Making Sense of Media and Politics

Five Principles in Political Communication

Author: Gadi Wolfsfeld

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1136887687

Category: Political Science

Page: 160

View: 4161

Politics is above all a contest, and the news media is the central arena for viewing that competition. In Making Sense of Media and Politics, Gadi Wolfsfeld introduces readers to the most important concepts that serve as a framework for examining the interrelationship of media and politics.

Making Sense of Media and Politics

Five Principles in Political Communication

Author: Gadi Wolfsfeld

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136887679

Category: Political Science

Page: 160

View: 8872

Politics is above all a contest, and the news media are the central arena for viewing that competition. One of the central concerns of political communication has to do with the myriad ways in which politics has an impact on the news media and the equally diverse ways in which the media influences politics. Both of these aspects in turn weigh heavily on the effects such political communication has on mass citizens. In Making Sense of Media and Politics, Gadi Wolfsfeld introduces readers to the most important concepts that serve as a framework for examining the interrelationship of media and politics: political power can usually be translated into power over the news media when authorities lose control over the political environment they also lose control over the news there is no such thing as objective journalism (nor can there be) the media are dedicated more than anything else to telling a good story the most important effects of the news media on citizens tend to be unintentional and unnoticed. By identifying these five key principles of political communication, the author examines those who package and send political messages, those who transform political messages into news, and the effect all this has on citizens. The result is a brief, engaging guide to help make sense of the wider world of media and politics and an essential companion to more in-depths studies of the field.

Making Sense of Mediatized Politics

Theoretical and Empirical Perspectives

Author: Jesper Stromback,Frank Esser

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317507037

Category: Social Science

Page: 128

View: 8664

Over time and across Western democracies, the media has become increasingly influential, and a great deal more political processes have become altered, shaped or structured by the media and the perceived need of individuals, organizations and social systems to communicate with or through the media. The key theoretical perspective to understand this process is mediatization. As a long-term process which has increased the importance of the media and their spill-over effects on political processes, institutions, organizations and actors, mediatization is one of the most important processes reshaping politics and transforming democracies across the Western world. While the theoretical perspective of mediatization has become increasingly popular in recent years, scholarly understanding of the mediatization process and its antecedents, consequences and contingencies are still hampered by unresolved questions and a lack of systematic empirical studies. This volume addresses this by bringing together contributions that analyze and investigate different facets of the mediatization of politics, making a significant contribution to our theoretical as well as empirical understanding of the mediatization of politics, and setting the agenda for further research on the mediatization of politics. This book was originally published as a special issue of Journalism Studies.

On Media

Making Sense of Politics

Author: Doris A. Graber

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199945985

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 669

Even as more and more communications avenues open up, are Americans losing their political IQ? Some democratic theorists bemoan citizen apathy, ignorance, and incapacity to make sound political judgments. Renowned media scholar Doris Graber contends that such assessments are based on impractical and outmoded models of measuring citizen awareness and engagement. Using what she calls "reality-based" research methods and a sensitivity to contemporary trends, Graber finds that average people understand many political issues and can think about them in complex ways. She reports her new research on learning from entertainment offerings, emphasizing its novel aspects, including experiments, interviews, message board analyses, and stimulus dramas. The book includes companion studies carried out in the Netherlands and Greece designed to test whether the American findings are culture-specific or hold true across cultural settings. A capstone reflection by a communications authority, On Media offers new approaches to timeworn topics and projects an emerging image of public political knowledge that is at once encouraging, inspirational, and fascinating in its contour and detail.

