Inventing the People: The Rise of Popular Sovereignty in England and America

Author: Edmund S. Morgan

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393347494

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 9050

"The best explanation that I have seen for our distinctive combination of faith, hope and naiveté concerning the governmental process." —Michael Kamman, Washington Post This book makes the provocative case here that America has remained politically stable because the Founding Fathers invented the idea of the American people and used it to impose a government on the new nation. His landmark analysis shows how the notion of popular sovereignty—the unexpected offspring of an older, equally fictional notion, the "divine right of kings"—has worked in our history and remains a political force today.

A Mighty Empire

The Origins of the American Revolution

Author: Marc Egnal

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801476587

Category: History

Page: 381

View: 3791

"This signal contribution to national history demonstrates that the political and economic experience of Americans during the Age of Revolution shaped their ideas and ideologies and gave form to their aspirations."—Douglas Greenberg, Rutgers University

John Wilkes

The Scandalous Father of Civil Liberty

Author: Arthur Cash

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300133097

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 496

View: 8773

One of the most colorful figures in English political history, John Wilkes (1726–97) is remembered as the father of the British free press, defender of civil and political liberties, and hero to American colonists, who attended closely to his outspoken endorsements of liberty. Wilkes’s political career was rancorous, involving duels, imprisonments in the Tower of London, and the Massacre of St. George’s Fields in which seven of his supporters were shot to death by government troops. He was equally famous for his “private” life—a confessed libertine, a member of the notorious Hellfire Club, and the author of what has been called the dirtiest poem in the English language. This lively biography draws a full portrait of John Wilkes from his childhood days through his heyday as a journalist and agitator, his defiance of government prosecutions for libel and obscenity, his fight against exclusion from Parliament, and his service as lord mayor of London on the eve of the American Revolution. Told here with the force and immediacy of a firsthand newspaper account, Wilkes’s own remarkable story is inseparable from the larger story of modern civil liberties and how they came to fruition.

A Judgment for Solomon

The D'Hauteville Case and Legal Experience in Antebellum America

Author: Michael Grossberg

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521557450

Category: History

Page: 270

View: 352

The story of the d'Hauteville case, a controversial child custody battle fought in 1840. It uses the story of one couple's bitter fight over their son to explore timebound and timeless features of American legal culture.

Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson

The Politics of Enlightenment and the American Founding

Author: Darren Staloff

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 080905356X

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 2196

The author compares the intellectual understanding of the Enlightenment of Alexander Hamilton, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson, and shows how the personal experiences and regional cultural traditions of each man shaped his interpretation of that movement and how those ideals played into the birth of the new nation.

Prologue to Revolution

Sources and Documents on the Stamp Act Crisis, 1764-1766

Author: Edmund S. Morgan

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807838918

Category: History

Page: 174

View: 5563

This comprehensive documentary source book on the Stamp Act provides a case-study approach to American colonial history and serves as a problems source book on the key event in Anglo-American relations in the 1760s. Morgan has assembled sixty-five crucial documents on all phases of the crisis; on certain acute issues of the controversy nearly all of the relevant materials now extant are included.

The Dred Scott Case

Its Significance in American Law and Politics

Author: Don Edward Fehrenbacher

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 741

View: 3085

Examines the legal bases of slavery and the long-term effects of the case on the American political, legal and judicial systems

The Lamp of Experience

Whig History and the Intellectual Origins of the American Revolution

Author: H. Trevor Colbourn

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780865971585

Category: History

Page: 305

View: 3376

In a landmark work, a leading scholar of the eighteenth century examines the ways in which an understanding of the nature of history influenced the thinking of the founding fathers. As Jack P. Greene has observed, "[The Whig] conception saw the past as a continual struggle between liberty and virtue on one hand and arbitrary power and corruption on the other." Many founders found in this intellectual tradition what Josiah Quincy, Jr., called the "true old English liberty," and it was this Whig tradition--this conception of liberty--that the champions of American independence and crafters of the new republic sought to perpetuate. Colbourn supports his thesis--that "Independence was in large measure the product of the historical concepts of the men who made it"--by documenting what books were read most widely by the founding generation. He also cites diaries, personal correspondence, newspapers, and legislative records. Trevor Colbourn is President Emeritus of the University of Central Florida. Please note: This title is available as an ebook for purchase on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and iTunes.

