Higher Recursion Theory

Author: Gerald E. Sacks

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316739465

Category: Mathematics

Page: N.A

View: 6142

Since their inception, the Perspectives in Logic and Lecture Notes in Logic series have published seminal works by leading logicians. Many of the original books in the series have been unavailable for years, but they are now in print once again. This volume, the second publication in the Perspectives in Logic series, is an almost self-contained introduction to higher recursion theory, in which the reader is only assumed to know the basics of classical recursion theory. The book is divided into four parts: hyperarithmetic sets, metarecursion, α-recursion, and E-recursion. This text is essential reading for all researchers in the field.

General Recursion Theory

Author: Jens E. Fenstad

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107168163

Category: Mathematics

Page: 237

View: 2542

Since their inception, the Perspectives in Logic and Lecture Notes in Logic series have published seminal works by leading logicians. Many of the original books in the series have been unavailable for years, but they are now in print once again. In this volume, the tenth publication in the Perspectives in Logic series, Jens E. Fenstad takes an axiomatic approach to present a unified and coherent account of the many and various parts of general recursion theory. The main core of the book gives an account of the general theory of computations. The author then moves on to show how computation theories connect with and unify other parts of general recursion theory. Some mathematical maturity is required of the reader, who is assumed to have some acquaintance with recursion theory. This book is ideal for a second course in the subject.

Bounded Queries in Recursion Theory

Author: William S. Levine,Georgia Martin

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1461206359

Category: Computers

Page: 353

View: 5598

One of the major concerns of theoretical computer science is the classifi cation of problems in terms of how hard they are. The natural measure of difficulty of a function is the amount of time needed to compute it (as a function of the length of the input). Other resources, such as space, have also been considered. In recursion theory, by contrast, a function is considered to be easy to compute if there exists some algorithm that computes it. We wish to classify functions that are hard, i.e., not computable, in a quantitative way. We cannot use time or space, since the functions are not even computable. We cannot use Turing degree, since this notion is not quantitative. Hence we need a new notion of complexity-much like time or spac~that is quantitative and yet in some way captures the level of difficulty (such as the Turing degree) of a function.

The Role of True Finiteness in the Admissible Recursively Enumerable Degrees

Author: Noam Greenberg

Publisher: American Mathematical Soc.

ISBN: 0821838857

Category: Mathematics

Page: 99

View: 2445

When attempting to generalize recursion theory to admissible ordinals, it may seem as if all classical priority constructions can be lifted to any admissible ordinal satisfying a sufficiently strong fragment of the replacement scheme. We show, however, that this is not always the case. In fact, there are some constructions which make an essential use of the notion of finiteness which cannot be replaced by the generalized notion of $\alpha$-finiteness. As examples we discuss both codings of models of arithmetic into the recursively enumerable degrees, and non-distributive lattice embeddings into these degrees. We show that if an admissible ordinal $\alpha$ is effectively close to $\omega$ (where this closeness can be measured by size or by cofinality) then such constructions may be performed in the $\alpha$-r.e. degrees, but otherwise they fail. The results of these constructions can be expressed in the first-order language of partially ordered sets, and so these results also show that there are natural elementary differences between the structures of $\alpha$-r.e. degrees for various classes of admissible ordinals $\alpha$. Together with coding work which shows that for some $\alpha$, the theory of the $\alpha$-r.e. degrees is complicated, we get that for every admissible ordinal $\alpha$, the $\alpha$-r.e. degrees and the classical r.e. degrees are not elementarily equivalent.

Proofs and Computations

Author: Helmut Schwichtenberg,Stanley S. Wainer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139504169

Category: Mathematics

Page: N.A

View: 1999

Driven by the question, 'What is the computational content of a (formal) proof?', this book studies fundamental interactions between proof theory and computability. It provides a unique self-contained text for advanced students and researchers in mathematical logic and computer science. Part I covers basic proof theory, computability and Gödel's theorems. Part II studies and classifies provable recursion in classical systems, from fragments of Peano arithmetic up to Π11–CA0. Ordinal analysis and the (Schwichtenberg–Wainer) subrecursive hierarchies play a central role and are used in proving the 'modified finite Ramsey' and 'extended Kruskal' independence results for PA and Π11–CA0. Part III develops the theoretical underpinnings of the first author's proof assistant MINLOG. Three chapters cover higher-type computability via information systems, a constructive theory TCF of computable functionals, realizability, Dialectica interpretation, computationally significant quantifiers and connectives and polytime complexity in a two-sorted, higher-type arithmetic with linear logic.

