Life and Death on Mt. Everest

Sherpas and Himalayan Mountaineering

Author: Sherry B. Ortner

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691074481

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 5946

Focusing on the relationship between white European and American climbers and their Sherpa guides on Everest climbs throughout this century, the author explores the cultural divides and mutual dependencies that inform these relationships.

Buried in the Sky

The Extraordinary Story of the Sherpa Climbers on K2's Deadliest Day

Author: Peter Zuckerman,Amanda Padoan

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393079880

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 285

View: 418

Presents the stories of the sharps who have acted as expert consultants to Westerners climbing the Himalayas, focusing in particular on Chhiring Dorje Sherpa and Pasang Lama, who survived when 11 other climbers died on K2 in August 2008. 15,000 first printing.

Dead Lucky

Life After Death on Mount Everest

Author: Lincoln Hall

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781440630910

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 532

Lincoln Hall's breathtaking account of surviving a night in Everest's "death zone." Lincoln Hall likes to say that on the evening of May 25, 2006, he died on Everest. Indeed, Hall attempted to climb the mountain during a deadly season in which eleven people perished. And he was, in fact, pronounced dead, after collapsing from altitude sickness. Two Sherpas spent hours trying to revive him, but as darkness fell, word came via radio from the expedition's leader that they should descend in order to save themselves. The news of Hall's death traveled rapidly from mountaineering websites to news media around the world, and ultimately to his family back in Australia. Early the next morning, however, an American guide, climbing with two clients and a Sherpa, was startled to find Hall sitting cross-legged on a sharp crest of the summit ridge. In this page-turning account of survival against all odds, Hall chronicles in fascinating detail the days and nights that led up to his fateful night in Mount Everest's "death zone." His story is all the more miraculous given his climbing history. Hall had been part of Australia's first attempt to reach the top of Everest in 1984 but had not done any major climbing for many years, having set aside his passion in order to support his family. While others in the team achieved their dream during this 1984 expedition, Hall was forced to turn back due to illness. Thus, his triumph in reaching the summit at the age of fifty is a story unto itself. So, too, is Hall's description of his family's experience back in Australia, as sudden grief turned to relief and joy in a matter of hours. Rarely has there been such a thrilling narrative of one man's encounter with the world's tallest mountain.

Fallen Giants

A History of Himalayan Mountaineering from the Age of Empire to the Age of Extremes

Author: Maurice Isserman,Stewart Weaver

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300164203

Category: History

Page: 579

View: 3971

In the first comprehensive history of Himalayan mountaineering in 50 years, the authors offer detailed, original accounts of the most significant climbs since the 1890s, and they compellingly evoke the social and cultural worlds that gave rise to those expeditions.

K2

Life and Death on the World's Most Dangerous Mountain

Author: Ed Viesturs,David Roberts

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 9780767932615

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 352

View: 2135

A thrilling chronicle of the tragedy-ridden history of climbing the world's most difficult and unpredictable mountain, by the bestselling authors of The Mountain and No Shortcuts to the Top Ed Viesturs, one of the world's premier high-altitude mountaineers, explores the remarkable history of K2 and of those who have attempted to conquer it. At the same time, he probes the mountain's most memorable sagas in order to illustrate lessons about the fundamental questions mountaineering raises—questions of risk, ambition, loyalty to one's teammates, self-sacrifice, and the price of glory. Viesturs knows the mountain firsthand. He and renowned alpinist Scott Fischer climbed it in 1992 and got caught in an avalanche that sent them sliding to almost certain death before Ed managed to get into a self-arrest position with his ice ax and stop both his fall and Scott's. Focusing on seven of the mountain's most dramatic campaigns, from his own troubled ascent to the 2008 tragedy, Viesturs crafts an edge-of-your-seat narrative that climbers and armchair travelers alike will find unforgettably compelling. With photographs from Viesturs's personal collection and from historical sources, this is the definitive account of the world's ultimate mountain, and of the lessons that can be gleaned from struggling toward its elusive summit.

