shakespeare?' These questions go to the heart of why we study Shakespeare at all, which question the book encourages the readers to answer for themselves in relation to their own critical writing.

Ancient Drama in Music for the Modern Stage

Author: Peter Brown,Suzana Suzana OgrajenŠek

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191610941

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 8414

Opera was invented at the end of the sixteenth century in imitation of the supposed style of delivery of ancient Greek tragedy, and, since then, operas based on Greek drama have been among the most important in the repertoire. This collection of essays by leading authorities in the fields of Classics, Musicology, Dance Studies, English Literature, Modern Languages, and Theatre Studies provides an exceptionally wide-ranging and detailed overview of the relationship between the two genres. Since tragedies have played a much larger part than comedies in this branch of operatic history, the volume mostly concentrates on the tragic repertoire, but a chapter on musical versions of Aristophanes' Lysistrata is included, as well as discussions of incidental music, a very important part of the musical reception of ancient drama, from Andrea Gabrieli in 1585 to Harrison Birtwistle and Judith Weir in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.

Johann Strauss' DIE FLEDERMAUS Opera Journeys Mini Guide

Author: Burton D. Fisher

Publisher: Opera Journeys Publishing

ISBN: 1930841531

Category: Electronic books

Page: 34

View: 4652

A comprehensive guide to Johann Strauss' DIE FLEDERMAUS, featuring Principal Characters in the opera, Brief Story Synopsis, Story Narrative with Music Highlight Examples, and an insightful and in depth Commentary and Analysis by Burton D. Fisher, noted opera author and lecturer.

Johann Strauss' Die Fledermaus

Author: Burton D. Fisher

Publisher: Opera Journeys Publishing

ISBN: 1102009083

Category:

Page: 32

View: 6539

Burton D. Fisher's extremely popular Mini Guides feature Principal Characters in the Opera, Brief Story Synopsis, Story Narrative with Music Highlight Examples, and an insightful and in depth Commentary and Analysis of the opera.

Writing Interactive Music for Video Games

A Composer's Guide

Author: Michael Sweet

Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional

ISBN: 0133563510

Category: Computers

Page: 512

View: 7809

“This book is a must read for newcomers and experienced composers wanting to learn more about the art of video game composition.” —Chuck Doud, Director of Music, Sony Computer Entertainment Worldwide Studios All You Need to Know to Create Great Video Game Music Written by the developer of Berklee School of Music’s pioneering game scoring program, this guide covers everything professional composers and music students need to know about composing interactive music for video games, and contains exclusive tools for interactive scoring—tools that were previously available only at Berklee. Drawing on twenty years of professional experience in the game industry, Michael Sweet helps you master the unique language of music storytelling in games. Next, he walks you through the entire music composition process, from initial conceptualization and creative direction through implementation. Inside, you’ll find dozens of examples that illustrate adaptive compositional techniques, from small downloadable games to multimillion dollar console titles. In addition, this guide covers the business side of video game composition, sharing crucial advice about contracts, pricing, sales, and marketing. Coverage includes Overcoming the unique challenges of writing for games Composing music that can adapt in real time to player actions Developing thematic ideas Using audio middleware to create advanced interactive scores Working effectively with game development teams Understanding the life of a video game composer Managing contracts, rights, estimating, and negotiation Finding work The companion website contains software tools to help you master interactive music concepts explored in this book, with additional resources and links to learn more about scoring for games. See Appendix A for details.

The Sense of Music

Semiotic Essays

Author: Raymond Monelle

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400824038

Category: Music

Page: 336

View: 4084

The fictional Dr. Strabismus sets out to write a new comprehensive theory of music. But music's tendency to deconstruct itself combined with the complexities of postmodernism doom him to failure. This is the parable that frames The Sense of Music, a novel treatment of music theory that reinterprets the modern history of Western music in the terms of semiotics. Based on the assumption that music cannot be described without reference to its meaning, Raymond Monelle proposes that works of the Western classical tradition be analyzed in terms of temporality, subjectivity, and topic theory. Critical of the abstract analysis of musical scores, Monelle argues that the score does not reveal music's sense. That sense--what a piece of music says and signifies--can be understood only with reference to history, culture, and the other arts. Thus, music is meaningful in that it signifies cultural temporalities and themes, from the traditional manly heroism of the hunt to military power to postmodern "polyvocality." This theoretical innovation allows Monelle to describe how the Classical style of the eighteenth century--which he reads as a balance of lyric and progressive time--gave way to the Romantic need for emotional realism. He argues that irony and ambiguity subsequently eroded the domination of personal emotion in Western music as well as literature, killing the composer's subjectivity with that of the author. This leaves Dr. Strabismus suffering from the postmodern condition, and Raymond Monelle with an exciting, controversial new approach to understanding music and its history.

