Mathematical Models in Population Biology and Epidemiology

Author: Fred Brauer,Dawn Bies

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1475735162

Category: Science

Page: 417

View: 9827

The goal of this book is to search for a balance between simple and analyzable models and unsolvable models which are capable of addressing important questions on population biology. Part I focusses on single species simple models including those which have been used to predict the growth of human and animal population in the past. Single population models are, in some sense, the building blocks of more realistic models -- the subject of Part II. Their role is fundamental to the study of ecological and demographic processes including the role of population structure and spatial heterogeneity -- the subject of Part III. This book, which will include both examples and exercises, is of use to practitioners, graduate students, and scientists working in the field.

Mathematical Models in Population Biology and Epidemiology

Author: Fred Brauer,Carlos Castillo-Chavez

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1461416868

Category: Mathematics

Page: 508

View: 1032

The goal of this book is to search for a balance between simple and analyzable models and unsolvable models which are capable of addressing important questions on population biology. Part I focusses on single species simple models including those which have been used to predict the growth of human and animal population in the past. Single population models are, in some sense, the building blocks of more realistic models -- the subject of Part II. Their role is fundamental to the study of ecological and demographic processes including the role of population structure and spatial heterogeneity -- the subject of Part III. This book, which will include both examples and exercises, is of use to practitioners, graduate students, and scientists working in the field.

Mathematical Models in Population Biology and Epidemiology

Author: Fred Brauer,Carlos Castillo-Chavez

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9780387989020

Category: Science

Page: 417

View: 6262

The goal of this book is to search for a balance between simple and analyzable models and unsolvable models which are capable of addressing important questions on population biology. Part I focusses on single species simple models including those which have been used to predict the growth of human and animal population in the past. Single population models are, in some sense, the building blocks of more realistic models -- the subject of Part II. Their role is fundamental to the study of ecological and demographic processes including the role of population structure and spatial heterogeneity -- the subject of Part III. This book, which will include both examples and exercises, is of use to practitioners, graduate students, and scientists working in the field.

Structured Population Models in Biology and Epidemiology

Author: Pierre Magal,Shigui Ruan

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3540782737

Category: Mathematics

Page: 302

View: 862

In this new century mankind faces ever more challenging environmental and publichealthproblems,suchaspollution,invasionbyexoticspecies,theem- gence of new diseases or the emergence of diseases into new regions (West Nile virus,SARS,Anthrax,etc.),andtheresurgenceofexistingdiseases(in?uenza, malaria, TB, HIV/AIDS, etc.). Mathematical models have been successfully used to study many biological, epidemiological and medical problems, and nonlinear and complex dynamics have been observed in all of those contexts. Mathematical studies have helped us not only to better understand these problems but also to ?nd solutions in some cases, such as the prediction and control of SARS outbreaks, understanding HIV infection, and the investi- tion of antibiotic-resistant infections in hospitals. Structuredpopulationmodelsdistinguishindividualsfromoneanother- cording to characteristics such as age, size, location, status, and movement, to determine the birth, growth and death rates, interaction with each other and with environment, infectivity, etc. The goal of structured population models is to understand how these characteristics a?ect the dynamics of these models and thus the outcomes and consequences of the biological and epidemiolo- cal processes. There is a very large and growing body of literature on these topics. This book deals with the recent and important advances in the study of structured population models in biology and epidemiology. There are six chapters in this book, written by leading researchers in these areas.

Mathematical Epidemiology

Author: Fred Brauer,Pauline van den Driessche,J. Wu

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 3540789103

Category: Medical

Page: 414

View: 6354

Based on lecture notes of two summer schools with a mixed audience from mathematical sciences, epidemiology and public health, this volume offers a comprehensive introduction to basic ideas and techniques in modeling infectious diseases, for the comparison of strategies to plan for an anticipated epidemic or pandemic, and to deal with a disease outbreak in real time. It covers detailed case studies for diseases including pandemic influenza, West Nile virus, and childhood diseases. Models for other diseases including Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, fox rabies, and sexually transmitted infections are included as applications. Its chapters are coherent and complementary independent units. In order to accustom students to look at the current literature and to experience different perspectives, no attempt has been made to achieve united writing style or unified notation. Notes on some mathematical background (calculus, matrix algebra, differential equations, and probability) have been prepared and may be downloaded at the web site of the Centre for Disease Modeling (www.cdm.yorku.ca).

