Mexican Americans in Los Angeles

Author: Alex Moreno Areyan

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738580067

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 536

Mexican Americans established and nurtured the foundation, fiber, and fabric of Los Angeles since the first pobladores arrived in 1781. Pride in family, work, community, and religion coalesces into their legacy from East Los Angeles to the San Fernando Valley to the port areas of Wilmington and San Pedro. Men and women of Mexican heritage comprised 47 percent of Los Angeles County's Latino population in the 21st century. The modern Mexican American saga is embodied in the success of Congressman Edward Roybal, Congresswoman Lucille Roybal Allard, dynamic civic leader Dionicio Morales, and Los Angeles County supervisor Gloria Molina. Labor leader Cesar Chavez instilled passion and hope, while prizefighters Art Aragon, Paul Gonzalez, and Oscar De La Hoya and actors Anthony Quinn, Katy Jurado, Ricardo Montalban, and Edward James Olmos provided inspiration. The city's first Mexican American mayor in more than a century, Antonio Villaraigosa, was elected in 2005. This book is a distillation of a proud people's contributions to, and achievements in, a great city.

Mexican American Baseball in Los Angeles

Author: Francisco E. Balderrama,Richard A. Santillan

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738581804

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 127

View: 5343

Images of Baseball: Mexican American Baseball in Los Angeles celebrates the flourishing culture of the great pastime in East Los Angeles and other communities where a strong sense of Mexican identity and pride was fostered in a sporting atmosphere of both fierce athleticism and social celebration. From 1900, with the establishment of the Mexican immigrant community, to the rise of Fernandomania in the 1980s, baseball diamonds in greater Los Angeles were both proving grounds for youth as they entered their educations and careers, and the foundation for the talented Forty-Sixty Club, comprised of players of at least 40, and often over 60, years of age. These evocative photographs look back on the great Mexican American teams and players of the 20th century, including the famous Chorizeros--the proclaimed "Yankees of East L.A."

Mexican Americans in Redlands

Author: Antonio Gonzalez Vasquez,Genevieve Carpio

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738595225

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 127

View: 3314

Redlands has long been home to a large Mexican native and immigrant population that was central to both its booming citrus industry and community life. Images of America: Mexican Americans in Redlands is a journey through this vital, vibrant, and often overlooked culture. Follow longtime residents as they tell their personal stories, share rarely seen photographs, and recall life in the self-proclaimed "City of Millionaires." Experience early Redlands through the eyes of Epimenio Guzman, a blacksmith and musician who came from Los Angeles in 1885 to pursue his trade. Imagine arriving in 1913 when a group of 12 families from Northern Mexico chose Redlands to build the first Spanish-language church in the region. Join young Mexican men and women from Redlands who, through times of war and peace, sacrificed deeply, even giving their lives at times, for the right to be both Mexican and American. These and other stories within are based on the Redlands Oral History Project, a collection of conversations with and images of Mexican Americans throughout the East San Bernardino Valley.

Mexican American Boxing in Los Angeles

Author: Gene Aguilera

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1467130893

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 3106

Welcome to the colorful, flamboyant, and wonderful world of Mexican American boxing in Los Angeles. From the minute they stepped into the ring, Mexican American fighters have electrified fans with their explosiveness and courage. These historical images bring to life a sociological culture consisting of knockouts, the Main Street Gym, the Olympic Auditorium, neighborhood rivalries, Mexican idols, posters, and promoters. Like a winding thread, "the Golden Boy" Art Aragon bobs and weaves throughout the book. From "Mexican" Joe Rivers to Oscar De La Hoya, the true stories of their sensational ring wars are told while keeping alive the spirit and legacy of Mexican American boxing from the greater Los Angeles area.

Mexican Americans in Redondo Beach and Hermosa Beach

Author: Alex Moreno Areyan

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738546995

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 2009

The century-old presence of Mexican Americans in Redondo Beach and Hermosa Beach is an important, colorful part of the history of Los Angeles County's South Bay region. This evocative pictorial history documents the ways in which this group left significant marks on the economic, agricultural, academic, religious, professional, and governmental fabric of both communities. World War II heroes, star athletes, lawyers, professors, teachers, city councilmen, a judge, an astrophysicist, and many other professionals have come from this heritage. The first known Mexican American in Redondo Beach was Mauro Gonzales, who arrived in 1900 to unload ships at the city's old wooden pier. He was followed in 1910 by Domingo Moreno, who fostered 12 children, and Mauricio Colin, who had 13, after they escaped the Mexican Revolution. They initiated a large and vibrant Mexican American community, one that has virtually been ignored by conventional histories.

