Laughter Out of Place

Race, Class, Violence, and Sexuality in a Rio Shantytown

Author: Donna Goldstein

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520955412

Category: Social Science

Page: 392

View: 7842

Donna M. Goldstein presents a hard-hitting critique of urban poverty and violence and challenges much of what we think we know about the "culture of poverty" in this compelling read. Drawing on more than a decade of experience in Brazil, Goldstein provides an intimate portrait of everyday life among the women of the favelas, or urban shantytowns in Rio de Janeiro, who cope with unbearable suffering, violence and social abandonment. The book offers a clear-eyed view of socially conditioned misery while focusing on the creative responses—absurdist and black humor—that people generate amid daily conditions of humiliation, anger, and despair. Goldstein helps us to understand that such joking and laughter is part of an emotional aesthetic that defines the sense of frustration and anomie endemic to the political and economic desperation among residents of the shantytown.

Laughter Out of Place

Race, Class, Violence, and Sexuality in a Rio Shantytown

Author: Donna M. Goldstein

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520276043

Category: Social Science

Page: 349

View: 4345

Drawing on the author's experience in Brazil, this text provides a portrait of everyday life among the women of the favelas - a portrait that challenges much of what we think we know about the 'culture of poverty'. It helps us understand the nature of joking and laughter in the shantytown.

Laughter Out of Place

Race, Class, Violence, and Sexuality in a Rio Shantytown

Author: Donna M. Goldstein

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520235975

Category: Social Science

Page: 349

View: 642

Annotation Drawing on more than a decade of experience in Brazil, Donna M. Goldstein provides an intimate portrait of everyday life among the women of the favelas--a portrait that challenges much of what we think we know about the "culture of poverty." Confronted with these women's absurdist and black-humored storytelling practices in the face of trauma and tragedy, Goldstein helps us to understand such joking and laughter--so disruptive of "universal" notions of normality and ethics--as part of an emotional aesthetic that defines the sense of frustration and anomie endemic to the political and economic desperation of the shantytown.

Women's Health in Post-Soviet Russia

The Politics of Intervention

Author: Michele R. Rivkin-Fish

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253217677

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 7735

"An unparalleled study of a transforming and privatizing Russian health care system, of the promises and perils of prescriptive programs for change, that points to the areas that need change in the change-makers themselves.... part of a larger story about the inherent dangers of current neoliberal economic transformations of fragile post-socialist social welfare arrangements.... "Rivkin-Fish takes the reader into a new understanding of the fragile and tense relations between state and market transitions, and into the deep and largely silent struggle for gender and health equity in Russia." —Adriana Petryna, author of Life Exposed: Biological Citizens after Chernobyl In the first decade after the collapse of the Soviet Union, deteriorating public health indicators such as below-replacement fertility and high rates of sexually transmitted diseases, abortions, birth traumas, and maternal mortality raised acute anxieties about Russia's future. This study documents the efforts of global and local experts, and ordinary Russian women in St. Petersburg, to explain Russia's maternal health problems and devise reforms to solve them. Examining both official health projects and informal daily practices, Michele Rivkin-Fish draws ethnographic and theoretical insights about the contested processes of interpreting and managing neo-liberal transitions in Russia and explores the challenges of bringing anthropological insights to public health interventions for women's empowerment.

Deaf in Japan

Signing and the Politics of Identity

Author: Karen Nakamura

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801473562

Category: History

Page: 226

View: 9016

A groundbreaking study of deaf identity, minority politics, and sign language, traces the history of the deaf community in Japan.