King and People in Provincial Massachusetts

Author: Richard L. Bushman

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9780807843987

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 3018

The American revolutionaries themselves believed the change from monarchy to republic was the essence of the Revolution. King and People in Provincial Massachusetts explores what monarchy meant to Massachusetts under its second charter and why the momentous change to republican government came about. Richard L. Bushman argues that monarchy entailed more than having a king as head of state: it was an elaborate political culture with implications for social organization as well. Massachusetts, moreover, was entirely loyal to the king and thoroughly imbued with that culture. Why then did the colonies become republican in 1776? The change cannot be attributed to a single thinker such as John Locke or to a strain of political thought such as English country party rhetoric. Instead, it was the result of tensions ingrained in the colonial political system that surfaced with the invasion of parliamentary power into colonial affairs after 1763. The underlying weakness of monarchical government in Massachusetts was the absence of monarchical society -- the intricate web of patronage and dependence that existed in England. But the conflict came from the colonists' conception of rulers as an alien class of exploiters whose interest was the plundering of the colonies. In large part, colonial politics was the effort to restrain official avarice. The author explicates the meaning of "interest" in political discourse to show how that conception was central in the thinking of both the popular party and the British ministry. Management of the interest of royal officials was a problem that continually bedeviled both the colonists and the crown. Conflict was perennial because the colonists and the ministry pursued diverging objectives in regulating colonial officialdom. Ultimately the colonists came to see that safety against exploitation by self-interested rulers would be assured only by republican government.

Democracy in Europe

Author: Larry Siedentop

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231123761

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 2033

Why do smokers claim that the first cigarette of the day is the best? What is the biological basis behind some heavy drinkers' belief that the "hair-of-the-dog" method alleviates the effects of a hangover? Why does marijuana seem to affect ones problem-solving capacity? Intoxicating Minds is, in the author's words, "a grand excavation of drug myth." Neither extolling nor condemning drug use, it is a story of scientific and artistic achievement, war and greed, empires and religions, and lessons for the future. Ciaran Regan looks at each class of drugs, describing the historical evolution of their use, explaining how they work within the brain's neurophysiology, and outlining the basic pharmacology of those substances. From a consideration of the effect of stimulants, such as caffeine and nicotine, and the reasons and consequences of their sudden popularity in the seventeenth century, the book moves to a discussion of more modern stimulants, such as cocaine and ecstasy. In addition, Regan explains how we process memory, the nature of thought disorders, and therapies for treating depression and schizophrenia. Regan then considers psychedelic drugs and their perceived mystical properties and traces the history of placebos to ancient civilizations. Finally, Intoxicating Minds considers the physical consequences of our co-evolution with drugs--how they have altered our very being--and offers a glimpse of the brave new world of drug therapies.

King and Congress

The Transfer of Political Legitimacy, 1774-1776

Author: Jerrilyn Greene Marston

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400858755

Category: History

Page: 478

View: 8878

A persuasive reassessment of the nature of the institution that was in the forefront of the American revolutionary struggle with Great Britain--the Continental Congress. Providing a completely new perspective on the history of the First and Second Continental Congresses before independence, the author argues that American expectations regarding the proper functions of a legitimate central government were formed under the British monarchy, and that these functions were primarily executive. Originally published in 1987. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Benjamin Franklin

Author: Edmund Sears Morgan

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300101621

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 339

View: 9350

Draws on Franklin's extensive writings to provide a portrait of the statesman, inventor, and Founding Father.

The Stamp Act Crisis

Prologue to Revolution

Author: Edmund S. Morgan,Helen M. Morgan

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807899798

Category: History

Page: 342

View: 8100

'Impressive! . . . The authors have given us a searching account of the crisis and provided some memorable portraits of officials in America impaled on the dilemma of having to enforce a measure which they themselves opposed.'--New York Times 'A brilliant contribution to the colonial field. Combining great industry, astute scholarship, and a vivid style, the authors have sought 'to recreate two years of American history.' They have succeeded admirably.'--William and Mary Quarterly 'Required reading for anyone interested in those eventful years preceding the American Revolution.'--Political Science Quarterly The Stamp Act, the first direct tax on the American colonies, provoked an immediate and violent response. The Stamp Act Crisis, originally published by UNC Press in 1953, identifies the issues that caused the confrontation and explores the ways in which the conflict was a prelude to the American Revolution.