Mexican Americans in Wilmington

Author: Olivia Cueva-Fernandez

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738581743

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 3440

Under Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. flags, the Los Angeles harbor area has developed many industries and businesses that survived on Mexican labor, supporting families of Mexican origin for more than a century. Pioneering Mexican Americans have worked the railroads, fields, canneries, plants, refineries, waterfront, and family-owned businesses for generations, forming strong bonds and lifelong friendships. Active in the military and sports, as well as involved in the church and community, Mexican Americans have overcome poverty, hardships, and discrimination, retained cultural values and customs, intermarried and assimilated with other cultures, and become the largest ethnic group in Wilmington. Many of the early families still have relatives that live and work in Wilmington, with sons and daughters achieving successful careers in various realms. Through education, hard work, and determination, Wilmington's Mexican Americans have contributed extensively to the harbor's vibrant American way of life.

Mexican American Baseball in East Los Angeles

Author: Richard A. Santillán,Richard Peña,Teresa M. Santillán,Al Padilla,Bob Lagunas

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1439659109

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 128

View: 6785

Mexican American Baseball in East Los Angeles highlights the unforgettable teams, players, and coaches who graced the hallowed fields of East Los Angeles between 1917 and 2016 and brought immense joy and honor to their neighborhoods. Off the field, these players and their families helped create the multibillion-dollar wealth that depended on their backbreaking labor. More than a game, baseball and softball were political instruments designed to promote and empower civil, political, cultural, and gender rights, confronting head-on the reactionary forces of prejudice, intolerance, sexism, and xenophobia. A century later, baseball and softball are more popular than ever in East Los Angeles. Dedicated coaches still produce gifted players and future community leaders. These breathtaking photographs and heartfelt stories shed unparalleled light to the long and rich history of baseball and softball in the largest Mexican American community in the United States.

Mexican American Baseball in the Inland Empire

Author: Richard A. Santillan,Mark A. Ocegueda,Terry A. Cannon,Jose M. Alamillo

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738593168

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 4032

Mexican American Baseball in the Inland Empire celebrates the thriving culture of former teams from Pomona, Ontario, Cucamonga, Chino, Claremont, San Bernardino, Colton, Riverside, Corona, Beaumont, and the Coachella Valley. From the early 20th century through the 1950s, baseball diamonds in the Inland Empire provided unique opportunities for nurturing athletic and educational skills, ethnic identity, and political self-determination for Mexican Americans during an era of segregation. Legendary men's and women's teams--such as the Corona Athletics, San Bernardino's Mitla Café, the Colton Mercuries, and Las Debs de Corona--served as an important means for Mexican American communities to examine civil and educational rights and offer valuable insight on social, cultural, and gender roles. These evocative photographs recall the often-neglected history of Mexican American barrio baseball clubs of the Inland Empire.

Farming in Torrance and the South Bay

Author: Judith Gerber

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738559308

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 3333

Jared Sydney Torrance originally founded Torrance in 1912 as an industrial city. But the land and its surrounding South Bay region thrived through agricultural activities, beginning in 1784 on the Rancho San Pedro. Farming activities continued after Ben Weston became the first one to buy land from the Dominguez family's rancho in 1847. Farming remained an important part of city commerce in the transition to a thriving Los Angeles County suburb in the late 1950s. Throughout those early years, family farmers contributed to the city's economy by raising cattle, pigs, and turkeys, as well as sugar beets, alfalfa, beans, hay, oats, barley, and flowers, and operating dairy farms. Other South Bay cities also relied on agriculture for economic growth, including Carson, once home to a thriving cut-flower farm industry, and Gardena, the one-time berry capital of Southern California, as well as the Palos Verdes Peninsula, where dry farming was a successful industry.

Los Angeles's Boyle Heights

Author: Japanese American National Museum

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738530154

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 6205

Boyle Heights was one of the earliest residential areas outside of Los Angeles's original pueblo. From the 1920s through the 1950s, it was the city's most ethnically heterogeneous neighborhood with residents coming from such far-flung places as Mexico, Japan, England, Germany, Russia, and Armenia, as well as from the eastern, southern, and southwestern United States. Over the years, Boyle Heights has continued to be a focal point for new immigration. Transformed through the everyday interactions of its diverse residents as well as by political events occurring at the regional, national, and international levels, the neighborhood's historical and contemporary communities reflect the challenges and potential of living in a pluralistic society.

