Inside Congress

A Guide for Navigating the Politics of the House and Senate Floors

Author: Trevor Corning,Reema Dodin,Kyle Nevins

Publisher: Brookings Institution Press

ISBN: 0815727356

Category: Political Science

Page: 60

View: 9624

Required reading for anyone who wants to understand how to work within Congress. The House and Senate have unique rules and procedures to determine how legislation moves from a policy idea to law. Evolved over the last 200 years, the rules of both chambers are designed to act as the engine for that process. Each legislative body has its own leadership positions to oversee this legislative process. To the novice, whether a newly elected representative, a lawmaker’s staff on her first day at work, or a constituent visiting Washington, the entire process can seem incomprehensible. What is an open rule for a House Appropriations bill and how does it affect consideration? Why are unanimous consent agreements needed in the Senate? The authors of Inside Congress, all congressional veterans, have written the definitive guide to how Congress really works. It is the accessible and necessary resource to understanding and interpreting procedural tools, arcane precedents, and the role of party politics in the making of legislation in Congress.

Act of Congress

How America's Essential Institution Works, and How It Doesn't

Author: Robert G. Kaiser

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307744515

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 417

View: 9056

This is an account of how Congress today really works, and doesn't, that follows the dramatic journey of the sweeping financial reform bill enacted in response to the Great Crash of 2008. The founding fathers expected Congress to be the most important branch of government and gave it the most power. When Congress is broken, as its justifiably dismal approval ratings suggest, so is our democracy. Here, the author, whose career at The Washington Post has made him a keen and knowledgeable observer of Congress, takes us behind the sound bites to expose the protocols, players, and politics of the House and Senate, revealing both the triumphs of the system and (more often) its fundamental flaws. This book tells the story of the Dodd-Frank Act, named for the two men who made it possible: Congressman Barney Frank, brilliant and sometimes abrasive, who mastered the details of financial reform, and Senator Chris Dodd, who worked patiently for months to fulfill his vision of a Senate that could still work on a bipartisan basis. Both Frank and Dodd collaborated with the author throughout their legislative efforts and allowed their staffs to share every step of the drafting and deal making that produced the 1,500-page law that transformed America's financial sector. The author explains how lobbying affects a bill, or fails to. We follow staff members more influential than most senators and congressmen. We see how Congress members protect their own turf, often without regard for what might best serve the country, moreeager to court television cameras than legislate on complicated issues about which many of them remain ignorant. In this book the author shows how ferocious partisanship regularly overwhelms all other considerations, though occasionally individual integrity prevails.

Senate Procedure and Practice

Author: Martin B. Gold

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 153811206X

Category: Political Science

Page: 326

View: 7657

Now in its fourth edition, Senate Procedure and Practice is filled with fascinating insights that highlight why certain rules are in place, how they are practiced, and the ways in which those practices have changed throughout history as our federal government and the needs of our electorate have evolved.

Party and Procedure in the United States Congress

Author: Jacob R. Straus,Matthew E. Glassman

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442258748

Category: Political Science

Page: 360

View: 2715

Understanding how Congressional political parties utilize floor procedure to advance a legislative agenda is fundamental to understanding how Congress operates. This book offers students and researchers an in-depth understanding of the procedural tools available to congressional leaders and committee chairs and how those tools are implemented in the House of Representatives, the Senate, and during negotiations between the chambers. While other volumes provide the party or the procedural perspective, this book combines these two features to create a robust analysis of the role that party can play in making procedural decisions. Additionally, the contributors provide an opportunity to take a holistic look at Congress and understand the changing dynamics of congressional power and its implementation over time. The second edition of Party and Procedure in the United States Congress includes case studies and analyses of the changes and innovations that have occurred since 2012, including the “nuclear option.”

Congressional Procedures and the Policy Process

Author: Walter J. Oleszek,Mark J. Oleszek,Elizabeth Rybicki,Bill Heniff Jr.

Publisher: CQ Press

ISBN: 150630432X

Category: Political Science

Page: 504

View: 848

Congressional Procedures and the Policy Process examines the entire arc of the legislative process—from a bill’s introduction, to its signature into law, to congressional review of the law’s administrative implementation—and the many procedural pitfalls that exist along the way. Author Walter J. Oleszek and new co-authors Mark Oleszek, Elizabeth Rybicki, and Bill Heniff, Jr. do not shy away from the complexity of the topic, yet they ensure that the operations of Congress are clearly explained. Through an array of interesting examples, case studies, and the authors’ personal anecdotes, this definitive work delivers timely explanation and analysis of the nation’s premier lawmaking institution.

