The Ancient Hawaiian State

Origins of a Political Society

Author: Robert J. Hommon

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199916128

Category: History

Page: 322

View: 4336

Drawing on archaeological and ethnohistorical sources, this book redefines the study of primary states by arguing for the inclusion of Polynesia, which witnessed the development of primary states in both Hawaii and Tonga.

The View from the Masthead

Maritime Imagination and Antebellum American Sea Narratives

Author: Hester Blum

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469606550

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 6802

With long, solitary periods at sea, far from literary and cultural centers, sailors comprise a remarkable population of readers and writers. Although their contributions have been little recognized in literary history, seamen were important figures in the nineteenth-century American literary sphere. In the first book to explore their unique contribution to literary culture, Hester Blum examines the first-person narratives of working sailors, from little-known sea tales to more famous works by Herman Melville, James Fenimore Cooper, Edgar Allan Poe, and Richard Henry Dana. In their narratives, sailors wrote about how their working lives coexisted with--indeed, mutually drove--their imaginative lives. Even at leisure, they were always on the job site. Blum analyzes seamen's libraries, Barbary captivity narratives, naval memoirs, writings about the Galapagos Islands, Melville's sea vision, and the crisis of death and burial at sea. She argues that the extent of sailors' literacy and the range of their reading were unusual for a laboring class, belying the popular image of Jack Tar as merely a swaggering, profane, or marginal figure. As Blum demonstrates, seamen's narratives propose a method for aligning labor and contemplation that has broader applications for the study of American literature and history.

Nothing Too Daring

A Biography of Commodore David Porter, 1783-1843

Author: David Long

Publisher: Naval Institute Press

ISBN: 1612513190

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 5612

Commodore David Dixon Porter made history when he took the Essex into the Pacific and crippled the British whaling industry in the War of 1812. He was the first to suggest that the U.S. Navy force open Japan. He was also court-martialed and convicted on charges arising out of his unauthorized invasion of Spanish Puerto Rico. He later sought to reverse his fortunes in the Mexican Navy, and consistently suffered chaos in his personal and financial affairs. As the first U.S. chargé d’affaires in Constantinople he established direct diplomatic relations between the U.S. and the Ottoman Empire. Porter was courageous, passionate, intelligent, far-sighted, dedicated, and generous. Yet he was at the same time impulsive, avaricious, hot-tempered, conceited, sometimes vicious, and finally paranoiac. Nothing Too Daring offers an objective, thoroughly researched biography of one of America’s most colorful naval officers.

Every Man Will Do His Duty

An Anthology of Firsthand Accounts from the Age of Nelson 1793–1815

Author: Dean King,John B. Hattendorf

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1453238328

Category: History

Page: 444

View: 2962

Twenty-two enthralling stories of the Royal Navy, bringing to vivid life the greatest battles and daily struggles of seafaring in the Napoleonic era At the dawn of the nineteenth century, the British Navy was the mightiest instrument of war the world had ever known. The Royal Navy patrolled the seas from India to the Caribbean, connecting an empire with footholds in every corner of the earth. Such a massive Navy required the service of more than 100,000 men—from officers to deckhands to surgeons. These are their stories. The inspiration for the bestselling novels by Patrick O’Brian and C. S. Forester, these memoirs and diaries, edited by Dean King, provide a true portrait of life aboard British warships during one of the most significant eras of world history. Their tellers are officers and ordinary sailors, and their subjects range from barroom brawls to the legendary heroics of Lord Horatio Nelson himself. Though these “iron men on wooden ships” are long gone, their deeds echo through the centuries.

Sea of Glory

America's Voyage of Discovery, The U.S. Exploring Expedition, 1838-1842

Author: Nathaniel Philbrick

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781440649103

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 7631

"A treasure of a book."—David McCullough A New York Times Notable Book America's first frontier was not the West; it was the sea, and no one writes more eloquently about that watery wilderness than Nathaniel Philbrick. In his bestselling In the Heart of the Sea Philbrick probed the nightmarish dangers of the vast Pacific. Now, in an epic sea adventure, he writes about one of the most ambitious voyages of discovery the Western world has ever seen—the U.S. Exploring Expedition of 1838–1842. On a scale that dwarfed the journey of Lewis and Clark, six magnificent sailing vessels and a crew of hundreds set out to map the entire Pacific Ocean and ended up naming the newly discovered continent of Antarctica, collecting what would become the basis of the Smithsonian Institution. Combining spellbinding human drama and meticulous research, Philbrick reconstructs the dark saga of the voyage to show why, instead of being celebrated and revered as that of Lewis and Clark, it has—until now—been relegated to a footnote in the national memory. Winner of the Theodore and Franklin D. Roosevelt Naval History Prize

Through a Glass Darkly

Reflections on Personal Identity in Early America

Author: Ronald Hoffman,Mechal Sobel,Fredrika J. Teute

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9780807846445

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 3927

These thirteen original essays are provocative explorations in the construction and representation of self in America's colonial and early republican eras. Highlighting the increasing importance of interdisciplinary research for the field of early America

