Inside the Nudge Unit

How small changes can make a big difference

Author: David Halpern

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 0753551381

Category: Psychology

Page: 400

View: 358

With a foreword by Richard Thaler, winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics 2017! Dr David Halpern, behavioural scientist and head of Number 10's Behavioural Insights Team, or the 'Nudge Unit', invites you inside the unconventional, multi-million pound saving initiative that makes a big difference through influencing small, simple changes in our behaviour. Using the application of psychology to the challenges we face in the world today, the Nudge Unit is pushing us in the right direction. This is their story.

Inside the Nudge Unit

How Small Changes Can Make a Big Difference

Author: David Halpern

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 0753556553

Category: Psychology

Page: 383

View: 5361

Every day we make countless decisions, from the small, mundane things to tackling life’s big questions, but we don’t always make the right choices. Behavioural scientist Dr David Halpern heads up Number 10’s ‘Nudge Unit’, the world’s first government institution that uses behavioural economics to examine and influence human behaviour, to ‘nudge’ us into making better decisions. Seemingly small and subtle solutions have led to huge improvements across tax, healthcare, pensions, employment, crime reduction, energy conservation and economic growth. Adding a crucial line to a tax reminder brought forward millions in extra revenue; refocusing the questions asked at the job centre helped an extra 10 per cent of people come off their benefits and back into work; prompting people to become organ donors while paying for their car tax added an extra 100,000 donors to the register in a single year. After two years and dozens of experiments in behavioural science, the results are undeniable. And now David Halpern and the Nudge Unit will help you to make better choices and improve your life.

Inside the Nudge Unit

How Small Changes Can Make a Big Difference

Author: David Halpern

Publisher: Virgin Books Limited

ISBN: 9780753556535

Category:

Page: 400

View: 7040

Every day we make countless decisions, from the small, mundane things to tackling lifeâe(tm)s big questions, but we donâe(tm)t always make the right choices. Behavioural scientist Dr David Halpern heads up Number 10âe(tm)s âe~Nudge Unitâe(tm), the worldâe(tm)s first government institution that uses behavioural economics to examine and influence human behaviour, to âe~nudgeâe(tm) us into making better decisions. Seemingly small and subtle solutions have led to huge improvements across tax, healthcare, pensions, employment, crime reduction, energy conservation and economic growth. Adding a crucial line to a tax reminder brought forward millions in extra revenue; refocusing the questions asked at the job centre helped an extra 10 per cent of people come off their benefits and back into work; prompting people to become organ donors while paying for their car tax added an extra 100,000 donors to the register in a single year. After two years and dozens of experiments in behavioural science, the results are undeniable. And now David Halpern and the Nudge Unit will help you to make better choices and improve your life.

Think Small

The Surprisingly Simple Ways to Reach Big Goals

Author: Owain Service,Rory Gallagher

Publisher: Michael O'Mara Books

ISBN: 1782436340

Category: Self-Help

Page: 227

View: 9946

'Governments around the world are using behavioural insights to help people achieve their goals. This great new book shows how you can use the same tools in your own life. Go nudge yourself!'- Richard Thaler, winner of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Economics A simple and accessible plan for success, based on seven scientifically tested steps that really work. We're often told to dream big, the sky's the limit and that nothing is impossible. While it is undoubtedly good advice to set yourself goals that have the potential to make you and those around you healthier and happier, how to reach those goals is often less clear. From getting fit or securing a new job to becoming a better manager or parent, simply setting your mind to something will rarely get you where you want to be, and big plans can quickly become overwhelming, leaving us feeling as though we've failed. Most of us set goals with very good intentions, so why do our best-laid plans so often go awry? When we're so committed to making positive changes and fulfilling our ambition at the outset, is there a way of avoiding the common roadblocks that stand between our goals and us? Thankfully, the answer is yes - and it's much easier to achieve than you might think. Working inside the world's first Nudge Unit, Owain Service and Rory Gallagher know the huge impact that small changes and clear plans, based on a scientific understanding of human behaviour, can have from an individual to an international level. For the first time, Think Smalltakes these successful approaches and translates them into an easy, simple framework that has the potential to make a big difference to all our lives.

