Many Minds, One Heart

SNCC's Dream for a New America

Author: Wesley C. Hogan

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807867896

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 3968

How did the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee break open the caste system in the American South between 1960 and 1965? In this innovative study, Wesley Hogan explores what SNCC accomplished and, more important, how it fostered significant social change in such a short time. She offers new insights into the internal dynamics of SNCC as well as the workings of the larger civil rights and Black Power movement of which it was a part. As Hogan chronicles, the members of SNCC created some of the civil rights movement's boldest experiments in freedom, including the sit-ins of 1960, the rejuvenated Freedom Rides of 1961, and grassroots democracy projects in Georgia and Mississippi. She highlights several key players--including Charles Sherrod, Bob Moses, and Fannie Lou Hamer--as innovators of grassroots activism and democratic practice. Breaking new ground, Hogan shows how SNCC laid the foundation for the emergence of the New Left and created new definitions of political leadership during the civil rights and Vietnam eras. She traces the ways other social movements--such as Black Power, women's liberation, and the antiwar movement--adapted practices developed within SNCC to apply to their particular causes. Many Minds, One Heart ultimately reframes the movement and asks us to look anew at where America stands on justice and equality today.

Transnational Roots of the Civil Rights Movement

African American Explorations of the Gandhian Repertoire

Author: Sean Chabot

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739145797

Category: Social Science

Page: 220

View: 7396

This book explores collective learning in the Gandhian repertoire’s transnational diffusion from the Indian independence movement to the American civil rights movement. Instead of focusing primarily on interpersonal linkages or causal mechanisms, it highlights how decades of translation and experimentation by various actors enabled full implementation. It also shows that transnational diffusion was not a linear and predictable process, but underwent numerous twists and turns. It is relevant for contemporary scholars as well as activists.

Ella Baker

Community Organizer of the Civil Rights Movement

Author: J. Todd Moye

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442215674

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 204

View: 5175

Ella Josephine Baker was among the most influential strategists of the most important social movement in modern US history, the civil rights movement. In this book, historian J. Todd Moye masterfully reconstructs Baker’s life and contribution for a new generation of readers.

For a Voice and the Vote

My Journey with the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party

Author: Lisa Anderson Todd

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813147166

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 468

View: 5000

During the summer of 1964, more than a thousand individuals descended on Mississippi to help the state's African American citizens register to vote. Student organizers, volunteers, and community members canvassed black neighborhoods to organize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP), a group that sought to give a voice to black Mississippians and demonstrate their will to vote in the face of terror and intimidation. In For a Voice and the Vote, author Lisa Anderson Todd gives a fascinating insider's account of her experience volunteering in Greenville, Mississippi, during Freedom Summer, when she participated in assembling the MFDP. Innovative and integrated, the party worked to provide education, candidates, and local and statewide organization for blacks who were denied the vote. For Todd, it was an exciting, dangerous, and life-changing experience. The summer culminated with the 1964 Atlantic City Democratic Convention, where the MFDP fought boldly for the opportunity to be included as the voting Mississippi delegation but, when they ultimately refused the Democrats' unacceptable terms, were criticized as politically naïve, militant protestors. This firsthand account attempts to set the record straight about the MFDP's challenge to the convention and to shed light on the efforts of this dedicated, loyal, and courageous delegation. Offering the first full account of the group's five days in Atlantic City, For a Voice and the Vote draws on oral histories, the author's personal interviews of individuals who supported the MFDP in 1964, and other primary sources.

Imprisoned in a Luminous Glare

Photography and the African American Freedom Struggle

Author: Leigh Raiford

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 080788233X

Category: Social Science

Page: 312

View: 8104

In Imprisoned in a Luminous Glare, Leigh Raiford argues that over the past one hundred years, activists in the black freedom struggle have used photographic imagery both to gain political recognition and to develop a different visual vocabulary about black lives. Offering readings of the use of photography in the anti-lynching movement, the civil rights movement, and the black power movement, Imprisoned in a Luminous Glare focuses on key transformations in technology, society, and politics to understand the evolution of photography's deployment in capturing white oppression, black resistance, and African American life.

Power to the Poor

Black-Brown Coalition and the Fight for Economic Justice, 1960-1974

Author: Gordon K. Mantler

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469608065

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 8930

The Poor People's Campaign of 1968 has long been overshadowed by the assassination of its architect, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and the political turmoil of that year. In a major reinterpretation of civil rights and Chicano movement history, Gordon K. Mantler demonstrates how King's unfinished crusade became the era's most high-profile attempt at multiracial collaboration and sheds light on the interdependent relationship between racial identity and political coalition among African Americans and Mexican Americans. Mantler argues that while the fight against poverty held great potential for black-brown cooperation, such efforts also exposed the complex dynamics between the nation's two largest minority groups. Drawing on oral histories, archives, periodicals, and FBI surveillance files, Mantler paints a rich portrait of the campaign and the larger antipoverty work from which it emerged, including the labor activism of Cesar Chavez, opposition of Black and Chicano Power to state violence in Chicago and Denver, and advocacy for Mexican American land-grant rights in New Mexico. Ultimately, Mantler challenges readers to rethink the multiracial history of the long civil rights movement and the difficulty of sustaining political coalitions.