True Yankees

The South Seas and the Discovery of American Identity

Author: Dane A. Morrison

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421415437

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 6017

With American independence came the freedom to sail anywhere in the world under a new flag. During the years between the Treaty of Paris and the Treaty of Wangxi, Americans first voyaged past the Cape of Good Hope, reaching the ports of Algiers and the bazaars of Arabia, the markets of India and the beaches of Sumatra, the villages of Cochin, China, and the factories of Canton. Their South Seas voyages of commerce and discovery introduced the infant nation to the world and the world to what the Chinese, Turks, and others dubbed the "new people." Drawing on private journals, letters, ships’ logs, memoirs, and newspaper accounts, True Yankees traces America’s earliest encounters on a global stage through the exhilarating experiences of five Yankee seafarers. Merchant Samuel Shaw spent a decade scouring the marts of China and India for goods that would captivate the imaginations of his countrymen. Mariner Amasa Delano toured much of the Pacific hunting seals. Explorer Edmund Fanning circumnavigated the globe, touching at various Pacific and Indian Ocean ports of call. In 1829, twenty-year-old Harriett Low reluctantly accompanied her merchant uncle and ailing aunt to Macao, where she recorded trenchant observations of expatriate life. And sea captain Robert Bennet Forbes’s last sojourn in Canton coincided with the eruption of the First Opium War. How did these bold voyagers approach and do business with the people in the region, whose physical appearance, practices, and culture seemed so strange? And how did native men and women—not to mention the European traders who were in direct competition with the Americans—regard these upstarts who had fought off British rule? The accounts of these adventurous travelers reveal how they and hundreds of other mariners and expatriates influenced the ways in which Americans defined themselves, thereby creating a genuinely brash national character—the "true Yankee." Readers who love history and stories of exploration on the high seas will devour this gripping tale. -- Eric Jay Dolan

Grass Huts and Warehouses

Pacific Beach Communities of the Nineteenth Century

Author: Caroline Ralston

Publisher: University of Queensland Press

ISBN: 1921902310

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 5024

A pioneering study of early trade and beach communities in the Pacific Islands and first published in 1977, this book provides historians with an ambitious survey of early European-Polynesian contact, an analysis of how early trade developed along with the beachcomber community, and a detailed reconstruction of development of the early Pacific port towns. Set mainly in the first half of the 19th century, continuing in some cases for a few decades more, the book covers five ports: Kororareka (now Russell, in New Zealand), Levuka (Fiji), Apia (Samoa), Papeete (Tahiti) and Honolulu (Hawai'i). The role of beachcombers, the earliest European inhabitants, as well as the later consuls or commercial agents, and the development of plantation economies is explored. The book is a tour de force, the first detailed comparative academic study of these early precolonial trading towns and their race relations. It argues that the predominantly egalitarian towns where Islanders, beachcombers, traders, and missionaries mixed were largely harmonious, but this was undermined by later arrivals and larger populations.

Ships of Oak, Guns of Iron

The War of 1812 and the Forging of the American Navy

Author: Ronald Utt

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1621570088

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 611

The War of 1812 is typically noted for a handful of events: the burning of the White House, the rise of the Star Spangled Banner, and the battle of New Orleans. But in fact the greatest consequence of that distant conflict was the birth of the U.S. Navy. During the War of 1812, America’s tiny fleet took on the mightiest naval power on earth, besting the British in a string of victories that stunned both nations. In his new book, Ships of Oak and Guns of Iron: The War of 1812 and the Birth of the American Navy, author Dr. Ronald Utt not only sheds new light on the naval battles of the War of 1812 and how they gave birth to our nation’s great navy, but tells the story of the War of 1812 through the portraits of famous American war heroes. From the cunning Stephen Decatur to the fierce David Porter, Ships of Oak and Guns of Iron relates how thousands of American men and boys gave better than they got against the British Navy. The great age of fighting sail is as rich in heroic drama as any epoch. Dr. Utt’s Ships of Oak and Guns of Iron retrieves the American chapter of that epoch from unjustified obscurity, and offers readers an intriguing chronicle of the War of 1812 as well as a unique perspective on the birth of the U.S. Navy.

The Galapagos Affair

Author: John E Treherne

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1446467880

Category: Travel

Page: 256

View: 9612

Over half-a-century ago fanciful and exotic stories began to appear in the world's press about settlers on the remote Galapagos island of Floreana. The tales were of nudism, free love communes, stainless steel dentures - a latter-day Garden of Eden. But the truth was even stranger. Friedrich Ritter, an eccentric German intellectual, and his long-suffering companion Dora Strauch, were the first arrivals. Once established, they were soon joined by others. Most bizarre and dangerous was the self-styled Baroness Wagner-Bosquet. She ruled her three young male lovers with a riding crop, a pearl-handled revolver and insatiable sexual demands - terrorising other settlers. Her mysterious disappearance and the discovery of unidentified bodies on a nearby island perplexed the world. Now The Galapagos Affair unravels the whole incredible story.

The Essex and the Whale: Melville's Leviathan Library and the Birth of Moby-Dick

Melville’s Leviathan Library and the Birth of Moby-Dick

Author: R. D. Madison

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440850089

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 275

View: 9142

This fascinating anthology introduces readers to the literary side of Herman Melville's whaling world with an unprecedented collection of the original whaling texts from which Melville drew to create his masterpiece, Moby-Dick. • Offers the full text of Owen Chase's Narrative of the Most Extraordinary and Distressing Shipwreck of the Whale-ship Essex and lengthy excerpts from the texts of Melville's other whaling books, gathered in one handy compendium • Presents an introduction and primary source selection by internationally known Melville scholar R. D. Madison (associate general editor of the Northwestern-Newberry Edition of the Writings of Herman Melville) • Provides readers with a stand-alone coherent picture of whaling lore and the response to the Essex disaster in Melville's time through the selection of primary sources