The Hidden Wealth of Nations

Author: David Halpern

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0745656277

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 9852

Richer nations are happier, yet economic growth doesn't increase happiness. This paradox is explained by the Hidden Wealth of Nations - the extent to which citizens get along with other independently drives both economic growth and well-being. Much of this hidden wealth is expressed in everyday ways, such as our common values, the way we look after our children and elderly, or whether we trust and help strangers. It is a hidden dimension of inequality, and helps to explain why governments have found it so hard to reduce gaps in society. There are also deep cracks in this hidden wealth, in the form of our rising fears of crime, immigration and terror. Using a rich variety of international comparisons and new analysis, the book explores what is happening in contemporary societies from value change to the changing role of governments, and offers suggestions about what policymakers and citizens can do about it.

Nudge

Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness

Author: Richard H. Thaler,Cass R. Sunstein

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101655097

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 320

View: 5105

From the winner of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Economics, Richard H. Thaler, and Cass R. Sunstein: a revelatory look at how we make decisions—for fans of Malcolm Gladwell’s Blink and Daniel Kahneman’s Thinking Fast and Slow New York Times bestseller Named a Best Book of the Year by The Economist and the Financial Times Every day we make choices—about what to buy or eat, about financial investments or our children’s health and education, even about the causes we champion or the planet itself. Unfortunately, we often choose poorly. Nudge is about how we make these choices and how we can make better ones. Using dozens of eye-opening examples and drawing on decades of behavioral science research, Nobel Prize winner Richard H. Thaler and Harvard Law School professor Cass R. Sunstein show that no choice is ever presented to us in a neutral way, and that we are all susceptible to biases that can lead us to make bad decisions. But by knowing how people think, we can use sensible “choice architecture” to nudge people toward the best decisions for ourselves, our families, and our society, without restricting our freedom of choice. More than 750,000 copies sold

The Last Mile

Creating Social and Economic Value from Behavioral Insights

Author: Dilip Soman

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442616644

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 296

View: 380

Most organizations spend much of their effort on the start of the value creation process: namely, creating a strategy, developing new products or services, and analyzing the market. They pay a lot less attention to the end: the crucial “last mile” where consumers come to their website, store, or sales representatives and make a choice. In The Last Mile, Dilip Soman shows how to use insights from behavioral science in order to close that gap. Beginning with an introduction to the last mile problem and the concept of choice architecture, the book takes a deep dive into the psychology of choice, money, and time. It explains how to construct behavioral experiments and understand the data on preferences that they provide. Finally, it provides a range of practical tools with which to overcome common last mile difficulties. The Last Mile helps lay readers not only to understand behavioral science, but to apply its lessons to their own organizations’ last mile problems, whether they work in business, government, or the nonprofit sector. Appealing to anyone who was fascinated by Dan Ariely’s Predictably Irrational, Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein’s Nudge, or Daniel Kahneman’s Thinking, Fast and Slow but was not sure how those insights could be practically applied, The Last Mile is full of solid, concrete advice on how to put the lessons of behavioral science to work.

The Ethics of Influence

Government in the Age of Behavioral Science

Author: Cass R. Sunstein

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107140706

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 234

View: 7241

In The Ethics of Influence, Cass R. Sunstein investigates the ethical issues surrounding government nudges, choice architecture, and mandates.

Behavioural Public Policy

Author: Adam Oliver

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107042631

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 252

View: 4581

In this accessible collection, leading academic economists, psychologists and philosophers apply behavioural economic findings to practical policy concerns.

Nudge Theory in Action

Behavioral Design in Policy and Markets

Author: Sherzod Abdukadirov

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319313193

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 351

View: 2331

This collection challenges the popular but abstract concept of nudging, demonstrating the real-world application of behavioral economics in policy-making and technology. Groundbreaking and practical, it considers the existing political incentives and regulatory institutions that shape the environment in which behavioral policy-making occurs, as well as alternatives to government nudges already provided by the market. The contributions discuss the use of regulations and technology to help consumers overcome their behavioral biases and make better choices, considering the ethical questions of government and market nudges and the uncertainty inherent in designing effective nudges. Four case studies - on weight loss, energy efficiency, consumer finance, and health care - put the discussion of the efficiency of nudges into concrete, recognizable terms. A must-read for researchers studying the public policy applications of behavioral economics, this book will also appeal to practicing lawmakers and regulators.