Recursion Theory

Computational Aspects of Definability

Author: Chi Tat Chong,Liang Yu

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 3110275643

Category: Mathematics

Page: 320

View: 9378

This monograph presents recursion theory from a generalized and largely global point of view. A major theme is the study of the structures of degrees arising from two key notions of reducibility, the Turing degrees and the hyperdegrees, using ideas and techniques beyond those of classical recursion theory. These include structure theory, hyperarithmetic determinacy and rigidity, basis theorems, independence results on Turing degrees, as well as applications to higher randomness.

Lambda Calculus with Types

Author: Henk Barendregt,Wil Dekkers,Richard Statman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107276349

Category: Mathematics

Page: N.A

View: 3728

This handbook with exercises reveals in formalisms, hitherto mainly used for hardware and software design and verification, unexpected mathematical beauty. The lambda calculus forms a prototype universal programming language, which in its untyped version is related to Lisp, and was treated in the first author's classic The Lambda Calculus (1984). The formalism has since been extended with types and used in functional programming (Haskell, Clean) and proof assistants (Coq, Isabelle, HOL), used in designing and verifying IT products and mathematical proofs. In this book, the authors focus on three classes of typing for lambda terms: simple types, recursive types and intersection types. It is in these three formalisms of terms and types that the unexpected mathematical beauty is revealed. The treatment is authoritative and comprehensive, complemented by an exhaustive bibliography, and numerous exercises are provided to deepen the readers' understanding and increase their confidence using types.

Admissible Sets and Structures

Author: Jon Barwise

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316739414

Category: Mathematics

Page: N.A

View: 1965

Since their inception, the Perspectives in Logic and Lecture Notes in Logic series have published seminal works by leading logicians. Many of the original books in the series have been unavailable for years, but they are now in print once again. Admissible set theory is a major source of interaction between model theory, recursion theory and set theory, and plays an important role in definability theory. In this volume, the seventh publication in the Perspectives in Logic series, Jon Barwise presents the basic facts about admissible sets and admissible ordinals in a way that makes them accessible to logic students and specialists alike. It fills the artificial gap between model theory and recursion theory and covers everything the logician should know about admissible sets.

Computability in Analysis and Physics

Author: Marian B. Pour-El,J. Ian Richards

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107168449

Category: Mathematics

Page: 218

View: 8311

Since their inception, the Perspectives in Logic and Lecture Notes in Logic series have published seminal works by leading logicians. Many of the original books in the series have been unavailable for years, but they are now in print once again. In this volume, the first publication in the Perspectives in Logic series, Pour-El and Richards present the first graduate-level treatment of computable analysis within the tradition of classical mathematical reasoning. The book focuses on the computability or noncomputability of standard processes in analysis and physics. Topics include classical analysis, Hilbert and Banach spaces, bounded and unbounded linear operators, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and equations of mathematical physics. The work is self-contained, and although it is intended primarily for logicians and analysts, it should also be of interest to researchers and graduate students in physics and computer science.

Three Views of Logic

Mathematics, Philosophy, and Computer Science

Author: Donald W. Loveland,Richard E. Hodel,S. G. Sterrett

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 140084875X

Category: Mathematics

Page: 344

View: 7032

Demonstrating the different roles that logic plays in the disciplines of computer science, mathematics, and philosophy, this concise undergraduate textbook covers select topics from three different areas of logic: proof theory, computability theory, and nonclassical logic. The book balances accessibility, breadth, and rigor, and is designed so that its materials will fit into a single semester. Its distinctive presentation of traditional logic material will enhance readers' capabilities and mathematical maturity. The proof theory portion presents classical propositional logic and first-order logic using a computer-oriented (resolution) formal system. Linear resolution and its connection to the programming language Prolog are also treated. The computability component offers a machine model and mathematical model for computation, proves the equivalence of the two approaches, and includes famous decision problems unsolvable by an algorithm. The section on nonclassical logic discusses the shortcomings of classical logic in its treatment of implication and an alternate approach that improves upon it: Anderson and Belnap's relevance logic. Applications are included in each section. The material on a four-valued semantics for relevance logic is presented in textbook form for the first time. Aimed at upper-level undergraduates of moderate analytical background, Three Views of Logic will be useful in a variety of classroom settings. Gives an exceptionally broad view of logic Treats traditional logic in a modern format Presents relevance logic with applications Provides an ideal text for a variety of one-semester upper-level undergraduate courses

Constructibility

Author: Keith J. Devlin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 110716835X

Category: Computers

Page: 437

View: 2909

A comprehensive account of the theory of constructible sets at an advanced level, aimed at graduate mathematicians.