The Ghosts of Empire

Violence, Suffering and Mobility in the Transatlantic Cultural Economy of Desire

Author: Samuel Veissière

Publisher: LIT Verlag Münster

ISBN: 3643900805

Category: Social Science

Page: 190

View: 4832

Set against the background of nighttime encounters in the rough streets of Brazil's Salvador da Bahia, this experimental ethnography explores how certain transnational characters are at once co-constructed and reinvented through the legacy of conquest and the global inequalities of late capitalism. Theorizing the desires that drive these encounters as forms of colonial violence and sincere emancipatory strategies, author Samuel Veissiere's gaze travels outward across the Atlantic and the historical violence of empire, and then turns back inward to revisit the violence of his own white colonial desires. (Series: Contributions to Transnational Feminism - Vol. 3)

Intersecting Inequalities

Women and Social Policy in Peru, 1990-2000

Author: Jelke Boesten

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 0271036702

Category: Social Science

Page: 174

View: 9371

"Examines how food aid, population policies and policy against domestic violence reflected and reproduced existing inequalities based on race, class and gender in 1990s Peru"--Provided by publisher.

Chocolate and Corn Flour

History, Race, and Place in the Making of “Black” Mexico

Author: Laura A. Lewis

Publisher: Duke University Press Books

ISBN: 9780822351320

Category: Social Science

Page: 388

View: 7676

Located on Mexico's Pacific coast in a historically black part of the Costa Chica region, the town of San Nicolás has been identified as a center of Afromexican culture by Mexican cultural authorities, journalists, activists, and foreign anthropologists. The majority of the town's residents, however, call themselves morenos (black Indians). In Chocolate and Corn Flour, Laura A. Lewis explores the history and contemporary culture of San Nicolás, focusing on the ways that local inhabitants experience and understand race, blackness, and indigeneity, as well as on the cultural values that outsiders place on the community and its residents. Drawing on more than a decade of fieldwork, Lewis offers a richly detailed and subtle ethnography of the lives and stories of the people of San Nicolás, including community residents who have migrated to the United States. San Nicoladenses, she finds, have complex attitudes toward blackness—as a way of identifying themselves and as a racial and cultural category. They neither consider themselves part of an African diaspora nor deny their heritage. Rather, they acknowledge their hybridity and choose to identify most deeply with their community.

Standing in the Need

Culture, Comfort, and Coming Home After Katrina

Author: Katherine E. Browne

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 1477307397

Category: Social Science

Page: 281

View: 7217

Standing in the Need presents an intimate account of an African American family’s ordeal after Hurricane Katrina. Before the storm struck, this family of one hundred fifty members lived in the bayou communities of St. Bernard Parish just outside New Orleans. Rooted there like the wild red iris of the coastal wetlands, the family had gathered for generations to cook and share homemade seafood meals, savor conversation, and refresh their interconnected lives. In this lively narrative, Katherine Browne weaves together voices and experiences from eight years of post-Katrina research. Her story documents the heartbreaking struggles to remake life after everyone in the family faced ruin. Cast against a recovery landscape managed by outsiders, the efforts of family members to help themselves could get no traction; outsiders undermined any sense of their control over the process. In the end, the insights of the story offer hope. Written for a broad audience and supported by an array of photographs and graphics, Standing in the Need offers readers an inside view of life at its most vulnerable.

Conformity and Conflict

Readings in Cultural Anthropology

Author: James P. Spradley,David W. McCurdy

Publisher: Jill Potash

ISBN: 0205234100

Category: Social Science

Page: 411

View: 2920

Demonstrate the nature of culture and its influence on people's lives. For over 40 years, the best-selling Conformity and Conflict has brought together original readings and cutting edge research alongside classic works as a powerful way to study human behavior and events. Its readings cover a broad range of theoretical perspectives and demonstrate basic anthropological concepts. The Fourteenth Edition incorporates successful articles from past editions and fresh ideas from the field to show fascinating perspectives on the human experience. Teaching and Learning Experience Personalize Learning - MyAnthroLab delivers proven results in helping students succeed, provides engaging experiences that personalize learning, and comes from a trusted partner with educational expertise and a deep commitment to helping students and instructors achieve their goals. Improve Critical Thinking - Articles, article introductions and review questions encourage students to examine their assumptions, discern hidden values, evaluate evidence, assess their conclusions, and more! Engage Students - Section parts, key terms, maps, a glossary and subject index all spark student interest and illustrate the reader's main points with examples and visuals from daily life. Support Instructors - Teaching your course just got easier! You can create a Customized Text or use our Instructor's Manual, Electronic “MyTest” Test Bank or PowerPoint Presentation Slides. Additionally, Conformity and Conflict's part introductions parallel the basic concepts taught in introductory courses – which allow the book to be used alone as a reader or in conjunction with a main text. Note: MyAnthroLab does not come automatically packaged with this text. To purchase MyAnthroLab, please visit www.MyAnthroLab.com or you can purchase a valuepack of the text + MyAnthroLab (at no additional cost): VP ISBN-10: 0205176011/ISBN-13: 9780205176014