The Music Has Gone Out of the Movement

Civil Rights and the Johnson Administration, 1965-1968

Author: David C. Carter

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469606577

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 2118

After the passage of sweeping civil rights and voting rights legislation in 1964 and 1965, the civil rights movement stood poised to build on considerable momentum. In a famous speech at Howard University in 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson declared that victory in the next battle for civil rights would be measured in "equal results" rather than equal rights and opportunities. It seemed that for a brief moment the White House and champions of racial equality shared the same objectives and priorities. Finding common ground proved elusive, however, in a climate of growing social and political unrest marked by urban riots, the Vietnam War, and resurgent conservatism. Examining grassroots movements and organizations and their complicated relationships with the federal government and state authorities between 1965 and 1968, David C. Carter takes readers through the inner workings of local civil rights coalitions as they tried to maintain strength within their organizations while facing both overt and subtle opposition from state and federal officials. He also highlights internal debates and divisions within the White House and the executive branch, demonstrating that the federal government's relationship to the movement and its major goals was never as clear-cut as the president's progressive rhetoric suggested. Carter reveals the complex and often tense relationships between the Johnson administration and activist groups advocating further social change, and he extends the traditional timeline of the civil rights movement beyond the passage of the Voting Rights Act.

Freedom Facts and Firsts

400 Years of the African American Civil Rights Experience

Author: Jessie Carney Smith,Linda T Wynn

Publisher: Visible Ink Press

ISBN: 1578592607

Category: Social Science

Page: 408

View: 5985

Spanning nearly 400 years from the early abolitionists to the present, this guide book profiles more than 400 people, places, and events that have shaped the history of the black struggle for freedom. Coverage includes information on such mainstay figures as Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, and Rosa Parks, but also delves into how lesser known figures contributed to and shaped the history of civil rights. Learn how the Housewives' League of Detroit started a nationwide movement to support black businesses, helping many to survive the depression; or discover what effect sports journalist Samuel Harold Lacy had on Jackie Robinson's historic entrance into the major leagues. This comprehensive resource chronicles the breadth and passion of an entire people's quest for freedom.

Dispossession

Discrimination against African American Farmers in the Age of Civil Rights

Author: Pete Daniel

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469602024

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 3429

Between 1940 and 1974, the number of African American farmers fell from 681,790 to just 45,594--a drop of 93 percent. In his hard-hitting book, historian Pete Daniel analyzes this decline and chronicles black farmers' fierce struggles to remain on the land in the face of discrimination by bureaucrats in the U.S. Department of Agriculture. He exposes the shameful fact that at the very moment civil rights laws promised to end discrimination, hundreds of thousands of black farmers lost their hold on the land as they were denied loans, information, and access to the programs essential to survival in a capital-intensive farm structure. More than a matter of neglect of these farmers and their rights, this "passive nullification" consisted of a blizzard of bureaucratic obfuscation, blatant acts of discrimination and cronyism, violence, and intimidation. Dispossession recovers a lost chapter of the black experience in the American South, presenting a counternarrative to the conventional story of the progress achieved by the civil rights movement.

The Nation

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 2416


Milestone Documents in African American History

Author: Paul Finkelman

Publisher: Schlager Group Inc

ISBN: 9781935306054

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 2100

View: 4007

The fourth publication in the award-winning, critically acclaimed Milestone Documents sereis, Milestone Documents in African American History explores the fundamental primary sources in African American history. This four-volume set covers 135 iconic primary documents from the 1600's to the present. Each entry offers the full text of the document in question as well as an in-depth, analytical essay that places the document in its historical context.

My Song

Die Autobiographie

Author: Harry Belafonte,Michael Shnayerson

Publisher: Kiepenheuer & Witsch

ISBN: 3462305344

Category: Music

Page: 656

View: 7901

Eine mitreißende Jahrhundertgeschichte: Harry Belafontes Autobiographie Sänger, Schauspieler, politischer Aktivist. Harry Belafontes Leben mutet an wie ein Märchen und liest sich wie ein Roman: Aus ärmlichen Verhältnissen stammend, wurde er zu einem der bekanntesten und beliebtesten Entertainer unserer Zeit. Ein Mann, der die Macht, die ihm seine Popularität verleiht, seit Jahrzehnten nutzt, um für eine gerechtere Gesellschaft zu kämpfen. Er kannte sie alle: Eleanor Roosevelt, Sidney Poitier, John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Jr., Robert Kennedy, Nelson Mandela, Fidel Castro. Die Lebensgeschichte Harry Belafontes ist eine Jahrhundertstory. Auf wunderbar lebendige Weise erzählt er von seiner Kindheit im Harlem der 1930er-Jahre, wo Ganoven den Ton angaben, von Kindheitstagen zwischen jamaikanischen Bananenplan tagen, von seinen Kollegen in der Schauspielklasse des deutschen Exilanten Erwin Piscator – Marlon Brando, Walter Matthau und Tony Curtis – damals allesamt noch so unbekannt wie Belafonte, von den Anfängen der Bürgerrechtsbewegung, seiner Freundschaft mit Martin Luther King, Jr., und wie es dazu kam, dass er 1960 Wahlkampfwerbung für John F. Kennedy machte. Bis heute hat Harry Belafonte, seit Jahren UNICEF-Botschafter, nichts von seiner Leidenschaft für den politischen Kampf eingebüßt: Er wirft Barack Obama vor, nicht genug Herz für die Armen zu zeigen, und sucht, gerade auch mit diesem Buch, den Dialog mit politisch aktiven jungen Menschen auf der ganzen Welt. Eine inspirierende Autobiographie, ein Buch, das vor Energie und Lebensfreude vibriert wie die Songs Harry Belafontes.

Neunzehnhundertachtundsechzig

Author: Mark Kurlansky

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783453600393

Category: History, Modern

Page: 460

View: 2876

Tet-Offensive in Vietnam, Antikriegsbewegung, Prager Frühling, Rassenunruhen in Amerika und Notstandsgesetze in Deutschland, Pariser Mai und Demonstrationen polnischer und italienischer, mexikanischer und japanischer Studenten. Abbie Hoffman in New York,