Greek Homosexuality

Author: Kenneth James Dover

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674362703

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 4671

To what extent and in what ways was homosexuality approved by the ancient Greeks? An eminent classicist examines the evidence--vase paintings, archaic and classical poetry, the dialogues of Plato, speeches in the law courts, the comedies of Aristophanes--and reaches provocative conclusions. A discussion of female homosexuality is included.

Greek Homosexuality

with Forewords by Stephen Halliwell, Mark Masterson and James Robson

Author: K. J. Dover

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1474257178

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 9792

Hailed as magisterial when it first appeared, Greek Homosexuality remains an academic milestone and continues to be of major importance for students and scholars of gender studies. Kenneth Dover explores the understanding of homosexuality in ancient Greece, examining a vast array of material and textual evidence that leads him to provocative conclusions. This new release of the 1989 second edition, for which Dover wrote an epilogue reflecting on the impact of his book, includes two specially commissioned forewords assessing the author's legacy and the place of his text within modern studies of gender in the ancient world.

One Hundred Years of Homosexuality

And Other Essays on Greek Love

Author: David M Halperin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113660877X

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 3400

Halperin's subject is the erotics of male culture in ancient Greece. Arguing that the modern concept of "homosexuality" is an inadequate tool for the interpretation of these features of sexual life in antiquity, Halperin offers an alternative account that accords greater prominence to the indigenous terms in which sexual experiences were constituted in the ancient Mediterranean world. Wittily and provocatively written, Halperin's meticulously drawn windows onto ancient sexuality give us a new meaning to the concept of "Greek love."

The Greeks and Greek Love

A Radical Reappraisal of Homosexuality in Ancient Greece

Author: James Davidson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780753822265

Category: Greece

Page: 634

View: 2605

A radical reappraisal of homosexuality in Ancient Greece, by a young historian described as 'the best thing to happen to ancient history for decades' (Andrew Roberts, MAIL ON SUNDAY) Kenneth Dover's 1978 GREEK HOMOSEXUALITY remains the most recent single-volume treatment of the subject as a whole. Drawing on fifteen years of ensuing research, James Davidson rejects Dover's excessively theoretical approach, using a wide variety of sources unknown to him - court cases, romantic novels, satirical plays and poems - to present a view of the subject that, in contrast to Dover and to Foucault, stresses the humanity of the ancient Greeks, and how they lived their loves and pleasures, rather than their moral codes and the theorising of philosophers. Homosexuality in Ancient Greece remains a central area of debate in the classics, in ancient history and lesbian and gay studies. Greek civilisation centrally underpins our own, providing a basis of so much of the west's culture and philosophy, yet the Greeks were more tolerant of homosexuality than virtually any other culture, certainly than the western civilisations that followed. The extent to which Greek attitudes to sexuality and in particular their privileging of 'Greek Love' were comparable and different to our own underlies the continuing debate over the formation of sexuality and the much wider question of the roles of nature and nurture in the formation of human behaviour and personality.

Homosexuality in Greek Myth

Author: Bernard Sergent

Publisher: Beacon Press (MA)

ISBN: N.A

Category: Religion

Page: 344

View: 7977

Suggests that institutionalized homosexuality in ancient Greek society derived from initiatory rituals, looks at these rites among other early cultures

Homosexuality in Greece and Rome

A Sourcebook of Basic Documents

Author: Thomas K. Hubbard

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520234307

Category: Social Science

Page: 558

View: 1003

Important primary texts on homosexuality in ancient Greece and Rome are translated into modern, explicit English and collected together in this comprehensive sourcebook. Covering an extensive period, the volume includes writings by Plato, Sappho Aeschines, Catullus and Juvenal.

Eros

The Myth Of Ancient Greek Sexuality

Author: Bruce S Thornton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 042998040X