Congressional Deskbook: The Practical and Comprehensive Guide to Congress, Sixth Edition

Author: Judy Schneider,Michael L. Koempel

Publisher: The Capitol Net Inc

ISBN: 1587332396

Category: Political Science

Page: 593

View: 6562

This comprehensive guide to Congress is ideal for anyone who wants to know how Congress really works, including federal executives, attorneys, lobbyists, media and public affairs staff, government affairs, policy and budget analysts, congressional office staff and students. - Clear explanation of the legislative process, budget process, and House and Senate business - Flowcharts for legislative and budget processes - Explanation of the electoral college and votes by states - Glossary of legislative terms - Relationship between budget resolutions and appropriation and authorization bills - Amendment tree and amendment procedures - How members are assigned to committees - Agenda for early organization meetings (after election, before adjournment) - Sample legislative documents with explanatory annotations - Bibliographic references throughout.

Inside Congress

The Shocking Scandals, Corruption, and Abuse of Power Behind the Scenes on Capitol Hill

Author: Ronald Kessler

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780671003869

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 5612

Uses interviews with insiders to reveal the inner workings of the Congress and the behavior of congressional members

Filibustering

A Political History of Obstruction in the House and Senate

Author: Gregory Koger

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226449661

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 7015

In the modern Congress, one of the highest hurdles for major bills or nominations is gaining the sixty votes necessary to shut off a filibuster in the Senate. But this wasn’t always the case. Both citizens and scholars tend to think of the legislative process as a game played by the rules in which votes are the critical commodity—the side that has the most votes wins. In this comprehensive volume,Gregory Koger shows, on the contrary, that filibustering is a game with slippery rules in which legislators who think fast and try hard can triumph over superior numbers. Filibustering explains how and why obstruction has been institutionalized in the U.S. Senate over the last fifty years, and how this transformation affects politics and policymaking. Koger also traces the lively history of filibustering in the U.S. House during the nineteenth century and measures the effects of filibustering—bills killed, compromises struck, and new issues raised by obstruction. Unparalleled in the depth of its theory and its combination of historical and political analysis, Filibustering will be the definitive study of its subject for years to come.

Climbing the Hill

How to Build a Career in Politics and Make a Difference

Author: Jaime Harrison,Amos Snead

Publisher: Ten Speed Press

ISBN: 0399581944

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 224

View: 6837

Inspiring, nonpartisan insider's advice on how anyone can build a career in local, state, and national government, from two rising stars in Washington government and policy. This inspiring, nonpartisan guide, written by longtime staff members of Republican and Democratic house leadership teams provides all the hard-won secrets and strategies you need to build a career in local politics or Congress, make a difference, and ascend from an internship to leadership. With practical tips on how to not only land a job but also create the foundatio for a lasting and impactful career in public service, this guide will empower anyone who feels the urge to improve this country with meaningful work.

The Field of Blood

Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War

Author: Joanne B. Freeman

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 0374717613

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 3287

The previously untold story of the violence in Congress that helped spark the Civil War In The Field of Blood, Joanne B. Freeman recovers the long-lost story of physical violence on the floor of the U.S. Congress. Drawing on an extraordinary range of sources, she shows that the Capitol was rife with conflict in the decades before the Civil War. Legislative sessions were often punctuated by mortal threats, canings, flipped desks, and all-out slugfests. When debate broke down, congressmen drew pistols and waved Bowie knives. One representative even killed another in a duel. Many were beaten and bullied in an attempt to intimidate them into compliance, particularly on the issue of slavery. These fights didn’t happen in a vacuum. Freeman’s dramatic accounts of brawls and thrashings tell a larger story of how fisticuffs and journalism, and the powerful emotions they elicited, raised tensions between North and South and led toward war. In the process, she brings the antebellum Congress to life, revealing its rough realities—the feel, sense, and sound of it—as well as its nation-shaping import. Funny, tragic, and rivetingly told, The Field of Blood offers a front-row view of congressional mayhem and sheds new light on the careers of John Quincy Adams, Henry Clay, and other luminaries, as well as introducing a host of lesser-known but no less fascinating men. The result is a fresh understanding of the workings of American democracy and the bonds of Union on the eve of their greatest peril.

