Journal of a Cruise Made to the Pacific Ocean, Vol. 1 of 2 (Classic Reprint)

Author: David Porter

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 9780666511379

Category: Travel

Page: 600

View: 8757

Excerpt from Journal of a Cruise Made to the Pacific Ocean, Vol. 1 of 2 ON the first publication of this Journal, the author took occasion to acknowledge its deficiencies, and to disclaim all pretensions to the honours of author ship. He stated that it was prepared in haste, and published without revisal, to gratify his friends rather than as a tribute to his own vanity. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Free Trade and Sailors' Rights in the War of 1812

Author: Paul A. Gilje

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107025087

Category: History

Page: 425

View: 8458

This book examines the political slogan "free trade and sailors rights" and traces its sources to eighteenth-century intellectual thought and Americans' previous experience with impressment into the British navy. The book details the diplomatic history surrounding the War of 1812 and provides a brief narrative of the conflict itself. The book also follows the history of the slogan into the Jacksonian period.

The View from the Masthead

Maritime Imagination and Antebellum American Sea Narratives

Author: Hester Blum

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469606550

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 2141

With long, solitary periods at sea, far from literary and cultural centers, sailors comprise a remarkable population of readers and writers. Although their contributions have been little recognized in literary history, seamen were important figures in the nineteenth-century American literary sphere. In the first book to explore their unique contribution to literary culture, Hester Blum examines the first-person narratives of working sailors, from little-known sea tales to more famous works by Herman Melville, James Fenimore Cooper, Edgar Allan Poe, and Richard Henry Dana. In their narratives, sailors wrote about how their working lives coexisted with--indeed, mutually drove--their imaginative lives. Even at leisure, they were always on the job site. Blum analyzes seamen's libraries, Barbary captivity narratives, naval memoirs, writings about the Galapagos Islands, Melville's sea vision, and the crisis of death and burial at sea. She argues that the extent of sailors' literacy and the range of their reading were unusual for a laboring class, belying the popular image of Jack Tar as merely a swaggering, profane, or marginal figure. As Blum demonstrates, seamen's narratives propose a method for aligning labor and contemplation that has broader applications for the study of American literature and history.

The Ancient Hawaiian State

Origins of a Political Society

Author: Robert J. Hommon

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199916128

Category: History

Page: 322

View: 6043

Drawing on archaeological and ethnohistorical sources, this book redefines the study of primary states by arguing for the inclusion of Polynesia, which witnessed the development of primary states in both Hawaii and Tonga.

Sea of Glory

America's Voyage of Discovery, The U.S. Exploring Expedition, 1838-1842

Author: Nathaniel Philbrick

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781440649103

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 5883

"A treasure of a book."—David McCullough A New York Times Notable Book America's first frontier was not the West; it was the sea, and no one writes more eloquently about that watery wilderness than Nathaniel Philbrick. In his bestselling In the Heart of the Sea Philbrick probed the nightmarish dangers of the vast Pacific. Now, in an epic sea adventure, he writes about one of the most ambitious voyages of discovery the Western world has ever seen—the U.S. Exploring Expedition of 1838–1842. On a scale that dwarfed the journey of Lewis and Clark, six magnificent sailing vessels and a crew of hundreds set out to map the entire Pacific Ocean and ended up naming the newly discovered continent of Antarctica, collecting what would become the basis of the Smithsonian Institution. Combining spellbinding human drama and meticulous research, Philbrick reconstructs the dark saga of the voyage to show why, instead of being celebrated and revered as that of Lewis and Clark, it has—until now—been relegated to a footnote in the national memory. Winner of the Theodore and Franklin D. Roosevelt Naval History Prize

Through a Glass Darkly

Reflections on Personal Identity in Early America

Author: Ronald Hoffman,Mechal Sobel,Fredrika J. Teute

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9780807846445

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 3253

These thirteen original essays are provocative explorations in the construction and representation of self in America's colonial and early republican eras. Highlighting the increasing importance of interdisciplinary research for the field of early America

Nothing Too Daring

A Biography of Commodore David Porter, 1783-1843

Author: David Long

Publisher: Naval Institute Press

ISBN: 1612513190

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 1562

Commodore David Dixon Porter made history when he took the Essex into the Pacific and crippled the British whaling industry in the War of 1812. He was the first to suggest that the U.S. Navy force open Japan. He was also court-martialed and convicted on charges arising out of his unauthorized invasion of Spanish Puerto Rico. He later sought to reverse his fortunes in the Mexican Navy, and consistently suffered chaos in his personal and financial affairs. As the first U.S. chargé d’affaires in Constantinople he established direct diplomatic relations between the U.S. and the Ottoman Empire. Porter was courageous, passionate, intelligent, far-sighted, dedicated, and generous. Yet he was at the same time impulsive, avaricious, hot-tempered, conceited, sometimes vicious, and finally paranoiac. Nothing Too Daring offers an objective, thoroughly researched biography of one of America’s most colorful naval officers.

When America First Met China: An Exotic History of Tea, Drugs, and Money in the Age of Sail

Author: Eric Jay Dolin

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0871404338

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 394

View: 7632

Traces the history of the relationship between America and China back to its earliest days, when the United States traded with China for furs, opium and rare sea cucumbers, but left an ecological and human rights disaster that still reverberates today.