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 6233

Eros: The Myth of Ancient Greek Sexuality is a controversial book that lays bare the meanings Greeks gave to sex. Contrary to the romantic idealization of sex dominating our culture, the Greeks saw eros as a powerful force of nature, potentially dangerous, and in need of control by society: Eros the Destroyer, not Cupid the Insipid, fired the Greek imagination.The destructiveness of eros can be seen in Greek imagery and metaphor, and in the Greeks' attitudes toward women and homosexuals. Images of love as fire, disease, storms, insanity, and violence?Top 40 song clich?for us?locate eros among the unpredictable and deadly forces of nature. The beautiful Aphrodite embodies the alluring danger of sex, while femmes fatales like Pandora and Helen represent the risky charms of female sexuality. And homosexuality typifies for the Greeks the frightening power of an indiscriminate appetite that threatens the stability of culture itself.In Eros: The Myth of Ancient Greek Sexuality, Bruce Thornton offers a uniquely sweeping and comprehensive account of ancient sexuality free of currently fashionable theoretical jargon and pretentions. In its conclusions the book challenges the distortions of much recent scholarship on Greek sexuality. And throughout it links the wary attitudes of the Greeks to our present-day concerns about love, sex, and family. What we see, finally, are the origins of some of our own views as well as a vision of sexuality that is perhaps more honest and mature than our own dangerous illusions.

Homosexuality and Civilization

Author: Louis Crompton

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674030060

Category: History

Page: 623

View: 8540

How have major civilizations of the last two millennia treated people who were attracted to their own sex? In a narrative tour de force, Louis Crompton chronicles the lives and achievements of homosexual men and women alongside a darker history of persecution, as he compares the Christian West with the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome, Arab Spain, imperial China, and pre-Meiji Japan. Ancient Greek culture celebrated same-sex love in history, literature, and art, making high claims for its moral influence. By contrast, Jewish religious leaders in the sixth century B.C.E. branded male homosexuality as a capital offense and, later, blamed it for the destruction of the biblical city of Sodom. When these two traditions collided in Christian Rome during the late empire, the tragic repercussions were felt throughout Europe and the New World. Louis Crompton traces Church-inspired mutilation, torture, and burning of "sodomites" in sixth-century Byzantium, medieval France, Renaissance Italy, and in Spain under the Inquisition. But Protestant authorities were equally committed to the execution of homosexuals in the Netherlands, Calvin's Geneva, and Georgian England. The root cause was religious superstition, abetted by political ambition and sheer greed. Yet from this cauldron of fears and desires, homoerotic themes surfaced in the art of the Renaissance masters--Donatello, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Sodoma, Cellini, and Caravaggio--often intertwined with Christian motifs. Homosexuality also flourished in the court intrigues of Henry III of France, Queen Christina of Sweden, James I and William III of England, Queen Anne, and Frederick the Great. Anti-homosexual atrocities committed in the West contrast starkly with the more tolerant traditions of pre-modern China and Japan, as revealed in poetry, fiction, and art and in the lives of emperors, shoguns, Buddhist priests, scholars, and actors. In the samurai tradition of Japan, Crompton makes clear, the celebration of same-sex love rivaled that of ancient Greece. Sweeping in scope, elegantly crafted, and lavishly illustrated, "Homosexuality and Civilization" is a stunning exploration of a rich and terrible past.

Lovers' Legends

The Gay Greek Myths

Author: Andrew Calimach

Publisher: Haiduk Press

ISBN: 0971468605

Category: History

Page: 179

View: 2826

First comprehensive uncensored collection of homosexual Greek myths in 2000 years. Lucian'ss Different Loves, an unabashed debate on gay vs. straight love, frames richly illustrated stories of Hercules, Orpheus, Narcissus, others. Presents positive and negative aspects of Greek male love within historical/cultural context. Carefully documented, suitable for classes in gender studies / history / religion. Notes, bibliography, glossary, map. Study guide forthcoming.

Images of Ancient Greek Pederasty

Boys Were Their Gods

Author: Andrew Lear,Eva Cantarella

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135235996

Category: Art

Page: 288

View: 9586

This lavishly illustrated book brings together, for the first time, all of the different ways in which vase-painting portrays or refers to pederasty, from scenes of courtship, foreplay, and sex, to scenes of Zeus with his boy-love Ganymede, to painted inscriptions praising the beauty of boys. The book shows how painters used the language of vase-painting to cast pederasty in an idealizing light, portraying it as part of a world in which beautiful elite males display praiseworthy attitudes, such as moderation, and engage in approved activities, such as hunting, athletics, and the symposium. The book also incorporates a comprehensive catalogue of relevant vase-paintings, compiled by noted archaeologist Keith DeVries. It is the most comprehensive treatment available of an institution that has few modern parallels.

The History of Sexuality

An Introduction

Author: Michel Foucault

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307819280

Category: Philosophy

Page: 176

View: 3372

Michel Foucult offers an iconoclastic exploration of why we feel compelled to continually analyze and discuss sex, and of the social and mental mechanisms of power that cause us to direct the questions of what we are to what our sexuality is.