Political Communication and Social Theory

Author: Aeron Davis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136940286

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 216

View: 1841

Political Communication and Social Theory presents an advanced and challenging text for students and scholars of political communication and mass media in democracies. It draws together work from across political communication, media sociology and political sociology, and includes a mix of theoretical debate and current examples from several democratic media systems. Its wide ranging discussions both introduce and contest the traditional scholarship on a number of contemporary topics and issues. These include: comparative political and media systems theories of democracy, representation and the public sphere political party communication, marketing and elections the production of news media and public policy media sociology and journalist-source relations celebrity politics, popular culture and political leadership new media and online democracy national-global politics and international political communication foreign policy-making, war and media the crisis of public communication in established democracies. At the same time, Political Communication and Social Theory also offers a fascinating investigation of the causes of crisis in established political and media systems. In today’s democracies, trust in politicians, state institutions and mainstream media sources has dropped to new lows. The traditional business model that sustained journalism is failing and nations are struggling to respond to the existing global recession and impending environmental and resource crises. Drawing on interviews with over 100 experienced politicians, journalists and civil servants, Aeron Davis explores how the varied political actors and communicative processes, at the centre of UK democracy, may or may not be contributing to such crisis tendencies.

The Dynamics of Political Communication

Media and Politics in a Digital Age

Author: Richard M. Perloff

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136294597

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 488

View: 7594

"The Dynamics of Political Communication blends the drama, excitement, and chaos of politics with the extensive body of social science research that maps in detail the role of the communication media in our political life." —Maxwell McCombs, University of Texas at Austin "The effortlessness and accessibility with which this text walks the reader through theories, current examples and exercises will also make it a very popular textbook for undergraduate courses. I look forward to assigning it in my classes." —Dietram A. Scheufele, University of Wisconsin-Madison "Written in an easily accessible style and filled with timely and interesting examples, this textbook would be a first-rate addition to any introductory course on the topic." —Gadi Wolfsfeld, Author of Making Sense of Media and Politics: Five Principles in Political Communication "...an engaging and timely analysis of the central role of media in American politics. ... The book provides multiple perspectives to stimulate critical thought and reflection." —Ann N. Crigler, University of Southern California "Perloff has offered a systematic overview of the topic that allows us to make sense of the chaotic communication environment we are enveloped within. ... A must-read for anyone looking to introduce themselves to this important research area." —R. Lance Holbert, The Ohio State University What impact do news and political advertising have on us? How do candidates use media to persuade us as voters? Are we informed adequately about political issues? Do 21st-century political communications measure up to democratic ideals? The Dynamics of Political Communication: Media and Politics in a Digital Age explores these issues and guides us through current political communication theories and beliefs. Author Richard M. Perloff details the fluid landscape of political communication and offers us an engaging introduction to the field and a thorough tour of the discipline. He examines essential concepts in this arena, such as agenda-setting, agenda-building, framing, political socialization, and issues of bias that are part of campaign news. Designed to provide an understanding and appreciation of the principles involved in political communication along with methods of research and hypothesis-testing, each chapter includes materials that challenge us by encouraging reflection on controversial matters and providing links to online examples of real-life political communication. The text’s companion website provides expanded resources for students as well as materials for instructors to use in the classroom. The Dynamics of Political Communication immerses readers in contemporary events through its coverage of online campaigning, effects of negative advertising, issues of gender bias in campaign politics, and image-management strategies in the 2012 campaign. It will prepare you to survey the current political landscape with a more critical eye, and encourage a greater understanding of the challenges and occurrences presented in this constantly evolving field.

Who Speaks for the Climate?

Making Sense of Media Reporting on Climate Change

Author: Maxwell T. Boykoff

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139501798

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 3989

The public rely upon media representations to help interpret and make sense of the many complexities relating to climate science and governance. Media representations of climate issues – from news to entertainment – are powerful and important links between people's everyday realities and experiences, and the ways in which they are discussed by scientists, policymakers and public actors. A dynamic mix of influences – from internal workings of mass media such as journalistic norms, to external political, economic, cultural and social factors – shape what becomes a climate 'story'. Providing a bridge between academic considerations and real world developments, this book helps students, academic researchers and interested members of the public make sense of media reporting on climate change as it explores 'who speaks for climate' and what effects this may have on the spectrum of possible responses to contemporary climate challenges.