Differential Equations Models in Biology, Epidemiology and Ecology

Proceedings of a Conference held in Claremont California, January 13–16, 1990

Author: Stavros Busenberg,Mario Martelli

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 3642456928

Category: Mathematics

Page: 267

View: 446

The past forty years have been the stage for the maturation of mathematical biolo~ as a scientific field. The foundations laid by the pioneers of the field during the first half of this century have been combined with advances in ap plied mathematics and the computational sciences to create a vibrant area of scientific research with established research journals, professional societies, deep subspecialty areas, and graduate education programs. Mathematical biology is by its very nature cross-disciplinary, and research papers appear in mathemat ics, biology and other scientific journals, as well as in the specialty journals devoted to mathematical and theoretical biology. Multiple author papers are common, and so are collaborations between individuals who have academic bases in different traditional departments. Those who seek to keep abreast of current trends and problems need to interact with research workers from a much broader spectrum of fields than is common in the traditional mono-culture disciplines. Consequently, it is beneficial to have occasions which bring together significant numbers of workers in this field in a forum that encourages the exchange of ideas and which leads to a timely publication of the work that is presented. Such an occasion occurred during January 13 to 16, 1990 when almost two hun dred research workers participated in an international conference on Differential Equations and Applications to Biology and Population Dynamics which was held in Claremont.

Modeling Infectious Diseases in Humans and Animals

Author: Matt J. Keeling,Pejman Rohani

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400841038

Category: Science

Page: 408

View: 3357

For epidemiologists, evolutionary biologists, and health-care professionals, real-time and predictive modeling of infectious disease is of growing importance. This book provides a timely and comprehensive introduction to the modeling of infectious diseases in humans and animals, focusing on recent developments as well as more traditional approaches. Matt Keeling and Pejman Rohani move from modeling with simple differential equations to more recent, complex models, where spatial structure, seasonal "forcing," or stochasticity influence the dynamics, and where computer simulation needs to be used to generate theory. In each of the eight chapters, they deal with a specific modeling approach or set of techniques designed to capture a particular biological factor. They illustrate the methodology used with examples from recent research literature on human and infectious disease modeling, showing how such techniques can be used in practice. Diseases considered include BSE, foot-and-mouth, HIV, measles, rubella, smallpox, and West Nile virus, among others. Particular attention is given throughout the book to the development of practical models, useful both as predictive tools and as a means to understand fundamental epidemiological processes. To emphasize this approach, the last chapter is dedicated to modeling and understanding the control of diseases through vaccination, quarantine, or culling. Comprehensive, practical introduction to infectious disease modeling Builds from simple to complex predictive models Models and methodology fully supported by examples drawn from research literature Practical models aid students' understanding of fundamental epidemiological processes For many of the models presented, the authors provide accompanying programs written in Java, C, Fortran, and MATLAB In-depth treatment of role of modeling in understanding disease control

Dynamical Models in Biology

Author: Miklós Farkas

Publisher: Academic Press

ISBN: 9780080530604

Category: Mathematics

Page: 187

View: 6906

Dynamic Models in Biology offers an introduction to modern mathematical biology. This book provides a short introduction to modern mathematical methods in modeling dynamical phenomena and treats the broad topics of population dynamics, epidemiology, evolution, immunology, morphogenesis, and pattern formation. Primarily employing differential equations, the author presents accessible descriptions of difficult mathematical models. Recent mathematical results are included, but the author's presentation gives intuitive meaning to all the main formulae. Besides mathematicians who want to get acquainted with this relatively new field of applications, this book is useful for physicians, biologists, agricultural engineers, and environmentalists. Key Topics Include: Chaotic dynamics of populations The spread of sexually transmitted diseases Problems of the origin of life Models of immunology Formation of animal hide patterns The intuitive meaning of mathematical formulae explained with many figures Applying new mathematical results in modeling biological phenomena Miklos Farkas is a professor at Budapest University of Technology where he has researched and instructed mathematics for over thirty years. He has taught at universities in the former Soviet Union, Canada, Australia, Venezuela, Nigeria, India, and Columbia. Prof. Farkas received the 1999 Bolyai Award of the Hungarian Academy of Science and the 2001 Albert Szentgyorgyi Award of the Hungarian Ministry of Education. A 'down-to-earth' introduction to the growing field of modern mathematical biology Also includes appendices which provide background material that goes beyond advanced calculus and linear algebra