The Origins and Role of Same-Sex Relations in Human Societies

Author: James Neill

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786452471

Category: Social Science

Page: 478

View: 8528

"In this work, the author challenges what some call the "heterosexual myth," arguing that human sexuality is not as absolute as prevalent thought suggests. Drawing on historic and current data, the book instead argues that, historically, human sexuality has been ambiguous, and that very few humans are, by nature, exclusively homosexual or heterosexual"--Provided by publisher.

Pederasty and Pedagogy in Archaic Greece

Author: William A. Percy

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252067402

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 1834

Combining impeccable scholarship with accessible, straightforward prose, Pederasty and Pedagogy in Archaic Greece argues that institutionalized pederasty began after 650 B.C., far later than previous authors have thought, and was initiated as a means of stemming overpopulation in the upper class. William Armstrong Percy III maintains that Cretan sages established a system under which a young warrior in his early twenties took a teenager of his own aristocratic background as a beloved until the age of thirty, when service to the state required the older partner to marry. The practice spread with significant variants to other Greek-speaking areas. In some places it emphasized development of the athletic, warrior individual, while in others both intellectual and civic achievement were its goals. In Athens it became a vehicle of cultural transmission, so that the best of each older cohort selected, loved, and trained the best of the younger. Pederasty was from the beginning both physical and emotional, the highest and most intense type of male bonding. These pederastic bonds, Percy believes, were responsible for the rise of Hellas and the "Greek miracle": in two centuries the population of Attica, a mere 45,000 adult males in six generations, produced an astounding number of great men who laid the enduring foundations of Western thought and civilization.

Roman Homosexuality

Second Edition

Author: Craig A. Williams

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195388747

Category: History

Page: 471

View: 3619

"Ten years after its original publication, Roman Homosexuality remains the definitive statement on this fundamental but often misunderstood aspect of Roman culture. This second edition features a new foreword by Martha Nussbaum, a revised introduction and entirely new afterword that take account of recent developments in the field, a new appendix on the ancient graffiti from Pompeii, fresh new translations, and updated notes and bibliography." --Book Jacket.

Bisexuality in the Ancient World

Author: Eva Cantarella

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300093025

Category: Social Science

Page: 286

View: 2018

A history of bisexuality in the classical age. Eva Cantarella draws on a full range of sources - from legal texts, inscriptions and medical documents to poetry and philosophical literature - to reconstruct and compare the bisexual cultures of Athens and Rome. This second edition includes a preface which considers work published since the text first appeared.

Hellenism and Homosexuality in Victorian Oxford

Author: Linda Dowling

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801468736

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 6489

In April 1895, Oscar Wilde stood in the prisoner's dock of the Old Bailey, charged with "acts of gross indecency with another male person. These filthy practices, the prosecutor declared, posed a deadly threat to English society, "a sore which cannot fail in time to corrupt and taint it all." Wilde responded with a speech of legendary eloquence, defending love between men as a love "such as Plato made the very basis of his philosophy, and such as you find in the sonnets of Michelangelo and Shakespeare." Electrified, the spectators in the courtroom burst into applause. Although Wilde was ultimately imprisoned, the courtroom response to his speech signaled a revolutionary moment-the emergence into the public sphere of a kind of love that had always been proscribed in English culture. In this luminous work of intellectual history, Linda Dowling offers the first detailed account of Oxford Hellenism, the Victorian philosophical and literary movement that made possible Wilde's brief triumph and anticipated the modern possibility of homosexuality as a positive social identity. A homosocial culture and a language of moral legitimacy for homosexuality emerged, Dowling argues, as unforeseen consequences of Oxford University reform. Through their search in Plato and Greek literature for a transcendental value that might substitute for a lost Christian theology, such liberal reformers as Benjamin Jowett unintentionally created a cultural context in which male love-the "spiritual procreancy" celebrated in Plato's Symposium-might be both experienced and justified in ideal terms. Dowling traces the institutional career of Hellenism from its roots in Oxford reform through its blossoming in an approach to Greek studies that came to operate as a code for homosexuality. Recreating the incidents, controversies, and scandals that heralded the growth of Hellenism, Dowling provides a new cultural and theoretical context within which to read writers as diverse as Wilde, Jowett, John Addington Symonds, Walter Pater, Lord Alfred Douglas, Robert Buchanan, and W. H. Mallock.