Joseph Conrad and the Fiction of Autobiography

Author: Edward W. Said

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231140058

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 219

View: 5551

Edward W. Said locates Joseph Conrad's fear of personal disintegration in his constant re-narration of the past. Using the author's personal letters as a guide to understanding his fiction, Said draws an important parallel between Conrad's view of his own life and the manner and form of his stories. The critic also argues that the author, who set his fiction in exotic locations like East Asia and Africa, projects political dimensions in his work that mirror a colonialist preoccupation with "civilizing" native peoples. Said then suggests that this dimension should be considered when reading all of Western literature. First published in 1966, Said's critique of the Western self's struggle with modernity signaled the beginnings of his groundbreaking work, Orientalism, and remains a cornerstone of postcolonial studies today.

Joseph Conrad

A Biography

Author: Jeffrey Meyers

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 081541112X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 428

View: 390

Celebrated biographer, Jeffrey Meyers recounts the contradictory, tormented life of Joseph Conrad.

Music at the Limits

Author: Edward W. Said

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231139366

Category: Music

Page: 325

View: 5194

Music at the Limits is the first book to bring together three decades of Edward W. Said's essays and articles on music. Addressing the work of a variety of composers, musicians, and performers, Said carefully draws out music's social, political, and cultural contexts and, as a classically trained pianist, provides rich and often surprising assessments of classical music and opera. Said saw music as a reflection of his ideas on literature and history and paid close attention to its composition and creative possibilities. Eloquent and surprising, Music at the Limits preserves an important dimension of Said's brilliant intellectual work and cements his reputation as one of the most influential and groundbreaking scholars of the twentieth century.

The Mirror of the Sea

Author: Joseph Conrad

Publisher: The Floating Press

ISBN: 1775450880

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 214

View: 6733

Although Joseph Conrad achieved acclaim as one of the masters of English-language fiction, his own life story is as fascinating and engaging as Heart of Darkness or Lord Jim. The volume The Mirror of the Sea is a collection of several autobiographical sketches, remembrances and essays that Conrad originally published in a number of European magazines.

Edward Said and the Religious Effects of Culture

Author: William D. Hart

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521778107

Category: Religion

Page: 236

View: 4729

This book provides a distinctive account of Edward Said's critique of modern culture by highlighting the religion-secularism distinction on which it is predicated. It refers to religious and secular traditions and to tropes that extend the meaning and reference of religion and secularism in indeterminate ways. It covers Said's heterogeneous corpus--from Joseph Conrad and the Fiction of Autobiography, his first book, to Orientalism, his most influential book, to his recent writings on the Palestinian question. The religion-secularism distinction lies behind Said's cultural criticism, and his notion of intellectual responsibility.

Conrad in the Nineteenth Century

Author: Ian Watt

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520044050

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 375

View: 439

New scholarship concerning the life of the British novelist augments a critical study of Conrad's early literary development that examines his work in light of nineteenth-century social ethics and such movements as Romanticism and Symbolism

The Dawn Watch

Joseph Conrad and the Globalizing World

Author: Maya Jasanoff

Publisher: William Collins

ISBN: 9780007553730

Category:

Page: 400

View: 8431

A visionary exploration of the life and times of Joseph Conrad, his turbulent age of globalization and our own, from one of the most exciting young historians writing today. 'Enlightening, compassionate, superb' John le Carr� Migration, terrorism, the tensions between global capitalism and nationalism, the promise and peril of a technological and communications revolution: these forces shaped the life and work of Joseph Conrad at the dawn of the twentieth century. In this brilliant new interpretation of one of the great voices in modern literature, Maya Jasanoff reveals Conrad as a prophet of globalization as we recognize it today. As an immigrant from Poland to England, and in travels from Malaysia to the Congo to the Caribbean, Conrad navigated an interconnected world, and captured it in a literary oeuvre of extraordinary depth. His life story delivers a history of globalization from the inside out, and reflects powerfully on the aspirations and challenges of the modern world. Joseph Conrad was born Jozef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski in 1857, to Polish parents in the Russian Empire. At sixteen he left the landlocked heart of Europe to become a sailor, and for the next twenty years travelled the world's oceans before settling permanently in London as an author. He saw the surging, competitive 'new imperialism' that planted a flag in almost every populated part of the globe. He got a close look, too, at the places 'beyond the end of telegraph cables and mail-boat lines,' and the hypocrisy of the west's most cherished ideals. In a compelling blend of history, biography and travelogue, Maya Jasanoff follows Conrad's routes and the stories of his four greatest works: The Secret Agent, Lord Jim, Heart of Darkness, and Nostromo. Genre-bending, intellectually thrilling and deeply humane, The Dawn Watch embarks on a spellbinding expedition into the dark heart of Conrad's world - and through it to our own.