Mathematical Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases

Model Building, Analysis and Interpretation

Author: O. Diekmann,J. A. P. Heesterbeek

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780471492412

Category: Mathematics

Page: 303

View: 4287

Mathematical Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases Model Building, Analysis and Interpretation O. Diekmann University of Utrecht, The Netherlands J. A. P. Heesterbeek Centre for Biometry Wageningen, The Netherlands The mathematical modelling of epidemics in populations is a vast and important area of study. It is about translating biological assumptions into mathematics, about mathematical analysis aided by interpretation and about obtaining insight into epidemic phenomena when translating mathematical results back into population biology. Model assumptions are formulated in terms of, usually stochastic, behaviour of individuals and then the resulting phenomena, at the population level, are unravelled. Conceptual clarity is attained, assumptions are stated clearly, hidden working hypotheses are attained and mechanistic links between different observables are exposed. Features: * Model construction, analysis and interpretation receive detailed attention * Uniquely covers both deterministic and stochastic viewpoints * Examples of applications given throughout * Extensive coverage of the latest research into the mathematical modelling of epidemics of infectious diseases * Provides a solid foundation of modelling skills The reader will learn to translate, model, analyse and interpret, with the help of the numerous exercises. In literally working through this text, the reader acquires modelling skills that are also valuable outside of epidemiology, certainly within population dynamics, but even beyond that. In addition, the reader receives training in mathematical argumentation. The text is aimed at applied mathematicians with an interest in population biology and epidemiology, at theoretical biologists and epidemiologists. Previous exposure to epidemic concepts is not required, as all background information is given. The book is primarily aimed at self-study and ideally suited for small discussion groups, or for use as a course text.

An Introduction to Mathematical Epidemiology

Author: Maia Martcheva

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1489976124

Category: Mathematics

Page: 453

View: 9990

The book is a comprehensive, self-contained introduction to the mathematical modeling and analysis of infectious diseases. It includes model building, fitting to data, local and global analysis techniques. Various types of deterministic dynamical models are considered: ordinary differential equation models, delay-differential equation models, difference equation models, age-structured PDE models and diffusion models. It includes various techniques for the computation of the basic reproduction number as well as approaches to the epidemiological interpretation of the reproduction number. MATLAB code is included to facilitate the data fitting and the simulation with age-structured models.

Infectious Diseases of Humans

Dynamics and Control

Author: Roy M. Anderson,Robert M. May

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198540403

Category: Medical

Page: 757

View: 1502

This much-acclaimed book provides an analytic framework for evaluating public health measures aimed at eradicating or controlling communicable diseases.

Mathematical Modeling of Biological Systems, Volume II

Epidemiology, Evolution and Ecology, Immunology, Neural Systems and the Brain, and Innovative Mathematical Methods

Author: Andreas Deutsch,Rafael Bravo de la Parra,Rob J. de Boer,Odo Diekmann,Peter Jagers,Eva Kisdi,Mirjam Kretzschmar,Petr Lansky,Hans Metz

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 081764556X

Category: Mathematics

Page: 386

View: 1184

Volume II of this two-volume, interdisciplinary work is a unified presentation of a broad range of state-of-the-art topics in the rapidly growing field of mathematical modeling in the biological sciences. Highlighted throughout are mathematical and computational apporaches to examine central problems in the life sciences, ranging from the organization principles of individual cells to the dynamics of large populations. The chapters are thematically organized into the following main areas: epidemiology, evolution and ecology, immunology, neural systems and the brain, and innovative mathematical methods and education. The work will be an excellent reference text for a broad audience of researchers, practitioners, and advanced students in this rapidly growing field at the intersection of applied mathematics, experimental biology and medicine, computational biology, biochemistry, computer science, and physics.

Mathematical Tools for Understanding Infectious Disease Dynamics

Author: Odo Diekmann,Hans Heesterbeek,Tom Britton

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691155399

Category: Mathematics

Page: 502

View: 5010

Mathematical modeling is critical to our understanding of how infectious diseases spread at the individual and population levels. This book gives readers the necessary skills to correctly formulate and analyze mathematical models in infectious disease epidemiology, and is the first treatment of the subject to integrate deterministic and stochastic models and methods. Mathematical Tools for Understanding Infectious Disease Dynamics fully explains how to translate biological assumptions into mathematics to construct useful and consistent models, and how to use the biological interpretation and mathematical reasoning to analyze these models. It shows how to relate models to data through statistical inference, and how to gain important insights into infectious disease dynamics by translating mathematical results back to biology. This comprehensive and accessible book also features numerous detailed exercises throughout; full elaborations to all exercises are provided. Covers the latest research in mathematical modeling of infectious disease epidemiology Integrates deterministic and stochastic approaches Teaches skills in model construction, analysis, inference, and interpretation Features numerous exercises and their detailed elaborations Motivated by real-world applications throughout

Dynamical Systems in Population Biology

Author: Xiao-Qiang Zhao

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319564331

Category: Mathematics

Page: 406

View: 4624

This research monograph provides an introduction to the theory of nonautonomous semiflows with applications to population dynamics. It develops dynamical system approaches to various evolutionary equations such as difference, ordinary, functional, and partial differential equations, and pays more attention to periodic and almost periodic phenomena. The presentation includes persistence theory, monotone dynamics, periodic and almost periodic semiflows, basic reproduction ratios, traveling waves, and global analysis of prototypical population models in ecology and epidemiology. Research mathematicians working with nonlinear dynamics, particularly those interested in applications to biology, will find this book useful. It may also be used as a textbook or as supplementary reading for a graduate special topics course on the theory and applications of dynamical systems. Dr. Xiao-Qiang Zhao is a University Research Professor at Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada. His main research interests involve applied dynamical systems, nonlinear differential equations, and mathematical biology. He is the author of more than 100 papers, and his research has played an important role in the development of the theory and applications of monotone dynamical systems, periodic and almost periodic semiflows, uniform persistence, and basic reproduction ratios.