Into the Silence

The Great War, Mallory, and the Conquest of Everest

Author: Wade Davis

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307700569

Category: History

Page: 672

View: 9554

The definitive story of the British adventurers who survived the trenches of World War I and went on to risk their lives climbing Mount Everest. On June 6, 1924, two men set out from a camp perched at 23,000 feet on an ice ledge just below the lip of Everest’s North Col. George Mallory, thirty-seven, was Britain’s finest climber. Sandy Irvine was a twenty-two-year-old Oxford scholar with little previous mountaineering experience. Neither of them returned. Drawing on more than a decade of prodigious research, bestselling author and explorer Wade Davis vividly re-creates the heroic efforts of Mallory and his fellow climbers, setting their significant achievements in sweeping historical context: from Britain’s nineteen-century imperial ambitions to the war that shaped Mallory’s generation. Theirs was a country broken, and the Everest expeditions emerged as a powerful symbol of national redemption and hope. In Davis’s rich exploration, he creates a timeless portrait of these remarkable men and their extraordinary times.

Dark Summit

The True Story of Everest's Most Controversial Season

Author: Nick Heil

Publisher: Vintage Canada

ISBN: 030736951X

Category: Travel

Page: 288

View: 8972

In the tradition of Jon Krakauer’s Into Thin Air, Nick Heil recounts the harrowing story of the deadly and controversial 2006 climbing season on Everest. In early May 2006, a young British climber named David Sharp lay dying near the top of Mount Everest while forty other climbers walked past him on their way to the summit. A week later, Lincoln Hall, a seasoned Australian climber, was left for dead near the same spot. Hall’s death was reported around the world, but the next day he was found alive after spending the night on the upper mountain with no food and no shelter. If David Sharp’s death was shocking, it was not singular: despite unusually good weather, ten others died attempting to reach the summit that year. In this meticulous inquiry into what went wrong, Nick Heil tells the full story of the deadliest year on Everest since the infamous season of 1996. He introduces Russell Brice, the outfitter who has done more than anyone to provide access to the summit via the mountain’s north side–and who some believe was partially responsible for Sharp’s death. As more climbers attempt the summit each year, Heil shows how increasingly risky expeditions and unscrupulous outfitters threaten to turn Everest into a deadly circus. Written by an experienced climber and outdoor writer, Dark Summit is both a riveting account of a notorious climbing season and a troubling investigation into whether the pursuit of the ultimate mountaineering prize has spiralled out of control. From the Hardcover edition.

Sherpa

The Memoir of Ang Tharkay

Author: Ang Tharkay

Publisher: Mountaineers Books

ISBN: 1594859981

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 192

View: 5057

CLICK HERE to download a sample from Sherpa • Ang Tharkay was the sirdar for Maurice Herzog’s Annapurna expedition in 1950—the first 8000-meter peak to be climbed • Ang Tharkay was a key member of the 1951 reconnaissance of Everest—which led to the successful 1953 ascent Sherpas have recently been in the public eye, in part because of the 2013 Everest “brawl,” the 2014 avalanche that took the lives of thirteen climbing Sherpas, and the 2015 earthquake that devastated Nepal. These events and others have led to much public discussion about how Sherpas today are treated and viewed by their Western employers. Sherpa expands our understanding of these issues by providing historical context. The autobiography of Ang Tharkay, who was born in 1908 and became one of the most renowned Sherpas of early Himalayan exploration, has long been a collector’s item in the original French-language edition but it has never been available in English until now. In Sherpa, Tharkay describes his experiences traveling with Eric Shipton and H.W. Tilman and as the sirdar (head Sherpa) on Maurice Herzog’s 1950 ascent of Annapurna. Few such Sherpa accounts have been written, and fewer still from these early Himalayan expeditions. Opening with a brief account of Tharkay’s childhood and background, Sherpa then immerses readers in expeditions on Everest, Nanga Parbat, and, of course, Annapurna. Tharkay reveals some of the politics within the Sherpa support teams: petty arguments and shared struggles that went unnoticed or at least unrecorded by those who hired them. Tharkay’s admiration of his employers is leavened with his recognition of their shortcomings, but his affection for the climbers who employed him, and theirs for him, radiates throughout the story. Sherpa includes an original foreword by Tashi Sherpa, founder of Sherpa Adventure Gear and the nephew of Ang Tharkay. He remembers how he and his young cousins worshipped “Agu” (Uncle) as a respected mountaineer and hero, a warm and safe presence for the family. This title is part of our LEGENDS AND LORE series. Click here > to learn more.