For the Love of Music

Author: Allison McKnight

Publisher: FriesenPress

ISBN: 1770973680

Category: Fiction

Page: 192

View: 4836

When Nicki runs into Jonathan, the lead-singer of the band Black Diamond, during a weekend in New York City she asks him for his autograph. To her delight does she not only get his autograph, he asks her out for drinks and dinner the next night. Still, she never had dreamt that they would meet again, but a week later he invites her to a concert in Dallas. After that they meet in California, London and even spent a weekend together in Paris. Although Jonathan is separated from his wife, things are complicated and after Jonathan's daughter is injured later that summer, he has no choice but to go back to his family to support them during this time and he tells Nicki to move on. Nicki struggles but finally realizes that she has no choice but to pick up the pieces of her life. Until they meet again in New York.....

The Historical Performance of Music

An Introduction

Author: Colin Lawson,Robin Stowell

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521627382

Category: Music

Page: 219

View: 9292

Offering students and performers a concise overview of historical performance, this 1999 book takes into account the many significant developments in the discipline. It addresses practical matters rather than philosophical issues and guides readers towards further investigation and interpretation of the evidence provided, not only in the various early instrumental and vocal treatises, but also in examples from the mainstream repertory. Designed as a parent volume for the series Cambridge Handbooks to the Historical Performance of Music, this book provides an historical basis for artistic decision-making which has as its goal the re-creation of performances as close as possible to the composer's original conception. It relates many of the issues discussed to major works by Bach, Mozart, Berlioz and Brahms, composed c.1700–c.1900, the core period which forms the principal (though not exclusive) focus for the whole series.

The Shakespeare Company, 1594-1642

Author: Andrew Gurr

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521807302

Category: Drama

Page: 339

View: 8239

This is the first complete history of the theatre company, created in 1594, which in 1603 became the King's Men. Shakespeare was at the heart of the team of players, who with their successors ran an operation that lasted until the theatres closed in 1642. During those forty-eight years they staged all of Shakespeare's plays, a number of Ben Jonson's, those of Thomas Middleton and John Webster, and almost all of the Beaumont and Fletcher canon. Andrew Gurr provides a comprehensive history of the company's activities. A chapter on their finances explains the unique management system they adopted and two chapters study the fashions in their repertory and the complex relationships with their royal patrons. The 6 appendixes identify the 99 players who worked in the company and the 168 plays they are known to have owned and performed, as well as the key documents from the company's history.

Antony and Cleopatra

Author: William Shakespeare,Tony Farrell

Publisher: Nelson Thornes

ISBN: 9780748786022

Category: Drama

Page: 208

View: 4487

This student book contains extensive notes and well-placed illustrations, providing clear explanations of words and phrases. It provides just the right balance for the study of language, imagery and theatricality, and of character and context, enabling students to gain a clear understanding of the text.

Restoration Comedy in Performance

Author: J. L. Styan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521274210

Category: Drama

Page: 271

View: 1339

Restoration comedy disappeared from the stage for nearly 200 years until it was revived early this century. Without the benefit of a performance tradition has suffered from an inappropriate literary and moralistic criticism which continues to this day. Yet this brilliant court and coterie comedy of sexual and social behaviour was an extraordinary success in its own time, and enjoys a unique place in theatrical history as an example of the interplay possible between the stage and the audience. In this book John Styan persuades us that only through a performance approach to the great plays of Etherege, Wycherley, Dryden, Shadwell, Vanbrugh, Congreve and Farquhar can we recover a sense of their value. Restoration Comedy in Performance is liberally illustrated with contemporary drawings and modern photographs, and it draws extensively upon documentary and visual evidence of the seventeenth century in order to suggest the importance of the costume and customs, manners and behaviour of the age to an understanding of the sort of theatre and drama it produced. Professor Styan also discusses the problems encountered in the early attempts to revive the comedies in the twentieth century, and pauses frequently in order to offer a descriptive account of a moment of staging or to recreate a scene or a sequence of comic repartee or action. The book aims to bring back to life, therefore, something of a lost art form, not as a piece of conventional stage or production history, but as a true attempt to recognize the virtues of Restoration comedy as a performing art.

Untwisting the Serpent

Modernism in Music, Literature, and Other Arts

Author: Daniel Albright

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226012544

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 395

View: 1943

Modernist art often seems to give more frustration than pleasure to its audience. Daniel Albright shows that this perception arises partly because we usually consider each art form in isolation, rather than collaboration.