Populating the Novel

Literary Form and the Politics of Surplus Life

Author: Emily Steinlight

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 1501710729

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 292

View: 6416

From the teeming streets of Dickens’s London to the households of domestic fiction, nineteenth-century British writers constructed worlds crammed beyond capacity with human life. In Populating the Novel, Emily Steinlight contends that rather than simply reflecting demographic growth, such pervasive literary crowding contributed to a seismic shift in British political thought. She shows how the nineteenth-century novel in particular claimed a new cultural role as it took on the task of narrating human aggregation at a moment when the Malthusian specter of surplus population suddenly and quite unexpectedly became a central premise of modern politics. In readings of novels by Mary Shelley, Elizabeth Gaskell, Charles Dickens, Mary Braddon, Thomas Hardy, and Joseph Conrad that link fiction and biopolitics, Steinlight brings the crowds that pervade nineteenth-century fiction into the foreground. In so doing, she transforms the subject and political stakes of the Victorian novel, dislodging the longstanding idea that its central category is the individual by demonstrating how fiction is altered by its emerging concern with population. By overpopulating narrative space and imagining the human species perpetually in excess of the existing social order, she shows, fiction made it necessary to radically reimagine life in the aggregate.

Edward Said

Criticism and Society

Author: Abdirahman A. Hussein

Publisher: Verso

ISBN: 9781859843901

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 339

View: 5528

The only intellectual biography of the groundbreaking author of Orientalism, published on the first anniversary of Said's death.

Five Autobiographies and a Fiction

Author: Lucius Shepard

Publisher: Subterranean

ISBN: 9781596065550

Category: Fiction

Page: 368

View: 2925

Five Autobiographies and a Fiction, the long-awaited new collection from master storyteller Lucius Shepard, is a significant publishing event, a volume equal in every way to such earlier Shepard classics as The Jaguar Hunter and The Dragon Griaule. Its six long stories offer narrative pleasures as diverse and profound as anything to be found in modern imaginative fiction. "Ditch Witch," set in rural Oregon, concerns a young man on the run in a stolen car, a hitchhiker who may or may not have witch-like powers, and the bizarre inhabitants of the seemingly innocuous Elfland Motel. "The Flock" is a tale of high school football and small town malaise set against an impossible intrusion from the natural world. A washed-up actor and a Malaysian "woman of power" stand at the center of "Vacancy," the account of a man forced to confront the very real demons of his past. "Dog-eared Paperback of My Life" follows a writer (Thomas Cradle) on his erotically charged journey down the Mekong River, a

The Rings of Saturn

Author: W. G. Sebald

Publisher: New Directions Publishing

ISBN: 081122130X

Category: Fiction

Page: 304

View: 3253

"The book is like a dream you want to last forever" (Roberta Silman, The New York Times Book Review), now with a gorgeous new cover by the famed designer Peter Mendelsund The Rings of Saturn—with its curious archive of photographs—records a walking tour of the eastern coast of England. A few of the things which cross the path and mind of its narrator (who both is and is not Sebald) are lonely eccentrics, Sir Thomas Browne’s skull, a matchstick model of the Temple of Jerusalem, recession-hit seaside towns, wooded hills, Joseph Conrad, Rembrandt’s "Anatomy Lesson," the natural history of the herring, the massive bombings of WWII, the dowager Empress Tzu Hsi, and the silk industry in Norwich. W.G. Sebald’s The Emigrants (New Directions, 1996) was hailed by Susan Sontag as an "astonishing masterpiece perfect while being unlike any book one has ever read." It was "one of the great books of the last few years," noted Michael Ondaatje, who now acclaims The Rings of Saturn "an even more inventive work than its predecessor, The Emigrants."

Joseph Conrad

A Life

Author: Zdzisław Najder

Publisher: Camden House

ISBN: 9781571133472

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 745

View: 2159

Up-to-date and extensive revision of Najder's much-acclaimed scholarly biography of Conrad, employing newly accessible sources.

Edward Said's Rhetoric of the Secular

Author: Mathieu E. Courville

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1441115951

Category: Religion

Page: 256

View: 8512

Edward Said's Rhetoric of the Secular provides an important new reading of Edward W. Said's work, emphasizing not only the distinction but also the fuzzy borders between representations of ‘the religious' and ‘the secular' found within and throughout his oeuvre and at the core of some of his most customary rhetorical strategies. Mathieu Courville begins by examining Said's own reflections on his life, before moving on to key debates about Said's work within Religious Studies and Middle Eastern Studies, and his relationship to French critical theorists. Through close attention to Said's use of the literal and the figurative when dealing with religious, national and cultural matters, Courville discerns a pattern that illuminates what Said means by secular. Said's work shows that the secular is not the utter opposite of religion in the modern globalized world, but may exist in a productive tension with it.

