Jewish Philosophy as a Guide to Life

Rosenzweig, Buber, Levinas, Wittgenstein

Author: Hilary Putnam

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253009642

Category: Religion

Page: 136

View: 2427

Distinguished philosopher Hilary Putnam, who is also a practicing Jew, questions the thought of three major Jewish philosophers of the 20th century—Franz Rosenzweig, Martin Buber, and Emmanuel Levinas—to help him reconcile the philosophical and religious sides of his life. An additional presence in the book is Ludwig Wittgenstein, who, although not a practicing Jew, thought about religion in ways that Putnam juxtaposes to the views of Rosenzweig, Buber, and Levinas. Putnam explains the leading ideas of each of these great thinkers, bringing out what, in his opinion, constitutes the decisive intellectual and spiritual contributions of each of them. Although the religion discussed is Judaism, the depth and originality of these philosophers, as incisively interpreted by Putnam, make their thought nothing less than a guide to life.

A Guide to Jewish Religious Practice

Author: Isaac Klein

Publisher: KTAV Publishing House, Inc.

ISBN: 9780873340045

Category: Religion

Page: 588

View: 2733

An extensive treatment of the laws determining customary Jewish practices is presented in light of religious sources and the Conservative movement and concerns such areas as marriage, holidays and observations, and dietary restrictions

Gateway to Judaism

The What, how and why of Jewish Life

Author: Mordechai Becher

Publisher: Mesorah Publications

ISBN: 9781422600306

Category: Religion

Page: 518

View: 1233

Gateway to Judaism is an insider's engaging look at the mindset, values, and practices of Judaism in the 21st Century.

Rosenzweig and Heidegger

Between Judaism and German Philosophy

Author: Peter Eli Gordon

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520246365

Category: History

Page: 357

View: 936

"With brilliance and considerable daring, Peter Gordon's Rosenzweig and Heidegger broaches the possibility of a shared horizon and a promising dialogue between these two seminal figures—these antipodes—of twentieth-century thought. It will be the bench mark for future work in the field."—Thomas Sheehan, author of Heidegger: The Man and the Thinker "In this brilliant book, Peter Gordon sheds light on Rosenzweig's most important philosophical book, The Star of Redemption, by means of an unexpected (and sure to be controversial) comparison—with the philosophy of Heidegger's Being and Time. The result is a "must read" for anyone with a serious interest in either thinker."—Hilary Putnam, author of The Collapse of the Fact/Value Dichotomy and Other Essays "A major work. Gordon persuasively argues that the true originality of Rosenzweig's achievement, heretofore associated with a distinctively "Jewish" break with his German philosophical milieu, only becomes intelligible from within that very milieu. Focusing on resemblances between Rosenzweig's and Heidegger's projects, Gordon discerns the contours of a post-Nietzschean religious sensibility condensed into the paradox of a "redemption-in-the-world." This book will be valued by readers of both Heidegger and Rosenzweig, and by anyone interested in the intersections of philosophy and religion."—Eric L. Santner, author of On the Psychotheology of Everyday Life: Reflections on Freud and Rosenzweig "A comparative reading of Rosenzweig's Star of Redemption and Heidegger's Being and Time. Peter Eli Gordon has written a work of exemplary erudition, analytical nuance, philosophical acumen and expository grace."—Paul Mendes-Flohr, author of German Jews: A Dual Identity

Jewish Philosophy in the Middle Ages

Author: Raphael Jospe

Publisher: Academic Studies PRess

ISBN: 1934843091

Category: Philosophy

Page: 605

View: 9026

In a lecture title “Jewish Philosophy: An Obituary,” Paul Mendes-Flohr observed that “Jewish philosophers seem to be a dying breed.” However tongue in cheek the statement may have been at the close of the twentieth century by a scholar of modern Jewish thought, a similar pessimistic observation was made quite seriously at the beginning of the twentieth century by Isaac Husik in his History of Medieval Jewish Philosophy (1916), which he sadly concludes with the words, “There are Jews now and there are philosophers, but there are no Jewish philosophers and there is no Jewish philosophy.”This volume, as one more modest contribution to the exponentially increasing publications, in Hebrew and in other languages, of original thought and of scholarly analysis, proves that obituaries for Jewish philosophy and thought are exaggerated, premature, and ultimately far off the mark. Husik’s own work helped start the revival of a field for which he – like nineteenth century scholars of Wissenschaft des Judentums – mistakenly thought he was writing an epitaph.