How Congress Works and Why You Should Care

Author: Lee H. Hamilton

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253110954

Category: Political Science

Page: 168

View: 7599

How Congress Works and Why You Should Care is a concise introduction to the functions and vital role of the U.S. Congress by eminent former Congressman Lee H. Hamilton. Drawing on 34 years as a U.S. Representative, Hamilton explains how Congress reflects the diversity of the American people, serves as a forum for finding consensus, and provides balance within the federal government. Addressing widespread public misperceptions, he outlines areas where Congress can work better and ways for citizens to become more engaged in public affairs through their representatives in Washington. How Congress Works and Why You Should Care is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand the inner workings of Congress, and how all citizens can participate in its unique mission.

The Logic of Congressional Action

Author: R. Douglas Arnold

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300056594

Category: Political Science

Page: 282

View: 833

Congress regularly enacts laws that benefit particular groups or localities while imposing costs on everyone else. Sometimes, however, Congress breaks free of such parochial concerns and enacts bills that serve the general public, not just special interest groups. In this book, the author offers a theory that explains not only why special interest frequently triumph but also why the general public sometimes wins. By showing how legislative leaders build coalitions for both types of programs, he illuminates recent legislative decisions in such areas as economic, tax, and energy policy.

A Glass Half Full?

Rebalance, Reassurance, and Resolve in the U.S.-China Strategic Relationship

Author: Michael E. O'Hanlon,James Steinberg

Publisher: Brookings Institution Press

ISBN: 0815731302

Category: Political Science

Page: 112

View: 2175

How to stabilize the security relationship between Washington and Beijing. The U.S.-China relationship has not always been smooth, but since Richard Nixon’s opening in the early 1970s, the two countries have evolved a relationship that has been generally beneficial to both parties. Economic engagement and a diplomatic partnership together with robust trade and investment relations, among other activities, have meant a peaceful context for reform and China’s rise, helping to lift millions of Chinese out of poverty and giving the PRC incentive to work within the U.S.-led global order. The logic of the relationship, however, is now open to serious debate on both sides of the Pacific. After a period of American preoccupation with the Middle East, President Obama attempted a rebalancing of U.S. interests toward the Asia-Pacific region. With the Trump administration in office, the U.S.-China relationship appears to be at a crossroads: does it continue to focus on constructive engagement and managing differences, or prepare for a new era of rivalry and conflict? Here, following up on their 2014 book, Strategic Reassurance and Resolve, the authors provide a more balanced assessment of the current state of relations and suggest measures that could help stabilize the security relationship, without minimizing the very real problems that both Beijing and Washington must address. The authors are hopeful, but are also under no illusions about the significance of the challenges now posed to the bilateral relationship, as well as regional order, by the rise of China and the responses of America together with its allies.

The U.S. Congress: A Very Short Introduction

Author: Donald A. Ritchie

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190280166

Category: Political Science

Page: 152

View: 9970

In the second edition of The U.S. Congress, Donald A. Ritchie, a congressional historian for more than thirty years, takes readers on a fascinating, behind-the-scenes tour of Capitol Hill, pointing out the key players, explaining their behavior, and translating parliamentary language into plain English. No mere civics lesson, this eye-opening book provides an insider's perspective on Congress, matched with a professional historian's analytical insight. After a swift survey of the creation of Congress by the constitutional convention, he begins to unscrew the nuts and pull out the bolts. What is it like to campaign for Congress? To attract large donors? To enter either house with no seniority? He answers these questions and more, explaining committee assignments and committee work, the role of staffers and lobbyists, floor proceedings, parliamentary rules, and coalition building. Ritchie explores the great effort put into constituent service-as representatives and senators respond to requests from groups and individuals-as well as media relations and news coverage. He also explores how the grand concepts we all know from civics class--checks and balances, advise and consent, congressional oversight--work in practice in an age of strong presidents and a muscular Senate minority.