Into Thin Air

Author: Jon Krakauer

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 0679462716

Category: Travel

Page: 320

View: 9681

When Jon Krakauer reached the summit of Mt. Everest in the early afternoon of May 10,1996, he hadn't slept in fifty-seven hours and was reeling from the brain-altering effects of oxygen depletion. As he turned to begin the perilous descent from 29,028 feet (roughly the cruising altitude of an Airbus jetliner), twenty other climbers were still pushing doggedly to the top, unaware that the sky had begun to roil with clouds... Into Thin Air is the definitive account of the deadliest season in the history of Everest by the acclaimed Outside journalist and author of the bestselling Into the Wild. Taking the reader step by step from Katmandu to the mountain's deadly pinnacle, Krakauer has his readers shaking on the edge of their seat. Beyond the terrors of this account, however, he also peers deeply into the myth of the world's tallest mountain. What is is about Everest that has compelled so many poeple--including himself--to throw caution to the wind, ignore the concerns of loved ones, and willingly subject themselves to such risk, hardship, and expense? Written with emotional clarity and supported by his unimpeachable reporting, Krakauer's eyewitness account of what happened on the roof of the world is a singular achievement. From the Paperback edition.

Tigers of the Snow

How One Fateful Climb Made The Sherpas Mountaineering Legends

Author: Jonathan Neale

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9781429978583

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 320

View: 6900

The true story of the tragedy and survival on one of the world's most dangerous mountains. In 1922 Himalayan climbers were British gentlemen, and their Sherpa and Tibetan porters were "coolies," unskilled and inexperienced casual laborers. By 1953 Sherpa Tenzing Norgay stood on the summit of Everest, and the coolies had become the "Tigers of the Snow." Jonathan Neale's absorbing new book is both a compelling history of the oft-forgotten heroes of mountaineering and a gripping account of the expedition that transformed the Sherpas into climbing legends. In 1934 a German-led team set off to climb the Himalayan peak of Nanga Parbat, the ninth highest mountain on earth. After a disastrous assault in 1895, no attempt had been made to conquer the mountain for thirty-nine years. The new Nazi government was determined to prove German physical superiority to the rest of the world. A heavily funded expedition was under pressure to deliver results. Like all climbers of the time, they did not really understand what altitude did to the human body. When a hurricane hit the leading party just short of the summit, the strongest German climbers headed down and left the weaker Germans and the Sherpas to die on the ridge. What happened in the next few days of death and fear changed forever how the Sherpa climbers thought of themselves. From that point on, they knew they were the decent and responsible people of the mountain. Jonathan Neale interviewed many old Sherpa men and women, including Ang Tsering, the last man off Nanga Parbat alive in 1934. Impeccably researched and superbly written, Tigers of the Snow is the compelling narrative of a climb gone wrong, set against the mountaineering history of the early twentieth century, the haunting background of German politics in the 1930s, and the hardship and passion of life in the Sherpa valleys.

High Adventure

Author: Edmund Hillary

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0195167341

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 245

View: 2173

"With nimble words and a straightforward style, New Zealand mountaineering legend Hillary recollects the bravery and frustration, the agony and glory that marked his Everest odyssey. From the 1951 expedition that led to the discovery of the southern route, through the grueling Himalayan training of 1952, and on to the successful 1953 expedition led by Colonel John Hunt, Hillary conveys in precise language the mountain's unforgiving conditions. In explicit detail he recalls an Everest where chaotic icefalls force costly detours, unstable snow ledges promise to avalanche at the slightest misstep, and brutal weather shifts from pulse-stopping cold to fiendish heat in mere minutes.".

New Jersey Dreaming

Capital, Culture, and the Class of ‘58

Author: Sherry B. Ortner

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822331087

Category: History

Page: 340

View: 1991

Famed anthropologist Ortner tracks down representative classmates from her mostly Jewish Newark, NJ high school class of '58 in order to examine class culture and ethnicity in America today.