The Essential Guide to Jewish Prayer and Practices

Author: Andrea Lieber, Ph.D.

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101577207

Category: Religion

Page: 336

View: 4673

An insightful and illuminating guide to Judaism's basic tenets and practices. The Essential Guide to Jewish Prayer and Practices offers a more profound understanding of Judaism - for practicing Jews and non-Jews alike - by explaining the key concepts of Jewish thought, including the sanctity of human life, Judaism's concept of God, and the role of theTorah in guiding Jewish spiritual life. Judaic studies scholar Andrea Lieber introduces readers to the form of Jewish prayer - the structure of Jewish worship and the different kinds of prayers that make up Jewish liturgy.The perfect guide for Jewish spirituality for affiliated and non-practicing Jews as well as people of other faiths. - Provides essential knowledge of the meaning of the Torah and the rituals of worship and prayer

God of Love

A Guide to the Heart of Judaism, Christianity and Islam

Author: Mirabai Starr

Publisher: Monkfish Book Publishing

ISBN: 0983358958

Category: Religion

Page: 240

View: 2869

God of Love is Mirabai Starr’s passionate and personal exploration of the interconnected wisdom of the three Abrahamic faiths. She shares an overview of essential teachings, stories of saints and spiritual masters, prophetic calls for peace and justice, and for the first time in print, deeply engaging narratives from her own spiritual experiences. She guides readers to recognize the teachings and practices that unify rather then divide the three religions, and sheds light on the interspiritual perspective, which celebrates the Divine in all paths. It is Mirabai’s hope that this book will serve as a reminder that a dedication to lovingkindness is the highest expression of faith for all three religions. EARLY REVIEWS FOR God of Love “Mirabai Starr takes us out dancing with the One. God of Love is a confluence of the currents of Judaism, Islam and Christianity all emptying into the great ocean of Love.” —Ram Dass, Author Be Here Now “In a time of division between people, this book — which is a masterful blend of research, storytelling, poetry, and memoir — is like a sacred magnet, pulling on the spiritual heart of all seekers.” —Elizabeth Lesser, Cofounder, Omega Institute; Author, Broken Open: How Difficult Times Can Help Us Grow “Mirabai Starr writes of the divine from a luminous gene inherited by only a few. We hear The True Song in each word she attributes to the holy. It is more than just her song; it is the Melody of the Spheres translated by an astute musician. We are always touched by the genuine in her call to the reader to love and love well, to see with the sacred eye of beauty.” -Ondrea & Stephen Levine, Authors Embracing the Beloved "Mirabai's book has brought me great consolation." -Daniel Berrigan, S. J. activist-priest; Author, No Gods but One “This book brilliantly reminds us that in the heart of the Abrahamic traditions there burns a singular divine flame.” -Rev. Robert V. Thompson, Author A Voluptuous God “A wonderful and ‘perfect’ book. Highly recommended.” -Rabbi David A. Cooper, Author God Is a Verb “[God of Love] will expand your vision and inspire your search; I recommend it with great joy.” -Andrew Harvey, Author The Hope: A Guide to Sacred Activism “At home in the three great Abrahamic traditions, Mirabai Starr takes us on a deeply personal journey 'Toward the One,' exploring aspects of the 'God of Love' as seen through the eyes of Jewish, Christian and Muslim mystics. This is a book which will delight the seeker of sacred connections between these traditions and those who look forward to a day when Jerusalem, the city shared by all these faiths, will be a house of prayer for all people." -Reb Netanel Miles-Yepez, Co-Author A Heart Afire: Stories and Teachings of the Early Hasidic Masters

The Thinking Jewish Teenager's Guide to Life

Author: Akiva Tatz

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781568711751

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 211

View: 4415

This book powerfully explains some of the deepest concepts in Judaism, demonstrating how those ideas and principles can, and should, guide decisions, relationships and growth to real maturity. There's no 'talking down' here; there's just straight inspiration, depth, and many answers.