The Old Revolutionaries

Author: Pauline Maier

Publisher: Knopf

ISBN: 0307828115

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 4051

The "old revolutionaries" were Samuel Adams, Isaac Sears, Thomas Young, Richard Henry Lee and Charels Carroll, five men who played significant roles in the American Revolution, and who are usually overlooked in history books today. Of widely varying backgrounds and interests, all of them had thir gratest influence in the years between 1769 and 1776 and all of them saw their power transferred after the war to the men we know as "the founding fathers." In telling the stories of these men, Pauline Maier shows how the American Revolution was less a collective movement than a committment to an ideal of a republic, which different people interpreted differently, and she describes "not just why Americans made the Revolution, but what the Revolution did to them."

The Limits of the Green Economy

From re-inventing capitalism to re-politicising the present

Author: Anneleen Kenis,Matthias Lievens

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317670213

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 170

View: 2614

Projecting win-win situations, new economic opportunities, green growth and innovative partnerships, the green economy discourse has quickly gained centre stage in international environmental governance and policymaking. Its underlying message is attractive and optimistic: if the market can become the tool for tackling climate change and other major ecological crises, the fight against these crises can also be the royal road to solving the problems of the market. But how ‘green’ is the green economy? And how social or democratic can it be? This book examines how the emergence of this new discourse has fundamentally modified the terms of the environmental debate. Interpreting the rise of green economy discourse as an attempt to re-invent capitalism, it unravels the different dimensions of the green economy and its limits: from pricing carbon to emissions trading, from sustainable consumption to technological innovation. The book uses the innovative concept of post-politics to provide a critical perspective on the way green economy discourse represents nature and society (and their interaction) and forecloses the imagination of alternative socio-ecological possibilities. As a way of repoliticising the debate, the book advocates the construction of new political faultlines based on the demands for climate justice and democratic commons. This book will be of interest to students and scholars of environmental politics, political ecology, human geography, human ecology, political theory, philosophy and political economy. Includes a foreword written by Erik Swyngedouw (Professor of Geography, Manchester University).

The Devil in the Shape of a Woman: Witchcraft in Colonial New England

Author: Carol F. Karlsen

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393347192

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 1635

"A pioneer work in…the sexual structuring of society. This is not just another book about witchcraft." —Edmund S. Morgan, Yale University Confessing to "familiarity with the devils," Mary Johnson, a servant, was executed by Connecticut officials in 1648. A wealthy Boston widow, Ann Hibbens was hanged in 1656 for casting spells on her neighbors. The case of Ann Cole, who was "taken with very strange Fits," fueled an outbreak of witchcraft accusations in Hartford a generation before the notorious events at Salem. More than three hundred years later, the question "Why?" still haunts us. Why were these and other women likely witches—vulnerable to accusations of witchcraft and possession? Carol F. Karlsen reveals the social construction of witchcraft in seventeenth-century New England and illuminates the larger contours of gender relations in that society.

Remaking the American Patient

How Madison Avenue and Modern Medicine Turned Patients into Consumers

Author: Nancy Tomes

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469622785

Category: Medical

Page: 560

View: 4649

In a work that spans the twentieth century, Nancy Tomes questions the popular--and largely unexamined--idea that in order to get good health care, people must learn to shop for it. Remaking the American Patient explores the consequences of the consumer economy and American medicine having come of age at exactly the same time. Tracing the robust development of advertising, marketing, and public relations within the medical profession and the vast realm we now think of as "health care," Tomes considers what it means to be a "good" patient. As she shows, this history of the coevolution of medicine and consumer culture tells us much about our current predicament over health care in the United States. Understanding where the shopping model came from, why it was so long resisted in medicine, and why it finally triumphed in the late twentieth century helps explain why, despite striking changes that seem to empower patients, so many Americans remain unhappy and confused about their status as patients today.