Central Americans in Los Angeles

Author: Rosamaria Segura

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1439623422

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 9935

The second-largest Latino-immigrant group in Los Angeles after Mexicans, Central Americans have become a remarkable presence in city neighborhoods, with colorful festivals, flags adorning cars, community organizations, as well as vibrant ethnic businesses. The people from Belize, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama living in Los Angeles share many cultural and historical commonalities, such as language, politics, religion, and perilous migratory paths as well as future challenges. The distinctions are also evident as ethnicities, music, and food create a healthy diversity throughout residential locations in Los Angeles. During the 1980s and 1990s, an unprecedented number of new Central Americans arrived in this cosmopolitan city, many for economic reasons while others were escaping political turmoil in their native countries. Today they are part of the ethnic layers that shape the local population. Central Americans have embraced Los Angeles as home and, in doing so, transported their rich heritage and customs to the streets of this multicultural metropolis.

Latinos in Pasadena

Author: Roberta H. Martínez

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738569550

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 2874

Histories of Pasadena are rich in details about important citizens, time-honored traditions, and storied enclaves such as Millionaires Row and Lamanda Park. But the legacies of Mexican Americans and other Latino men and women who often worked for Pasadena's rich and famous have been sparsely preserved through the generations--even though these citizens often made remarkable community contributions and lived in close proximity to their employers. A fuller story of the Pasadena area can be provided from these vintage images and the accompanying information culled from anecdotes, master's theses, newspaper articles, formal and informal oral histories, and the Ethnic History Research Project compiled for the City of Pasadena in 1995. Among the stories told is that of Antonio F. Coronel, a one-time Mexican Army officer who served as California state treasurer from 1866 to 1870 and whose image graced the 1904 Tournament of Roses program.

Mexican Americans in Torrance

Author: Alicia Duarte Solis

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1467127736

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 1347

La Rana ("The Frog") is two street blocks located between Crenshaw Boulevard and Van Ness Avenue in Torrance, California. La Rana has a colorful history of immigrants who settled in 1908 from various parts of Mexico with the following surnames: Torres, Ordaz, Grajeda, Flores, Alvarez, Duarte, and Solis. These families fled the Mexican Revolution and religious persecution in search of a brighter future for their children. They attended Torrance schools, such as Torrance Elementary, Nativity Catholic School, Torrance High School, and El Camino College. They earned degrees of higher education from a variety of schools like the University of California, Santa Barbara; California State University Long Beach; Loyola Marymount; the University of Arizona; and American InterContinental University. Today, those progenies include Devin Molina, an anthropologist; James Yanes, a medical doctor specializing in infectious diseases; Eddie Solis, an anesthesiologist; and Maria Dolores White, a nurse practitioner. Other professions include lawyers, nurses, teachers, police officers, accountants, professional baseball players, and a fire chief, as well as many business owners. Their stories are told through vintage photographs gathered from personal collections and commentary from friends and neighbors of the lives they led and the dreams they shared.

Latino Boxing in Southern California

Author: Gene Aguilera

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 146712883X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 96

View: 9466

Southern California, with its burgeoning Latino population, marked the spot as the proving ground for world-class boxers from Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Panama, Nicaragua, and El Salvador to showcase their talent with exciting and unforgettable bouts. Latino Boxing in Southern California tells the true, heartfelt stories of Latino and Mexican ring idols who did battle on the West Coast, while exploring the mythical devotion boxing purists and fans have for their boxers. This colorful tribute to the sweet science, Los Angeles-style, keeps the memory alive of when boxing in this town revolved around the beloved Olympic Auditorium, Main St. Gym, and the Forum.

Los Angeles's Olvera Street

Author: William D. Estrada

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738531052

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 3432

Olvera Street Mexican marketplace and its plaza form the home of Latino culture in the Los Angeles region. Still standing in this downtown location of many fiestas, including Cinco de Mayo, are the Avila Adobe, plaza church-- La Iglesia de Nuestra Se±ora La Reina de Los Angeles, Pico House, Sepulveda House, and L.A. Firehouse No. 1. El Pueblo de La Reina de Los Angeles was founded in 1781. The 1820sbuilt plaza was ruled for decades by the magnanimous Judge Agust­n Olvera. Wine Street was renamed in his honor after his 1876 death and took on a back-alley toughness depicted in early Hollywood films. In the 1920s, Christine Sterling campaigned to save the Avila Adobe from demolition and transform Olvera Street into an internationally recognized tourist destination, which opened in 1930. Today the old plaza and Olvera Street shops, restaurants, museums, and vendors draw 1 million people annually under the auspices of El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument.