Maimonides

Life and Thought

Author: Moshe Halbertal

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400848474

Category: Religion

Page: 400

View: 5666

Maimonides was the greatest Jewish philosopher and legal scholar of the medieval period, a towering figure who has had a profound and lasting influence on Jewish law, philosophy, and religious consciousness. This book provides a comprehensive and accessible introduction to his life and work, revealing how his philosophical sensibility and outlook informed his interpretation of Jewish tradition. Moshe Halbertal vividly describes Maimonides's childhood in Muslim Spain, his family's flight to North Africa to escape persecution, and their eventual resettling in Egypt. He draws on Maimonides's letters and the testimonies of his contemporaries, both Muslims and Jews, to offer new insights into his personality and the circumstances that shaped his thinking. Halbertal then turns to Maimonides's legal and philosophical work, analyzing his three great books--Commentary on the Mishnah, the Mishneh Torah, and the Guide of the Perplexed. He discusses Maimonides's battle against all attempts to personify God, his conviction that God's presence in the world is mediated through the natural order rather than through miracles, and his locating of philosophy and science at the summit of the religious life of Torah. Halbertal examines Maimonides's philosophical positions on fundamental questions such as the nature and limits of religious language, creation and nature, prophecy, providence, the problem of evil, and the meaning of the commandments. A stunning achievement, Maimonides offers an unparalleled look at the life and thought of this important Jewish philosopher, scholar, and theologian.

How Judaism Became a Religion

An Introduction to Modern Jewish Thought

Author: Leora Batnitzky

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400839711

Category: Religion

Page: 208

View: 1654

Is Judaism a religion, a culture, a nationality--or a mixture of all of these? In How Judaism Became a Religion, Leora Batnitzky boldly argues that this question more than any other has driven modern Jewish thought since the eighteenth century. This wide-ranging and lucid introduction tells the story of how Judaism came to be defined as a religion in the modern period--and why Jewish thinkers have fought as well as championed this idea. Ever since the Enlightenment, Jewish thinkers have debated whether and how Judaism--largely a religion of practice and public adherence to law--can fit into a modern, Protestant conception of religion as an individual and private matter of belief or faith. Batnitzky makes the novel argument that it is this clash between the modern category of religion and Judaism that is responsible for much of the creative tension in modern Jewish thought. Tracing how the idea of Jewish religion has been defended and resisted from the eighteenth century to today, the book discusses many of the major Jewish thinkers of the past three centuries, including Moses Mendelssohn, Abraham Geiger, Hermann Cohen, Martin Buber, Zvi Yehuda Kook, Theodor Herzl, and Mordecai Kaplan. At the same time, it tells the story of modern orthodoxy, the German-Jewish renaissance, Jewish religion after the Holocaust, the emergence of the Jewish individual, the birth of Jewish nationalism, and Jewish religion in America. More than an introduction, How Judaism Became a Religion presents a compelling new perspective on the history of modern Jewish thought.