Media Power in Politics

Author: Doris A Graber

Publisher: CQ Press

ISBN: 9781604266108

Category: Political Science

Page: 480

View: 7324

Once again, Doris Graber brings readers the most thought-provoking and recent scholarship about the actual power of the media in the real world of politics. With approximately 35 essays, half of them new to this edition, the selections reflect the latest changes in American politics, in American media platforms, and in the interactions between political actors and journalists. Examining these changes and assessing their political significance, this new sixth edition includes coverage of: * the influence of non-professional citizen journalists; * a look ahead at media development in the next decade; * the public's growing disdain for the media and its effect on the media's influence; * old and new media's impact on political participation; * media and the 2008 presidential election; * interest groups' power to control news selection; * media happenings at the state and local levels; * lobbyists' efforts to derail updates to media laws and regulations.

Making Sense of School Choice

Politics, Policies, and Practice under Conditions of Cultural Diversity

Author: Joel A. Windle

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137483539

Category: Education

Page: 189

View: 2044

Making Sense of School Choice explains why school choice fails to deliver on its promise to meet the needs of culturally diverse populations, even in one of the world's most marketized education systems. Windle offers fresh insights into the transnational processes involved in producing educational inequalities.

Making Sense of Nature

Author: Noel Castree

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134613903

Category: Nature

Page: 376

View: 7539

We listen to a cacophony of voices instructing us how to think and feel about nature, including our own bodies. The news media, wildlife documentaries, science magazines, and environmental NGOs are among those clamouring for our attention. But are we empowered by all this knowledge or is our dependence on various communities allowing our thoughts, sentiments and activities to be unduly governed by others? Making Sense of Nature shows that what we call ‘nature’ is made sense of for us in ways that make it central to social order, social change and social dissent. By utilising insights and extended examples from anthropology, cultural studies, human geography, philosophy, politics, sociology, science studies, this interdisciplinary text asks whether we can better make sense of nature for ourselves, and thus participate more meaningfully in momentous decisions about the future of life – human and non-human – on the planet. This book shows how ‘nature’ can be made sense of without presuming its naturalness. The challenge is not so much to rid ourselves of the idea of nature and its ‘collateral concepts’ (such as genes) but instead, we need to be more alert to how, why and with what effects ideas about ‘nature’ get fashioned and deployed in specific situations. Among other things, the book deals with science and scientists, the mass media and journalists, ecotourism, literature and cinema, environmentalists, advertising and big business. This innovative text contains numerous case studies and examples from daily life to put theory and subject matter into context, as well as study tasks, a glossary and suggested further reading. The case studies cover a range of topics, range from forestry in Canada and Guinea, to bestiality in Washington State, to how human genetics is reported in Western newspapers, to participatory science experiments in the UK. Making Sense of Nature will empower readers from a wide range of fields across the social sciences, humanities and physical sciences.

Social Media, Social Genres

Making Sense of the Ordinary

Author: Stine Lomborg

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134080220

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 5960

Internet-based applications such as blogs, social network sites, online chat forums, text messages, microblogs, and location-based communication services used from computers and smart phones represent central resources for organizing daily life and making sense of ourselves and the social worlds we inhabit. This interdisciplinary book explores the meanings of social media as a communicative condition for users in their daily lives; first, through a theoretical framework approaching social media as communicative genres and second, through empirical case studies of personal blogs, Twitter, and Facebook as key instances of the category of "social media," which is still taking shape. Lomborg combines micro-analyses of the communicative functionalities of social media and their place in ordinary people’s wider patterns of media usage and everyday practices.

Food Transgressions

Making Sense of Contemporary Food Politics

Author: Michael K. Goodman,Colin Sage

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317134222

Category: Social Science

Page: 268

View: 3311

Reconnecting so-called alternative food geographies back to the mainstream food system - especially in light of the discursive and material 'transgressions' currently happening between alternative and conventional food networks, this volume critically interrogates and evaluates what stands for 'food politics' in these spaces of transgression now and in the near future and addresses questions such as: What constitutes 'alternative' food politics specifically and food politics more generally when organic and other 'quality' foods have become mainstreamed? What has been the contribution so far of an 'alternative food movement' and its potential to leverage further progressive change and/or make further inroads into conventional systems? What are the empirical and theoretical bases for understanding the established and growing 'transgressions' between conventional and alternative food networks? Offering a better understanding of the evolving position of the corporate food system vis a vis alternative food networks, this book considers the prospects for economic, social, cultural and material transformations led by an increasingly powerful and legitimated alternative food network.