A Short History of Mathematical Population Dynamics

Author: Nicolas Bacaër

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9780857291158

Category: Mathematics

Page: 160

View: 2007

As Eugene Wigner stressed, mathematics has proven unreasonably effective in the physical sciences and their technological applications. The role of mathematics in the biological, medical and social sciences has been much more modest but has recently grown thanks to the simulation capacity offered by modern computers. This book traces the history of population dynamics---a theoretical subject closely connected to genetics, ecology, epidemiology and demography---where mathematics has brought significant insights. It presents an overview of the genesis of several important themes: exponential growth, from Euler and Malthus to the Chinese one-child policy; the development of stochastic models, from Mendel's laws and the question of extinction of family names to percolation theory for the spread of epidemics, and chaotic populations, where determinism and randomness intertwine. The reader of this book will see, from a different perspective, the problems that scientists face when governments ask for reliable predictions to help control epidemics (AIDS, SARS, swine flu), manage renewable resources (fishing quotas, spread of genetically modified organisms) or anticipate demographic evolutions such as aging.

Methods and Models in Mathematical Biology

Deterministic and Stochastic Approaches

Author: Johannes Müller,Christina Kuttler

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3642272517

Category: Mathematics

Page: 711

View: 5702

This book developed from classes in mathematical biology taught by the authors over several years at the Technische Universität München. The main themes are modeling principles, mathematical principles for the analysis of these models and model-based analysis of data. The key topics of modern biomathematics are covered: ecology, epidemiology, biochemistry, regulatory networks, neuronal networks and population genetics. A variety of mathematical methods are introduced, ranging from ordinary and partial differential equations to stochastic graph theory and branching processes. A special emphasis is placed on the interplay between stochastic and deterministic models.

Mathematical Population Dynamics and Epidemiology in Temporal and Spatio-Temporal Domains

Author: Harkaran Singh,Joydip Dhar

Publisher: Apple Academic Press

ISBN: 9781771886710

Category:

Page: 350

View: 1297

In today's era, the spread of diseases happens very quickly as a large population migrates from one part to another of the world with the readily available transportation facilities. In this century, mankind faces even more challenging environment- and health-related problems than ever before. Therefore, the studies on the spread of the communicable diseases are very important. This book, Mathematical Population Dynamics and Epidemiology in Temporal and Spatio-Temporal Domains, provides a useful experimental tool in making practical predictions, building and testing theories, answering specific questions, determining sensitivities of the parameters, devising control strategies, and much more. This new volume, Mathematical Population Dynamics and Epidemiology in Temporal and Spatio-Temporal Domains, focuses on the study of population dynamics with special emphasis on the migration of populations in a heterogeneous patchy habitat, the human and animal population, and the spreading of epidemics, an important area of research in mathematical biology dealing with the survival of different species. The volume also provides the background needed to interpret, construct, and analyze a wide variety of mathematical models. Most of the techniques presented in the book can be readily applied to model other phenomena, in biology as well as in other disciplines. The studies presented here on the prey-predator models can be helpful for conservation strategies in forestry habitats, and the epidemic model studies can helpful to the public health policymakers in determining how to control the rapid outbreak of infectious diseases. In this book, the authors have proposed eleven different models in order to facilitate understanding: Two models with different prey-predator interactions Four population models with diffusion in two-patch environment One prey-predator model with disease in the prey Four epidemic models with different control strategies. This book will be of interest to interdisciplinary researchers and policymakers, especially mathematical biologists, biologists, physicists, and epidemiologists. The book can be useful as textbook or reference book for graduate and postgraduate advanced level mathematical biology courses.

Mathematical Biology II

Spatial Models and Biomedical Applications

Author: James D. Murray

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0387952284

Category: Mathematics

Page: 814

View: 7314

This richly illustrated third edition provides a thorough training in practical mathematical biology and shows how exciting mathematical challenges can arise from a genuinely interdisciplinary involvement with the biosciences. It has been extensively updated and extended to cover much of the growth of mathematical biology. From the reviews: ""This book, a classical text in mathematical biology, cleverly combines mathematical tools with subject area sciences."--SHORT BOOK REVIEWS