Essential Judaism: Updated Edition

A Complete Guide to Beliefs, Customs & Rituals

Author: George Robinson

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501117750

Category: Religion

Page: 704

View: 8547

You’ll find everything you need to know about being Jewish in this indispensable, revised and updated guide to the religious traditions, everyday practices, philosophical beliefs, and historical foundations of Judaism. What happens at a synagogue service? What are the rules for keeping kosher? How do I light the Hanukah candles? What is in the Hebrew Bible? What do the Jewish holidays signify? What should I be teaching my children about being Jewish? With the first edition of Essential Judaism, George Robinson offered the world the accessible compendium that he sought when he rediscovered his Jewish identity as an adult. In his “ambitious and all-inclusive” (New York Times Book Review) guide, Robinson illuminates the Jewish life cycle at every stage and lays out many fascinating aspects of the religion—the Kabbalah and Jewish mysticism, the evolution of Hasidism, and much more—while keeping a firm focus on the different paths to living a good Jewish life in today’s world. Now, a decade and a half later, Robinson has updated this valuable introductory text with information on topics including denominational shifts, same-sex marriage, the intermarriage debate, transgender Jews, the growth of anti-Semitism, and the changing role of women in worship, along with many other hotly debated topics in the contemporary Jewish world and beyond. The perfect gift for a Bar/Bat Mitzvah or anyone thinking about conversion—this is the ultimate companion for anyone interested in learning more about Judaism, the kind of book its readers will revisit over and over for years to come.

On Jews and Judaism in Crisis

Selected Essays

Author: Gershom Scholem

Publisher: Paul Dry Books

ISBN: 1589880749

Category: Religion

Page: 306

View: 3867

Essays, letters, and articles written by the distinguished Jewish scholar over a fifty-year period. Includes three essays on Walter Benjamin.

Maimonides and the Book That Changed Judaism

Secrets of the Guide for the Perplexed

Author: Micah Goodman

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0827611986

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 274

View: 3255

A publishing sensation long at the top of the best-seller lists in Israel, the original Hebrew edition of Maimonides and the Book That Changed Judaism has been called the most successful book ever published in Israel on the preeminent medieval Jewish thinker Moses Maimonides. The works of Maimonides, particularly The Guide for the Perplexed, are reckoned among the fundamental texts that influenced all subsequent Jewish philosophy and also proved to be highly influential in Christian and Islamic thought. Spanning subjects ranging from God, prophecy, miracles, revelation, and evil, to politics, messianism, reason in religion, and the therapeutic role of doubt, Maimonides and the Book That Changed Judaism elucidates the complex ideas of The Guide in remarkably clear and engaging prose. Drawing on his own experience as a central figure in the current Israeli renaissance of Jewish culture and spirituality, Micah Goodman brings Maimonides’s masterwork into dialogue with the intellectual and spiritual worlds of twenty-first-century readers. Goodman contends that in Maimonides’s view, the Torah’s purpose is not to bring clarity about God but rather to make us realize that we do not understand God at all; not to resolve inscrutable religious issues but to give us insight into the true nature and purpose of our lives.

Thinking about the Torah

A Philosopher Reads the Bible

Author: Kenneth Seeskin

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0827613253

Category: Philosophy

Page: 216

View: 7896

The Bible is an enduring source of inspiration for the human heart and mind, and readers of Thinking about the Torah will be rewarded with an enhanced understanding of this great work’s deeper meanings. Drawing on Western philosophy and particularly Jewish philosophy, Kenneth Seeskin delves into ten core biblical verses and the powerful ideas that emerge from them. He speaks to readers on every page and invites conversation about topics central to human existence: how finite beings can relate to the infinite, what love is, the role of ethics in religion, and the meaning of holiness. Seeskin raises questions we all ask and responds to them with curiosity and compassion, weaving into his own perceptive commentary insights from great Jewish thinkers such as Maimonides, Spinoza, Buber, Rosenzweig, and Levinas, as well as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Luther, Kant, and Kierkegaard. The Bible is concerned with how we think as well as how we follow the commandments, rituals, and customs. Seeskin inspires us to read the Torah with an open mind and think about the lessons it teaches us.

Judaism as a Civilization

Toward a Reconstruction of American-Jewish Life

Author: Mordecai M. Kaplan

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0827609183

Category: Religion

Page: 601

View: 9080

In a book originally published in 1934, the author introduces a different way of looking at Judaism--as a changing religious civilization that requires new ideas in liturgy and ritual, the elimination of obsolete customs and an adjustment based on social, political and cultural conditions. Reprint.