The Political Communication Reader

Author: Ralph M. Negrine,James Stanyer

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780415359368

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 318

View: 2942

This book gathers together key writings on political communication from a range of leading authors, examining both conventional approaches and the newer realities of mediated political communication in advanced industrial democracies.--[book cover]

The Media and the Mayor's Race

The Failure of Urban Political Reporting

Author: Phyllis C. Kaniss

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253209320

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 394

View: 1748

A study of the way a key group of reporters and their news organizations cover a political campaign in Philadelphia. Three methods were used: participant-observation, content analysis, and interviewing. The ultimate intention was not simply to measure and analyze the news coverage of one particular race but to shed light on the underlying processes and organizational structures that influence news coverage of local elections.

The Politics of the Internet

Political Claims-making in Cyberspace and Its Effect on Modern Political Activism

Author: R. J. Maratea

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739178954

Category: Political Science

Page: 195

View: 2218

In The Politics of the Internet: Political Claims-making in Cyberspace and Its Effect on Modern Political Activism, R.J. Maratea examines the Internet’s effect on political claims-making and protest action to show how online technology is helping to shape popular opinion about political issues. The Internet hosts a vast collection of interconnected public cyber-arenas where political claims are continuously disseminated to audiences and social reality is in a perpetual state of negotiation. Unlike more static forms of print and television communication, cyber-arenas can be expanded to carry a nearly infinite amount of claims in a variety of multimedia formats, which can be rapidly disseminated to global audiences for relatively little cost. The corresponding rise of citizen journalism and emergent forms of cyber-activism seemingly reflect how the Internet is revolutionizing the ways claimants attract audiences, acquire resources, and mobilize support, as well as the ways that mainstream journalists report on matters of political importance. Maratea suggests that the Internet has not fundamentally changed how political activists attain cultural relevance. The press still largely determines what issues and activists are recognized by the public, and historically powerful claims-making groups, such as corporate lobbyists, are best positioned to succeed in a supposedly democratized new media world. The analysis offered in The Politics of the Internet will be of particular value to students and scholars of sociology, communications, and political science.

Making Sense of the Alt-Right

Author: George Hawley

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231546009

Category: Political Science

Page: 218

View: 1627

During the 2016 election, a new term entered the mainstream American political lexicon: “alt-right,” short for “alternative right.” Despite the innocuous name, the alt-right is a white-nationalist movement. Yet it differs from earlier racist groups: it is youthful and tech savvy, obsessed with provocation and trolling, amorphous, predominantly online, and mostly anonymous. And it was energized by Donald Trump’s presidential campaign. In Making Sense of the Alt-Right, George Hawley provides an accessible introduction and gives vital perspective on the emergence of a group whose overt racism has confounded expectations for a more tolerant America. Hawley explains the movement’s origins, evolution, methods, and core belief in white-identity politics. The book explores how the alt-right differs from traditional white nationalism, libertarianism, and other online illiberal ideologies such as neoreaction, as well as from mainstream Republicans and even Donald Trump and Steve Bannon. The alt-right’s use of offensive humor and its trolling-driven approach, based in animosity to so-called political correctness, can make it difficult to determine true motivations. Yet through exclusive interviews and a careful study of the alt-right’s influential texts, Hawley is able to paint a full picture of a movement that not only disagrees with liberalism but also fundamentally rejects most of the tenets of American conservatism. Hawley points to the alt-right’s growing influence and makes a case for coming to a precise understanding of its beliefs without sensationalism or downplaying the movement’s radicalism.