Fundamentals of Mathematical Logic

Author: Peter G. Hinman

Publisher: A K Peters/CRC Press

ISBN: 9781568812625

Category: Mathematics

Page: 896

View: 6052

This introductory graduate text covers modern mathematical logic from propositional, first-order and infinitary logic and Gödel's Incompleteness Theorems to extensive introductions to set theory, model theory and recursion (computability) theory. Based on the author's more than 35 years of teaching experience, the book develops students' intuition by presenting complex ideas in the simplest context for which they make sense. The book is appropriate for use as a classroom text, for self-study, and as a reference on the state of modern logic.

Computability and Randomness

Author: André Nies

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191627887

Category: Philosophy

Page: 456

View: 5159

The interplay between computability and randomness has been an active area of research in recent years, reflected by ample funding in the USA, numerous workshops, and publications on the subject. The complexity and the randomness aspect of a set of natural numbers are closely related. Traditionally, computability theory is concerned with the complexity aspect. However, computability theoretic tools can also be used to introduce mathematical counterparts for the intuitive notion of randomness of a set. Recent research shows that, conversely, concepts and methods originating from randomness enrich computability theory. The book covers topics such as lowness and highness properties, Kolmogorov complexity, betting strategies and higher computability. Both the basics and recent research results are desribed, providing a very readable introduction to the exciting interface of computability and randomness for graduates and researchers in computability theory, theoretical computer science, and measure theory.

Handbook of Logic and Language

Author: Johan F.A.K. van Benthem,Alice ter Meulen

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 9780444537270

Category: Mathematics

Page: 1168

View: 5125

The logical study of language is becoming more interdisciplinary, playing a role in fields such as computer science, artificial intelligence, cognitive science and game theory. This new edition, written by the leading experts in the field, presents an overview of the latest developments at the interface of logic and linguistics as well as a historical perspective. It is divided into three parts covering Frameworks, General Topics and Descriptive Themes. Completely revised and updated - includes over 25% new material Discusses the interface between logic and language Many of the authors are creators or active developers of the theories

Model-Theoretic Logics

Author: J. Barwise,S. Feferman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316739392

Category: Mathematics

Page: N.A

View: 1377

Since their inception, the Perspectives in Logic and Lecture Notes in Logic series have published seminal works by leading logicians. Many of the original books in the series have been unavailable for years, but they are now in print once again. This volume, the eighth publication in the Perspectives in Logic series, brings together several directions of work in model theory between the late 1950s and early 1980s. It contains expository papers by pre-eminent researchers. Part I provides an introduction to the subject as a whole, as well as to the basic theory and examples. The rest of the book addresses finitary languages with additional quantifiers, infinitary languages, second-order logic, logics of topology and analysis, and advanced topics in abstract model theory. Many chapters can be read independently.

Logic for Mathematicians

Author: J. Barkley Rosser

Publisher: Courier Dover Publications

ISBN: 0486468984

Category: Mathematics

Page: 574

View: 4659

Hailed by the Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society as "undoubtedly a major addition to the literature of mathematical logic," this volume examines the essential topics and theorems of mathematical reasoning. No background in logic is assumed, and the examples are chosen from a variety of mathematical fields. Starting with an introduction to symbolic logic, the first eight chapters develop logic through the restricted predicate calculus. Topics include the statement calculus, the use of names, an axiomatic treatment of the statement calculus, descriptions, and equality. Succeeding chapters explore abstract set theory—with examinations of class membership as well as relations and functions—cardinal and ordinal arithmetic, and the axiom of choice. An invaluable reference book for all mathematicians, this text is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Numerous exercises make it particularly appropriate for classroom use.

Metamathematics of First-Order Arithmetic

Author: Petr Hájek,Pavel Pudlák

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316739457

Category: Mathematics

Page: N.A

View: 2770

Since their inception, the Perspectives in Logic and Lecture Notes in Logic series have published seminal works by leading logicians. Many of the original books in the series have been unavailable for years, but they are now in print once again. This volume, the third publication in the Perspectives in Logic series, is a much-needed monograph on the metamathematics of first-order arithmetic. The authors pay particular attention to subsystems (fragments) of Peano arithmetic and give the reader a deeper understanding of the role of the axiom schema of induction and of the phenomenon of incompleteness. The reader is only assumed to know the basics of mathematical logic, which are reviewed in the preliminaries. Part I develops parts of mathematics and logic in various fragments. Part II is devoted to incompleteness. Finally, Part III studies systems that have the induction schema restricted to bounded formulas (bounded arithmetic).