Sexuality and the Erotic in the Fiction of Joseph Conrad

Author: Jeremy Hawthorn

Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 190

View: 3397

Awarded third place for The Adam Gillon Book Award in Conrad Studies 2009 The book presents a sustained critique of the interlinked (and contradictory) views that the fiction of Joseph Conrad is largely innocent of any interest in or concern with sexuality and the erotic, and that when Conrad does attempt to depict sexual desire or erotic excitement then this results in bad writing. Jeremy Hawthorn argues for a revision of the view that Conrad lacks understanding of and interest in sexuality. He argues that the comprehensiveness of Conrad's vision does not exclude a concern with the sexual and the erotic, and that this concern is not with the sexual and the erotic as separate spheres of human life, but as elements dialectically related to those matters public and political that have always been recognized as central to Conrad's fictional achievement. The book will open Conrad's fiction to readings enriched by the insights of critics and theorists associated with Gender Studies and Post-colonialism.

Globalizing Education, Educating the Local

How Method Made us Mad

Author: Ian Stronach

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135179565

Category: Education

Page: 240

View: 985

This book offers a critical and deconstructive account of global discourses on education, arguing that these overblown ‘hypernarratives’ are neither economically, technically nor philosophically defensible. Nor even sane. Their ‘mythic economic instrumentalism’ mimic rather than meet the economic needs of global capitalism in ways that the Crash of 2008 brings into vivid disarray. They reduce national education to the same ‘hollowed out’ state as national capitalisms, subject to global pseudo-accountancy and fads. The book calls for a philosophical and methodological revolution, arguing for more transformative narratives that remodel qualitative inquiry, particularly in addressing a more performative rather than representative ideal. The first part of the book aims to critique, deconstruct and satirise contemporary assumptions about educational achievement and outputs, the nature of contemporary educational discourses, and the nature of the professionalism that sustain them. The second part offers innovative postmodernist ways of reconstructing a theory and methodology that aims at ‘educating the local’ rather than succumbing to the fantasies of the universal. This is a very timely book in that the economic crisis re-exposes the mythic nature of education-economic linkages, putting discourses prefaced on such ‘connections’ into parallel crisis. Our global educational discourses have also crashed, and new futures need urgently to be found. Such a ‘turnaround’ is both proposed and argued for. The book will appeal to a wide range of readers who are committed to educational and cultural change, and who are interested in a new politics of education. It will have an immediate relevance and appeal in the UK, USA, Australia and New Zealand in particular.

Archives of Authority

Empire, Culture, and the Cold War

Author: Andrew N. Rubin

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400842174

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 200

View: 826

Combining literary, cultural, and political history, and based on extensive archival research, including previously unseen FBI and CIA documents, Archives of Authority argues that cultural politics--specifically America's often covert patronage of the arts--played a highly important role in the transfer of imperial authority from Britain to the United States during a critical period after World War II. Andrew Rubin argues that this transfer reshaped the postwar literary space and he shows how, during this time, new and efficient modes of cultural transmission, replication, and travel--such as radio and rapidly and globally circulated journals--completely transformed the position occupied by the postwar writer and the role of world literature. Rubin demonstrates that the nearly instantaneous translation of texts by George Orwell, Thomas Mann, W. H. Auden, Richard Wright, Mary McCarthy, and Albert Camus, among others, into interrelated journals that were sponsored by organizations such as the CIA's Congress for Cultural Freedom and circulated around the world effectively reshaped writers, critics, and intellectuals into easily recognizable, transnational figures. Their work formed a new canon of world literature that was celebrated in the United States and supposedly represented the best of contemporary thought, while less politically attractive authors were ignored or even demonized. This championing and demonizing of writers occurred in the name of anti-Communism--the new, transatlantic "civilizing mission" through which postwar cultural and literary authority emerged.

Joseph Conrad

A Personal Remembrance

Author: Ford Madox Ford

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108060943

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 4972

Determined not to write a biography about his friend Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) in the usual dry style, Ford Madox Ford (1873-1939) instead produced a novel. As a result, some biographical facts are given less emphasis than others, in particular the acrimony which later blighted relations between the two men. But the work is distinguished by its liveliness and by a wealth of vivid detail. Ford describes Conrad's remarkably long-eared horse, his haphazard use of adverbs and their fraught collaboration over their second joint novel, Romance, during which Ford's carefully unexciting style provoked the adventure-loving Conrad to depression. Ford's impressionistic portrayal of Conrad as an elegant, likeable swindler and 'beautiful genius' strikes a far richer chord than a purely historical account. First published in 1924, just after Conrad's death, this work remains a striking example of creative non-fiction, instructive for scholars and students of English literature.