Blind Spot

How Neoliberalism Infiltrated Global Health

Author: M.D. Salmaan Keshavjee

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 052095873X

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 2215

Neoliberalism has been the defining paradigm in global health since the latter part of the twentieth century. What started as an untested and unproven theory that the creation of unfettered markets would give rise to political democracy led to policies that promoted the belief that private markets were the optimal agents for the distribution of social goods, including health care. A vivid illustration of the infiltration of neoliberal ideology into the design and implementation of development programs, this case study, set in post-Soviet Tajikistan’s remote eastern province of Badakhshan, draws on extensive ethnographic and historical material to examine a "revolving drug fund" program—used by numerous nongovernmental organizations globally to address shortages of high-quality pharmaceuticals in poor communities. Provocative, rigorous, and accessible, Blind Spot offers a cautionary tale about the forces driving decision making in health and development policy today, illustrating how the privatization of health care can have catastrophic outcomes for some of the world’s most vulnerable populations.

Global Outlaws

Crime, Money, and Power in the Contemporary World

Author: Carolyn Nordstrom

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520940636

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 4138

Carolyn Nordstrom explores the pathways of global crime in this stunning work of anthropology that has the power to change the way we think about the world. To write this book, she spent three years traveling to hot spots in Africa, Europe, Asia, and the United States investigating the dynamics of illegal trade around the world—from blood diamonds and arms to pharmaceuticals, exotica, and staples like food and oil. Global Outlaws peels away the layers of a vast economy that extends from a war orphan in Angola selling Marlboros on the street to powerful transnational networks reaching across continents and oceans. Nordstrom's extraordinary fieldwork includes interviews with scores of informants, including the smugglers, victims, power elite, and profiteers who populate these economic war zones. Her compelling investigation, showing that the sum total of extra-legal activities represents a significant part of the world's economy, provides a new framework for understanding twenty-first-century economics and economic power. Global Outlaws powerfully reveals the illusions and realities of security in all areas of transport and trade and illuminates many of the difficult ethical problems these extra-legal activities pose.

Righteous Dopefiend

Author: Philippe I. Bourgois,Jeffrey Schonberg

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520230880

Category: Social Science

Page: 359

View: 7920

Explores the world of homelessness and drug addiction in contemporary United States, discussing such themes as violence, race relations, sexuality, family trauma, social inequality, and power relations.

Righteous Dopefiend

Author: Philippe Bourgois,Jeffrey Schonberg

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520943317

Category: Social Science

Page: 392

View: 9376

This powerful study immerses the reader in the world of homelessness and drug addiction in the contemporary United States. For over a decade Philippe Bourgois and Jeff Schonberg followed a social network of two dozen heroin injectors and crack smokers on the streets of San Francisco, accompanying them as they scrambled to generate income through burglary, panhandling, recycling, and day labor. Righteous Dopefiend interweaves stunning black-and-white photographs with vivid dialogue, detailed field notes, and critical theoretical analysis. Its gripping narrative develops a cast of characters around the themes of violence, race relations, sexuality, family trauma, embodied suffering, social inequality, and power relations. The result is a dispassionate chronicle of survival, loss, caring, and hope rooted in the addicts' determination to hang on for one more day and one more "fix" through a "moral economy of sharing" that precariously balances mutual solidarity and interpersonal betrayal.