Misbehaving: The Making of Behavioral Economics

Author: Richard H. Thaler

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393246779

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 336

View: 7769

Get ready to change the way you think about economics. Richard H. Thaler has spent his career studying the radical notion that the central agents in the economy are humans—predictable, error-prone individuals. Misbehaving is his arresting, frequently hilarious account of the struggle to bring an academic discipline back down to earth—and change the way we think about economics, ourselves, and our world. Traditional economics assumes rational actors. Early in his research, Thaler realized these Spock-like automatons were nothing like real people. Whether buying a clock radio, selling basketball tickets, or applying for a mortgage, we all succumb to biases and make decisions that deviate from the standards of rationality assumed by economists. In other words, we misbehave. More importantly, our misbehavior has serious consequences. Dismissed at first by economists as an amusing sideshow, the study of human miscalculations and their effects on markets now drives efforts to make better decisions in our lives, our businesses, and our governments. Coupling recent discoveries in human psychology with a practical understanding of incentives and market behavior, Thaler enlightens readers about how to make smarter decisions in an increasingly mystifying world. He reveals how behavioral economic analysis opens up new ways to look at everything from household finance to assigning faculty offices in a new building, to TV game shows, the NFL draft, and businesses like Uber. Laced with antic stories of Thaler’s spirited battles with the bastions of traditional economic thinking, Misbehaving is a singular look into profound human foibles. When economics meets psychology, the implications for individuals, managers, and policy makers are both profound and entertaining. Shortlisted for the Financial Times & McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award

Nudge, Nudge, Think, Think

Experimenting with Ways to Change Civic Behaviour

Author: Peter John,Sarah Cotterill,Liz Richardson,Alice Moseley,Gerry Stoker,Graham Smith,Corinne Wales,Hanhua Liu,Hisako Nomura

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1780935552

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 1137

How can governments persuade citizens to act in socially beneficial ways? This successor to Thaler and Sunstein's cult book Nudge argues that an alternative approach needs to be considered - a 'think' strategy, in which citizens deliberate their own priorities as part of a process of civic renewal.

Social Capital

Author: David Halpern

Publisher: Polity

ISBN: 0745625479

Category: Social Science

Page: 388

View: 8822

This work presents an introduction to the concept of social capital - a term which refers to the social networks, informal structures and norms that facilitate individual and collective action.

Nudging Health

Health Law and Behavioral Economics

Author: I. Glenn Cohen,Holly Fernandez Lynch

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421421011

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 392

View: 851

Behavioral nudges are everywhere: calorie counts on menus, automated text reminders to encourage medication adherence, a reminder bell when a driver’s seatbelt isn’t fastened. Designed to help people make better health choices, these reminders have become so commonplace that they often go unnoticed. In Nudging Health, forty-five experts in behavioral science and health policy from across academia, government, and private industry come together to explore whether and how these tools are effective in improving health outcomes. Behavioral science has swept the fields of economics and law through the study of nudges, cognitive biases, and decisional heuristics—but it has only recently begun to impact the conversation on health care. Nudging Health wrestles with some of the thorny philosophical issues, legal limits, and conceptual questions raised by behavioral science as applied to health law and policy. The volume frames the fundamental issues surrounding health nudges by addressing ethical questions. Does cost-sharing for health expenditures cause patients to make poor decisions? Is it right to make it difficult for people to opt out of having their organs harvested for donation when they die? Are behavioral nudges paternalistic? The contributors examine specific applications of behavioral science, including efforts to address health care costs, improve vaccination rates, and encourage better decision-making by physicians. They wrestle with questions regarding the doctor-patient relationship and defaults in healthcare while engaging with larger, timely questions of healthcare reform. Nudging Health is the first multi-voiced assessment of behavioral economics and health law to span such a wide array of issues—from the Affordable Care Act to prescription drugs. Contributors: David A. Asch, Jerry Avorn, Jennifer Blumenthal-Barby, Alexander M. Capron, Niteesh K. Choudhry, I. Glenn Cohen, Sarah Conly, Gregory Curfman, Khaled El Emam, Barbara J. Evans, Nir Eyal, Andrea Freeman, Alan M. Garber, Jonathan Gingerich, Michael Hallsworth, Jim Hawkins, David Huffman, David A. Hyman, Julika Kaplan, Aaron S. Kesselheim, Nina A. Kohn, Russell Korobkin, Jeffrey T. Kullgren, Matthew J.B. Lawrence, George Loewenstein, Holly Fernandez Lynch, Ester Moher, Abigail R. Moncrieff, David Orentlicher, Manisha Padi, Christopher T. Robertson, Ameet Sarpatwari, Aditi P. Sen, Neel Shah, Zainab Shipchandler, Anna D. Sinaiko, Donna Spruijt-Metz, Cass R. Sunstein, Thomas S. Ulen, Kristen Underhill, Kevin G. Volpp, Mark D. White, David V. Yokum, Jennifer L. Zamzow, Richard J. Zeckhauser