Mexican American Baseball in the San Fernando Valley

Author: Richard A. Santillan, Victoria C. Norton, Christopher Docter, Monica Ortez, Richard Arroyo

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 146713452X

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 6511

Mexican American Baseball in the San Fernando Valley explores the teams and players that dotted the valley landscape throughout the 20th century. In a time and place where Mexican Americans were closed off from many city recreation centers, neighborhoods formed their own teams. Baseball and softball reinforced community and regional ties, strengthened family bonds, instilled discipline and dedication that translated into future professional careers, provided women opportunities outside their traditional roles in the home, and fostered lifelong friendships. These photographs serve as a lens to both local sports history and Mexican American history.

Mexican American Baseball in the San Gabriel Valley

Author: Richard A. Santillán, Camila Alva López, James H. Aguirre, Donna Galván, Mark R. Garcia, Foreword by the Hank Aguirre Family

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1467129704

Category:

Page: 128

View: 1450

Mexican American Baseball in the San Gabriel Valley puts on record the resounding and brilliant history of baseball and softball in this vibrant and colorful region. Since the early 1900s, baseball and softball have brought boundless joy and immense honor to their fans, families, and neighborhoods. The rich memories of baseball and softball serve as critical prisms to better understand community history; the struggle for social, educational, and cultural equality; the untold contributions of women; the critical role of immigration and labor movements; economic autonomy; political self-determination; and an unmatched love for sports. These breathtaking images and extraordinary stories shed unparalleled light on baseball and softball in this celebrated area of California.

Early Pomona

Author: Mickey Gallivan

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738547763

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 5351

The first settlers to carve the Pomona Valley out of the California wilderness were Ricardo Vejar and Ygnacio Palomares, who received land grants in 1837 for fighting for Mexico's independence. Nearly three decades after California was ceded to the United States, Southerners escaping the aftermath of the Civil War migrated to the area, and the city was incorporated in 1888. Pomona's landscape evolved from vast Mexican ranchos into prosperous vineyards and orchards, and later into one of Los Angeles's major suburbs. Pomona today is home to the world's largest county fair, the Los Angeles County Fair, as well as to California Polytechnic University and Western University of Health Sciences. The city boasts a thriving art colony, three historic districts, and a unique mix of architecture, including Victorian, Craftsman, transitional, and Spanish-style homes. The more than 150,000 Pomona residents pride themselves on a neighborly small-town flavor that belies the city's large population.

Early Glendale

Author: Juliet M. Arroyo

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738529905

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 2620

The ridges and ranchlands that once covered the expanse between Burbank and Pasadena became the 16th city in Los Angeles County to incorporate. This 1906 act formalized the Township of Glendale, which had grown from the Rancho San Rafael of the Verdugo family through the Spanish, Mexican, and American colonial eras. In the 20th century, some of the oldest film studios called Glendale home. Seven movie theaters operated in the city in the 1920s and so did the first airport offering cross-country flight, Grand Central. In this book, nearly 200 vintage photographs provide a window to the city's bygone days, focusing on the era up to the Second World War, when Glendale's pleasant neighborhoods were evolving together to form one of the county's most populous and ethnically diverse cities.--From publisher description.

Ridgway

Author: Dennis McGeehan

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1439637091

Category: Photography

Page: 128

View: 8952

Ridgway, known as the “lily of the valley,” is located on the scenic Clarion River in Pennsylvania’s Allegheny Mountains. Ridgway’s history has long been closely linked to the river, from a time when residents utilized the water to float timber from the nearby forested hills and supplied lumber for operations around the nation. Much of the beautiful hardwood craftsmanship is preserved today and on display in the elegant Victorian mansions of Ridgway’s former lumber barons. The county seat of Elk County, Ridgway has never let the decline of the lumber industry affect its vitality, and today it is a peaceful, artistic community that draws tourists with its idyllic location. Through historic photographs, Ridgway chronicles the history of this progressive community that remains committed to preserving its past, as well as its future.