How Partisan Media Polarize America

Author: Matthew Levendusky

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022606915X

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 6545

Forty years ago, viewers who wanted to watch the news could only choose from among the major broadcast networks, all of which presented the same news without any particular point of view. Today we have a much broader array of choices, including cable channels offering a partisan take. With partisan programs gaining in popularity, some argue that they are polarizing American politics, while others counter that only a tiny portion of the population watches such programs and that their viewers tend to already hold similar beliefs. In How Partisan Media Polarize America, Matthew Levendusky confirms—but also qualifies—both of these claims. Drawing on experiments and survey data, he shows that Americans who watch partisan programming do become more certain of their beliefs and less willing to weigh the merits of opposing views or to compromise. And while only a small segment of the American population watches partisan media programs, those who do tend to be more politically engaged, and their effects on national politics are therefore far-reaching. In a time when politics seem doomed to partisan discord, How Partisan Media Polarize America offers a much-needed clarification of the role partisan media might play.

Making Sense of Marx

Author: Jon Elster

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521297059

Category: Philosophy

Page: 556

View: 2344

A critical examination of the social theories of Karl Marx.

Where Did You Get This Number?

A Pollster's Guide to Making Sense of the World

Author: Anthony Salvanto

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501174843

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 8248

CBS News’ Elections and Surveys Director Anthony Salvanto takes you behind the scenes of polling to show you how to think about who we are and where we’re headed as a nation. As Elections and Surveys Director for CBS News, it’s Anthony Salvanto’s job to understand you—what you think and how you vote. He’s the person behind so many of the poll numbers you see today, making the winner calls on election nights and surveying thousands of Americans. In Where Did You Get This Number? A Pollster’s Guide to Making Sense of the World, Salvanto takes readers on a fast-paced, eye-opening tour through the world of polling and elections and what they really show about America today, beyond the who's-up-who’s-down headlines and horse races. Salvanto is just the person to bring much-needed clarity in a time when divisions seem to run so deep. The language of polling may be numbers, but the stories it tells are about people. In this engaging insider’s account, Salvanto demystifies jargon with plain language and answers readers’ biggest questions about polling and pollsters. How can they talk to 1,000 people and know the country? How do they know the winner so fast? How do they decide what questions to ask? Why didn't they call you? Salvanto offers data-driven perspective on how Americans see the biggest issues of our time, from the surprising 2016 election, to the shocks of the financial crisis, the response to terrorism and the backlash against big money. He doesn’t shy away from pointing out what’s worked and what hasn’t. Salvanto takes readers inside the CBS newsroom on Election Night 2016 and makes readers rethink conventional wisdom and punditry just in time for the 2018 midterms. He shows who really decides elections and why you should think about a poll differently from the forecasts popularized by Nate Silver and others. Where Did You Get This Number? is an essential resource for anyone interested in politics—and how to better measure and understand patterns of human behavior. For any American who wants to get a better read on what America is thinking, this book shows you how to make sense of it all.

Polarized

Making Sense of a Divided America

Author: James E. Campbell

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400889278

Category: Political Science

Page: 336

View: 3489

Many continue to believe that the United States is a nation of political moderates. In fact, it is a nation divided. It has been so for some time and has grown more so. This book provides a new and historically grounded perspective on the polarization of America, systematically documenting how and why it happened. Polarized presents commonsense benchmarks to measure polarization, draws data from a wide range of historical sources, and carefully assesses the quality of the evidence. Through an innovative and insightful use of circumstantial evidence, it provides a much-needed reality check to claims about polarization. This rigorous yet engaging and accessible book examines how polarization displaced pluralism and how this affected American democracy and civil society. Polarized challenges the widely held belief that polarization is the product of party and media elites, revealing instead how the American public in the 1960s set in motion the increase of polarization. American politics became highly polarized from the bottom up, not the top down, and this began much earlier than often thought. The Democrats and the Republicans are now ideologically distant from each other and about equally distant from the political center. Polarized also explains why the parties are polarized at all, despite their battle for the decisive median voter. No subject is more central to understanding American politics than political polarization, and no other book offers a more in-depth and comprehensive analysis of the subject than this one.