How to Be a Better Person

400+ Simple Ways to Make a Difference in Yourself--And the World

Author: Kate Hanley

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1507205260

Category: Self-Help

Page: 224

View: 9074

"This book features more than 300 everyday activities to help you become a better person and make a positive impact on the people around you. How to Be a Better Person is a practical guide that can help you make a positive impact in your home, community, and relationships"--

Black Box Thinking

Why Most People Never Learn from Their Mistakes--But Some Do

Author: Matthew Syed

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 069840887X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 320

View: 372

Nobody wants to fail. But in highly complex organizations, success can happen only when we confront our mistakes, learn from our own version of a black box, and create a climate where it’s safe to fail. We all have to endure failure from time to time, whether it’s underperforming at a job interview, flunking an exam, or losing a pickup basketball game. But for people working in safety-critical industries, getting it wrong can have deadly consequences. Consider the shocking fact that preventable medical error is the third-biggest killer in the United States, causing more than 400,000 deaths every year. More people die from mistakes made by doctors and hospitals than from traffic accidents. And most of those mistakes are never made public, because of malpractice settlements with nondisclosure clauses. For a dramatically different approach to failure, look at aviation. Every passenger aircraft in the world is equipped with an almost indestructible black box. Whenever there’s any sort of mishap, major or minor, the box is opened, the data is analyzed, and experts figure out exactly what went wrong. Then the facts are published and procedures are changed, so that the same mistakes won’t happen again. By applying this method in recent decades, the industry has created an astonishingly good safety record. Few of us put lives at risk in our daily work as surgeons and pilots do, but we all have a strong interest in avoiding predictable and preventable errors. So why don’t we all embrace the aviation approach to failure rather than the health-care approach? As Matthew Syed shows in this eye-opening book, the answer is rooted in human psychology and organizational culture. Syed argues that the most important determinant of success in any field is an acknowledgment of failure and a willingness to engage with it. Yet most of us are stuck in a relationship with failure that impedes progress, halts innovation, and damages our careers and personal lives. We rarely acknowledge or learn from failure—even though we often claim the opposite. We think we have 20/20 hindsight, but our vision is usually fuzzy. Syed draws on a wide range of sources—from anthropology and psychology to history and complexity theory—to explore the subtle but predictable patterns of human error and our defensive responses to error. He also shares fascinating stories of individuals and organizations that have successfully embraced a black box approach to improvement, such as David Beckham, the Mercedes F1 team, and Dropbox.

Running Randomized Evaluations

A Practical Guide

Author: Rachel Glennerster,Kudzai Takavarasha

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 140084844X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 480

View: 6968

This book provides a comprehensive yet accessible guide to running randomized impact evaluations of social programs. Drawing on the experience of researchers at the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab, which has run hundreds of such evaluations in dozens of countries throughout the world, it offers practical insights on how to use this powerful technique, especially in resource-poor environments. This step-by-step guide explains why and when randomized evaluations are useful, in what situations they should be used, and how to prioritize different evaluation opportunities. It shows how to design and analyze studies that answer important questions while respecting the constraints of those working on and benefiting from the program being evaluated. The book gives concrete tips on issues such as improving the quality of a study despite tight budget constraints, and demonstrates how the results of randomized impact evaluations can inform policy. With its self-contained modules, this one-of-a-kind guide is easy to navigate. It also includes invaluable references and a checklist of the common pitfalls to avoid. Provides the most up-to-date guide to running randomized evaluations of social programs, especially in developing countries Offers practical tips on how to complete high-quality studies in even the most challenging environments Self-contained modules allow for easy reference and flexible teaching and learning Comprehensive yet nontechnical

Why Nudge?

The Politics of Libertarian Paternalism

Author: Cass R. Sunstein

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300197861

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 208

View: 3224

The best-selling author of Simpler offers an argument for protecting people from their own mistakes.

How to Run A Government

So that Citizens Benefit and Taxpayers Don't Go Crazy

Author: Michael Barber

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141979593

Category: Political Science

Page: 400

View: 9237

Billions of citizens around the world are frustrated with their governments. Why is this? And what can we do about it? In this groundbreaking book Michael Barber draws on his wealth of international experience advising political leaders, to show how those in power can make good on their promises. 'Refreshingly ruthless ... has an uplifting brio to it' Economist 'Michael Barber is a source of inspiration and wisdom' Andrew Adonis, New Statesman 'Excellent ... there is a lot of common sense and practical wisdom ... a breath of fresh air' David Willetts,Standpoint 'Barber is the global overlord of public policy ... a record around the world of actually achieving change' Philip Collins, Prospect