The Theatre of Tennessee Williams

Author: Brenda Murphy

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408145332

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 8104

Perfect for students of English Literature, Theatre Studies and American Studies at college and university, The Theatre of Tennessee Williams provides a lucid and stimulating analysis of Willams' dramatic work by one of America's leading scholars. With the centennial of his birth celebrated amid a flurry of conferences devoted to his work in 2011, and his plays a central part of any literature and drama curriculum and uibiquitous in theatre repertoires, he remains a giant of twentieth century literature and drama. In Brenda Murphy's major study of his work she examines his life and career and provides an analysis of more than a score of his key plays, including in-depth studies of major works such as A Streetcar Named Desire, The Glass Menagerie, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and others. She traces the artist figure who features in many of Williams' plays to broaden the discussion beyond the normal reference points. As with other volumes in Methuen Drama's Critical Companions series, this book features too essays by Bruce McConachie, John S. Bak, Felicia Hardison Londré and Annette Saddik, offering perspectives on different aspects of Williams' work that will assist students in their own critical thinking.

Understanding The Tempest

A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historical Documents

Author: Faith Nostbakken

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313328732

Category: Drama

Page: 195

View: 9780

While "The Tempest" has always been one of Shakespeare's most entertaining and enchanting plays, it continues to stir up passionate debate throughout the world because of its ideas and attitudes toward race, class, political power, and colonialism. This casebook systematically examines these issues, as well as several others, from dramatic and historical perspectives and through parallel contemporary applications. Readers are first introduced to the play with a dramatic analysis that situates the work within Shakespeare's canon and within the romantic tradition. This fresh interpretation also casts much light on the use of imagery and language in setting, character, and thematic development. This casebook draws on the themes and issues introduced, and examines each one in turn with insightful original essays and primary documents. The shipwreck that sets the play in motion is examined in terms of the discovery of the new world, and the prevailing attitudes toward colonialism. A brief chronology of New World events helps situate the historical excerpts. Another intriguing topic explored in the casebook is the diverging Elizabethan views on science and religion, with a particular focus on the role of magic. Primary documents that help readers appreciate the significance of matters of sorcery and the supernatural include excerpts from Reginald Scott's 1584 "The Discovery of Witchcraft, " James I's "Demonology" (1597) as well as Marlowe's "Doctor Faustus." Other topic chapters examine political power and treachery, as well as society in terms of marriage and the court. A full chapter is also devoted to performance and interpretation of the play. The final Contemporary Applications section investigates current global concerns that parallel those in the play, and help readers appreciate Shakespeare's play in relation to the world around us. Readers are shown dramatically contrasting perspectives on colonialism in Zimbawe. The casebook concludes with a fascinating discussion of the parallel elements of fantasy in "The Tempest" and in literary works by popular contemporary writers J.R.R. Tolkien and J. K. Rowling. Understanding "The Tempest" follows the successful casebook format developed specifically for the "Literature in Context" series. Following a dramatic analysis, each topic chapter presents an important historical issue in the play, with insightful narrative essays supported by primary documents. In several chapters, brief chronologies of significant related events help readers understand the historical context of the play and its thematic concerns. As a tool for student research and classroom work, educators will appreciate the numerous topics for written and oral discussion suggested at the conclusion of each unit. Suggested readings further complement the content and research applications of the casebook.

A Life in Music

Author: Daniel Barenboim,Michael Lewin,Phillip Huscher

Publisher: Arcade Publishing

ISBN: 9781559706742

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 246

View: 6382

Traces five decades of the career of the virtuoso conductor, describing his work with some of the twentieth century's most distinguished musicians, his most noted performances, and his travels throughout the world. 20,000 first printing.

From the Stage to the Studio

How Fine Musicians Become Great Teachers

Author: Cornelia Watkins,Laurie Scott

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199911479

Category: Music

Page: 320

View: 5866

"The fact is, you will teach." from the Foreword by Stephen Clapp, Dean Emeritus, The Julliard School. Whether serving on the faculty at a university, maintaining a class of private students, or fulfilling an invitation as guest artist in a master class series, virtually all musicians will teach during their careers. From the Stage to the Studio speaks directly to the performing musician, highlighting the significant advantages of becoming distinguished both as a performer and a pedagogue. Drawing on over sixty years of combined experience, authors Cornelia Watkins and Laurie Scott provide the guidance and information necessary for any musician to translate his or her individual approach into productive and rewarding teacher-student interactions. Premised on the synergistic relationship between teaching and performing, this book provides a structure for clarifying the essential elements of musical artistry, and connects them to such tangible situations as setting up a studio, teaching a master class, interviewing for a job, judging competitions, and recruiting students. From the Stage to the Studio serves as an essential resource for university studio faculty, music pedagogy teachers, college music majors, and professionals looking to add effective teaching to their artistic repertoire.

Music in Shakespearean Tragedy

Author: F W Sternfeld

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136569162

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 384

View: 6277

First published in 1963. When originally published this book was the first to treat at full length the contribution which music makes to Shakespeare's great tragedies, among them Hamlet, Othello, and King Lear. Here the playwright's practices are studied in conjunction with those of his contemporaries: Marlowe and Jonson, Marston and Chapman. From these comparative assessments there emerges the method that is peculiar to Shakespeare: the employment of song and instrumental music to a degree hitherto unknown, and their use as an integral part of the dramatic structure.