The American Senate

An Insider's History

Author: Neil MacNeil,Richard A. Baker

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199339570

Category: Political Science

Page: 472

View: 316

Winner of the Society for History in the Federal Government's George Pendleton Prize for 2013 The United States Senate has fallen on hard times. Once known as the greatest deliberative body in the world, it now has a reputation as a partisan, dysfunctional chamber. What happened to the house that forged American history's great compromises? In this groundbreaking work, a distinguished journalist and an eminent historian provide an insider's history of the United States Senate. Richard A. Baker, historian emeritus of the Senate, and the late Neil MacNeil, former chief congressional correspondent for Time magazine, integrate nearly a century of combined experience on Capitol Hill with deep research and state-of-the-art scholarship. They explore the Senate's historical evolution with one eye on persistent structural pressures and the other on recent transformations. Here, for example, are the Senate's struggles with the presidency--from George Washington's first, disastrous visit to the chamber on August 22, 1789, through now-forgotten conflicts with Presidents Garfield and Cleveland, to current war powers disputes. The authors also explore the Senate's potent investigative power, and show how it began with an inquiry into John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry in 1859. It took flight with committees on the conduct of the Civil War, Reconstruction, and World War II; and it gained a high profile with Joseph McCarthy's rampage against communism, Estes Kefauver's organized-crime hearings (the first to be broadcast), and its Watergate investigation. Within the book are surprises as well. For example, the office of majority leader first acquired real power in 1952--not with Lyndon Johnson, but with Republican Robert Taft. Johnson accelerated the trend, tampering with the sacred principle of seniority in order to control issues such as committee assignments. Rampant filibustering, the authors find, was the ironic result of the passage of 1960s civil rights legislation. No longer stigmatized as a white-supremacist tool, its use became routine, especially as the Senate became more partisan in the 1970s. Thoughtful and incisive, The American Senate: An Insider's History transforms our understanding of Congress's upper house.

The Gingrich Senators

The Roots of Partisan Warfare in Congress

Author: Sean M. Theriault

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199339651

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 2833

The Senate of the mid twentieth century, which was venerated by journalists, historians, and senators alike, is today but a distant memory. Electioneering on the Senate floor, playing games with the legislative process, and questioning your fellow senators' motives have become commonplace. In this book, noted political scientist Sean Theriault documents the Senate's demise over the last 30 years by showing how one group of senators has been at the forefront of this transformation. He calls this group the "Gingrich Senators" and defines them as Republican senators who previously served in the House after 1978, the year of Newt Gingrich's first election to the House. He shows how the Gingrich Senators are more conservative, more likely to engage in tactics that obstruct the legislative process, and more likely to oppose Democratic presidents than even their fellow other Republicans. Phil Gramm, Rick Santorum, Jim DeMint, and Tom Coburn are just four examples of the group that has includes 40 total senators and 22 currently serving senators. Theriault first documents the ideological distinctiveness of the Gingrich Senators and examines possible explanations for it. He then shows how the Gingrich Senators behave as partisan warriors, which has radically transformed the way the Senate operates as an institution, by using cutthroat tactics, obstructionism, and legislative games. He concludes the book by examining the fate of the Gingrich Senators and the future of the U.S. Senate.

Committees in Congress

Author: Christopher J. Deering,Steven S. Smith

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1483304507

Category: Political Science

Page: 236

View: 4392

Providing a comprehensive examination of the origins, development, and status of committees and committee systems in both the House and Senate, this edition carries on the book's tradition of comprehensive coverage, empirical richness, and theoretical relevance in its discussion of these essential and distinguishing features of our national legislature. While the second edition focused on the "post-reform" committee systems, addressed the shifts in the internal distribution of power, and hinted at the forces that had already begun to undermine the power of committees, this edition updates that analysis and looks at the reforms that evolvied under the Republicans. It offers complete coverage of the rules and structural changes to the House and Senate committee systems. It extends its discussion of committee power and influence in the context of the "Contract with America," Republican reforms, and the inter-party warfare on Capitol Hill.

Congress

Protecting Individual Rights

Author: Louis Fisher

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780700622115

Category: Political Science

Page: 216

View: 1987

With illuminating case studies and analysis of judicial performance, Lou Fisher very effectively challenges the conventional academic wisdom that the courts are the most reliable protectors of individual rights in the U.S. Indeed, he convincingly undercuts what has routinely been taught for many years about the judicial branch, giving us a new appreciation of the limits of the courts and the central role of Congress in leading the way

Surviving Inside Congress

A Guide for Prospective, New and Not-so-new Congressional Staff - and a Tour for Those who Just Want to Learn how it All Really Works

Author: Mark N. Strand,Michael S. Johnson,Jerome F. Climer

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780963305718

Category:

Page: 273

View: 9551