The Everyday Language of White Racism

Author: Jane H. Hill

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444304749

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 711

In The Everyday Language of White Racism, Jane H. Hill provides an incisive analysis of everyday language to reveal the underlying racist stereotypes that continue to circulate in American culture. provides a detailed background on the theory of race and racism reveals how racializing discourse—talk and text that produces and reproduces ideas about races and assigns people to them—facilitates a victim-blaming logic integrates a broad and interdisciplinary range of literature from sociology, social psychology, justice studies, critical legal studies, philosophy, literature, and other disciplines that have studied racism, as well as material from anthropology and sociolinguistics Part of the Blackwell Studies in Discourse and Culture Series

New Poverty Studies

The Ethnography of Power, Politics, and Impoverished People in the United States

Author: Judith G. Goode,Jeff Maskovsky

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814731163

Category: Social Science

Page: 494

View: 8101

Diasporic Africa presents the most recent research on the history and experiences of people of African descent outside of the African continent. By incorporating Europe and North Africa as well as North America, Latin America, and the Caribbean, this reader shifts the discourse on the African diaspora away from its focus solely on the Americas, underscoring the fact that much of the movement of people of African descent took place in Old World contexts. This broader view allows for a more comprehensive approach to the study of the African diaspora. The volume provides an overview of African diaspora studies and features as a major concern a rigorous interrogation of "identity." Other primary themes include contributions to western civilization, from religion, music, and sports to agricultural production and medicine, as well as the way in which our understanding of the African diaspora fits into larger studies of transnational phenomena.

Where the River Ends

Contested Indigeneity in the Mexican Colorado Delta

Author: Shaylih Muehlmann

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822354454

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 5588

Where the River Ends examines the response of the Cucapá people of Mexico's northwest coast to the state's claim that they are not "indigenous enough" to merit the special fishing rights which would allow them to subsist during environmental crisis.

The Worlding Project

Doing Cultural Studies in the Era of Globalization

Author: Rob Wilson,Christopher Leigh Connery

Publisher: North Atlantic Books

ISBN: 9781556436802

Category: Political Science

Page: 243

View: 5528

Globalization discourse now presumes that the “world space” is entirely at the mercy of market norms and forms promulgated by reactionary U.S. policies. An academic but accessible set of studies, this wide range of essays by noted scholars challenges this paradigm with diverse and strong arguments. Taking on topics that range from the medieval Mediterranean to contemporary Jamaican music, from Hong Kong martial arts cinema to Taiwanese politics, writers such as David Palumbo-Liu, Meaghan Morris, James Clifford, and others use innovative cultural studies to challenge the globalization narrative with a new and trenchant tactic called “worlding.” The book posits that world literature, cultural studies, and disciplinary practices must be “worlded” into expressions from disparate critical angles of vision, multiple frameworks, and field practices as yet emerging or unidentified. This opens up a major rethinking of historical “givens” from Rob Wilson’s reinvention of “The White Surfer Dude” to Sharon Kinoshita’s “Deprovincializing the Middle Ages.” Building on the work of cultural critics like Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak, and Kenneth Burke, The Worlding Project is an important manifesto that aims to redefine the aesthetics and politics of postcolonial globalization withalternative forms and frames of global becoming.

Children as Caregivers

The Global Fight against Tuberculosis and HIV in Zambia

Author: Jean Hunleth

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813588057

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 3344

In Zambia, due to the rise of tuberculosis and the closely connected HIV epidemic, a large number of children have experienced the illness or death of at least one parent. Children as Caregivers examines how well intentioned practitioners fail to realize that children take on active caregiving roles when their guardians become seriously ill and demonstrates why understanding children’s care is crucial for global health policy. Using ethnographic methods, and listening to the voices of the young as well as adults, Jean Hunleth makes the caregiving work of children visible. She shows how children actively seek to “get closer” to ill guardians by providing good care. Both children and ill adults define good care as attentiveness of the young to adults’ physical needs, the ability to carry out treatment and medication programs in the home, and above all, the need to maintain physical closeness and proximity. Children understand that losing their guardians will not only be emotionally devastating, but that such loss is likely to set them adrift in Zambian society, where education and advancement depend on maintaining familial, reciprocal relationships. View a gallery of images from the book (https://www.flickr.com/photos/childrenascaregivers)