Himalayan Herders

Author: Naomi Hawes Bishop

Publisher: Brooks/Cole Publishing Company

ISBN: 9780534440602

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 805


The Mountain

My Time on Everest

Author: Ed Viesturs

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 145169475X

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 352

View: 404

In national bestseller The Mountain, world-renowned climber and bestselling author Ed Viesturs and cowriter David Roberts paint a vivid portrait of obsession, dedication, and human achievement in a true love letter to the world’s highest peak. In The Mountain, veteran world-class climber and bestselling author Ed Viesturs—the only American to have climbed all fourteen of the world’s 8,000-meter peaks—trains his sights on Mount Everest in richly detailed accounts of expeditions that are by turns personal, harrowing, deadly, and inspiring. The highest mountain on earth, Everest remains the ultimate goal for serious high-altitude climbers. Viesturs has gone on eleven expeditions to Everest, spending more than two years of his life on the mountain and reaching the summit seven times. No climber today is better poised to survey Everest’s various ascents—both personal and historic. Viesturs sheds light on the fate of Mallory and Irvine, whose 1924 disappearance just 800 feet from the summit remains one of mountaineering’s greatest mysteries, as well as the multiply tragic last days of Rob Hall and Scott Fischer in 1996, the stuff of which Into Thin Air was made. Informed by the experience of one who has truly been there, The Mountain affords a rare glimpse into that place on earth where Heraclitus’s maxim—“Character is destiny”—is proved time and again.

Snow in the Kingdom

My Storm Years on Everest

Author: Ed Webster

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 580

View: 2627

The story of Ed Webster's 5 years on and off of Everest.

Doctor on Everest

Emergency Medicine at the Top of the World - A Personal Account of the 1996 Disaster

Author: Kenneth Kamler

Publisher: Lyons Press

ISBN: 9781585745999

Category: Travel

Page: 344

View: 4792


Master of Thin Air

Life and Death on the World's Highest Peaks

Author: Andrew Lock

Publisher: Skyhorse

ISBN: 1628726164

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 364

View: 4208

The true story of a man who climbed the world’s fourteen tallest mountains—named one of Backpacker’s “Five Adventure Books You Need to Read This Summer.” On Earth, there are only fourteen mountains exceeding 8,000 meters (26,000-plus feet). Beyond that height, any climbers who dare to go on are walking into a death zone where there’s not enough oxygen for humans to breathe. But Australian mountaineer Andrew Lock wanted to do more than climb and survive just one of these killer mountains—he wanted to conquer them all. Here, he tells the harrowing, heartbreaking, and ultimately triumphant account of his sixteen-year journey to summit the world’s “eight-thousanders”—which he accomplished without the aid of bottled oxygen for all but one mountain. Climbing solo or in small teams without Sherpa guides, Lock went on twenty-three expeditions, spending a total of three years of his life ascending these dangerous ranges—losing more than twenty climbing friends and, in April 2014, witnessing Mount Everest’s deadliest avalanche. Master of Thin Air is the riveting, thrilling account of what it takes to challenge the planet’s highest peaks and survive. It tells of death-defying ascents and even riskier descents, the gut-dropping consequences of the smallest mistakes or plain bad luck, the camaraderie and human drama of expeditions, and the sheer exhilaration of altitude. It is also the inspiring story of what motivates a person to achieve an extraordinary dream, a story of passion, resourcefulness, self-motivation, and hope—even at the edge of death.

Chasing the glory

travels across America

Author: Michael Parfit

Publisher: Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing

ISBN: 9780020356806

Category: Travel

Page: 353

View: 3643

This is the story of a year in Michael Parfit's life--a year spent crisscrossing America by solo plane, following a route first flown by Charles Lindbergh shortly after his epochal 1927 solo transatlantic flight.

Anthropology and Social Theory

Author: Sherry B. Ortner

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822388456

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

View: 1460

In Anthropology and Social Theory the award-winning anthropologist Sherry B. Ortner draws on her longstanding interest in theories of cultural practice to rethink key concepts of culture, agency, and subjectivity for the social sciences of the twenty-first century. The seven theoretical and interpretive essays in this volume each advocate reconfiguring, rather than abandoning, the concept of culture. Similarly, they all suggest that a theory which depends on the interested action of social beings—specifically practice theory, associated especially with the work of Pierre Bourdieu—requires a more developed notion of human agency and a richer conception of human subjectivity. Ortner shows how social theory must both build upon and move beyond classic practice theory in order to understand the contemporary world. Some of the essays reflect explicitly on theoretical concerns: the relationship between agency and power, the problematic quality of ethnographic studies of resistance, and the possibility of producing an anthropology of subjectivity. Others are ethnographic studies that apply Ortner’s theoretical framework. In these, she investigates aspects of social class, looking at the relationship between race and middle-class identity in the United States, the often invisible nature of class as a cultural identity and as an analytical category in social inquiry, and the role that public culture and media play in the creation of the class anxieties of Generation X. Written with Ortner’s characteristic lucidity, these essays constitute a major statement about the future of social theory from one of the leading anthropologists of our time.