Every Man Will Do His Duty

An Anthology of Firsthand Accounts from the Age of Nelson 1793–1815

Author: Dean King,John B. Hattendorf

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1453238328

Category: History

Page: 444

View: 537

Twenty-two enthralling stories of the Royal Navy, bringing to vivid life the greatest battles and daily struggles of seafaring in the Napoleonic era At the dawn of the nineteenth century, the British Navy was the mightiest instrument of war the world had ever known. The Royal Navy patrolled the seas from India to the Caribbean, connecting an empire with footholds in every corner of the earth. Such a massive Navy required the service of more than 100,000 men—from officers to deckhands to surgeons. These are their stories. The inspiration for the bestselling novels by Patrick O’Brian and C. S. Forester, these memoirs and diaries, edited by Dean King, provide a true portrait of life aboard British warships during one of the most significant eras of world history. Their tellers are officers and ordinary sailors, and their subjects range from barroom brawls to the legendary heroics of Lord Horatio Nelson himself. Though these “iron men on wooden ships” are long gone, their deeds echo through the centuries.

The Galapagos

A Natural History

Author: Henry Nicholls

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465035957

Category: Science

Page: 224

View: 8331

The natural and human history of the Galapagos Islands—beloved vacation spot, fiery volcanic chain, and one of the critical sites in the history of science The Galapagos were once known to the sailors and pirates who encountered them as Las Encantadas: the enchanted islands, home to exotic creatures and dramatic volcanic scenery. In The Galapagos, science writer Henry Nicholls offers a lively natural and human history of the archipelago, charting its evolution from deserted wilderness to scientific resource (made famous by Charles Darwin) and global ecotourism hot spot. He describes the island chain's fiery geological origins as well as the long history of human interaction with it, and draws vivid portraits of the Galapagos' diverse life forms, capturing its awe-inspiring landscapes, its understated flora, its stunning wildlife and, crucially, the origin of new species. Finally, he considers the immense challenges facing the islands and what lies ahead. Nicholls shows that what happens in the Galapagos is not merely an isolated concern, but reflects the future of our species' relationship with nature—and the fate of our planet.

Ships of Oak, Guns of Iron

The War of 1812 and the Forging of the American Navy

Author: Ronald Utt

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1621570088

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 1185

The War of 1812 is typically noted for a handful of events: the burning of the White House, the rise of the Star Spangled Banner, and the battle of New Orleans. But in fact the greatest consequence of that distant conflict was the birth of the U.S. Navy. During the War of 1812, America’s tiny fleet took on the mightiest naval power on earth, besting the British in a string of victories that stunned both nations. In his new book, Ships of Oak and Guns of Iron: The War of 1812 and the Birth of the American Navy, author Dr. Ronald Utt not only sheds new light on the naval battles of the War of 1812 and how they gave birth to our nation’s great navy, but tells the story of the War of 1812 through the portraits of famous American war heroes. From the cunning Stephen Decatur to the fierce David Porter, Ships of Oak and Guns of Iron relates how thousands of American men and boys gave better than they got against the British Navy. The great age of fighting sail is as rich in heroic drama as any epoch. Dr. Utt’s Ships of Oak and Guns of Iron retrieves the American chapter of that epoch from unjustified obscurity, and offers readers an intriguing chronicle of the War of 1812 as well as a unique perspective on the birth of the U.S. Navy.

If By Sea

The Forging of the American Navy--from the Revolution to the War of 1812

Author: George C. Daughan

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0786731931

Category: History

Page: 568

View: 7818

The American Revolution-and thus the history of the United States-began not on land but on the sea. Paul Revere began his famous midnight ride not by jumping on a horse, but by scrambling into a skiff with two other brave patriots to cross Boston Harbor to Charlestown. Revere and his companions rowed with muffled oars to avoid capture by the British warships closely guarding the harbor. As they paddled silently, Revere's neighbor was flashing two lanterns from the belfry of Old North Church, signaling patriots in Charlestown that the redcoats were crossing the Charles River in longboats. In every major Revolutionary battle thereafter the sea would play a vital, if historically neglected, role. When the American colonies took up arms against Great Britain, they were confronting the greatest sea-power of the age. And it was during the War of Independence that the American Navy was born. But following the British naval model proved crushingly expensive, and the Founding Fathers fought viciously for decades over whether or not the fledgling republic truly needed a deep-water fleet. The debate ended only when the Federal Navy proved indispensable during the War of 1812. Drawing on decades of prodigious research, historian George C. Daughan chronicles the embattled origins of the U.S. Navy. From the bloody and gunpowder-drenched battles fought by American sailors on lakes and high seas to the fierce rhetorical combat waged by the Founders in Congress, If By Sea charts the course by which the Navy became a vital and celebrated American institution.

Grass Huts and Warehouses

Pacific Beach Communities of the Nineteenth Century

Author: Caroline Ralston

Publisher: University of Queensland Press

ISBN: 1921902310

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 1081

A pioneering study of early trade and beach communities in the Pacific Islands and first published in 1977, this book provides historians with an ambitious survey of early European-Polynesian contact, an analysis of how early trade developed along with the beachcomber community, and a detailed reconstruction of development of the early Pacific port towns. Set mainly in the first half of the 19th century, continuing in some cases for a few decades more, the book covers five ports: Kororareka (now Russell, in New Zealand), Levuka (Fiji), Apia (Samoa), Papeete (Tahiti) and Honolulu (Hawai'i). The role of beachcombers, the earliest European inhabitants, as well as the later consuls or commercial agents, and the development of plantation economies is explored. The book is a tour de force, the first detailed comparative academic study of these early precolonial trading towns and their race relations. It argues that the predominantly egalitarian towns where Islanders, beachcombers, traders, and missionaries mixed were largely harmonious, but this was undermined by later arrivals and larger populations.