Greece in the Making 1200–479 BC

Author: Robin Osborne

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134104898

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 3148

Greece in the Making 1200–479 BC is an accessible and comprehensive account of Greek history from the end of the Bronze Age to the Classical Period. The first edition of this book broke new ground by acknowledging that, barring a small number of archaic poems and inscriptions, the majority of our literary evidence for archaic Greece reported only what later writers wanted to tell, and so was subject to systematic selection and distortion. This book offers a narrative which acknowledges the later traditions, as traditions, but insists that we must primarily confront the contemporary evidence, which is in large part archaeological and art historical, and must make sense of it in its own terms. In this second edition, as well as updating the text to take account of recent scholarship and re-ordering, Robin Osborne has addressed more explicitly the weaknesses and unsustainable interpretations which the first edition chose merely to pass over. He now spells out why this book features no ‘rise of the polis’ and no ‘colonization’, and why the treatment of Greek settlement abroad is necessarily spread over various chapters. Students and teachers alike will particularly appreciate the enhanced discussion of economic history and the more systematic treatment of issues of gender and sexuality.

The Greek World After Alexander 323–30 BC

Author: Graham Shipley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134065310

Category: History

Page: 568

View: 1222

The Greek World After Alexander 323–30 BC examines social changes in the old and new cities of the Greek world and in the new post-Alexandrian kingdoms. An appraisal of the momentous military and political changes after the era of Alexander, this book considers developments in literature, religion, philosophy, and science, and establishes how far they are presented as radical departures from the culture of Classical Greece or were continuous developments from it. Graham Shipley explores the culture of the Hellenistic world in the context of the social divisions between an educated elite and a general population at once more mobile and less involved in the political life of the Greek city.

A History of the Archaic Greek World, ca. 1200-479 BCE

Author: Jonathan M. Hall

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118340469

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 9158

A History of the Archaic Greek World offers a theme-based approach to the development of the Greek world in the years 1200-479 BCE. Updated and extended in this edition to include two new sections, expanded geographical coverage, a guide to electronic resources, and more illustrations Takes a critical and analytical look at evidence about the history of the archaic Greek World Involves the reader in the practice of history by questioning and reevaluating conventional beliefs Casts new light on traditional themes such as the rise of the city-state, citizen militias, and the origins of egalitarianism Provides a wealth of archaeological evidence, in a number of different specialties, including ceramics, architecture, and mortuary studies

A History of the Classical Greek World

478 - 323 BC

Author: P. J. Rhodes

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444358588

Category: History

Page: 488

View: 2050

Thoroughly updated and revised, the second edition of this successful and widely praised textbook offers an account of the ‘classical’ period of Greek history, from the aftermath of the Persian Wars in 478 BC to the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC. Two important new chapters have been added, covering life and culture in the classical Greek world Features new pedagogical tools, including textboxes, and a comprehensive chronological table of the West, mainland Greece, and the Aegean Enlarged and additional maps and illustrative material Covers the history of an important period, including: the flourishing of democracy in Athens; the Peloponnesian war, and the conquests of Alexander the Great Focuses on the evidence for the period, and how the evidence is to be interpreted

Greek History

Author: Robin Osborne

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415317177

Category: History

Page: 175

View: 5837

Robin Osborne's energetic and lively guidebook is the ideal introduction to the study of ancient Greece, from the end of the Bronze Age (c.1200BC) to the Roman conquest in the second century BC. Covering all the most important topics in the study of the Greek past, it also explores the cultural, political, demographic and economic approaches to Greek history that students will encounter. Professor Osborne sheds light on the full possibilities - and problems - of working with the surviving evidence, by giving examples from archaeological and art historical sources as well as written texts. The book includes a clear and helpful guide to further reading. It is an excellent starting point for those who want to take their studies further.

The Cambridge Companion to Archaic Greece

Author: H. A. Shapiro

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139826999

Category: History

Page: 303

View: 1745

The Cambridge Companion to Archaic Greece provides a wide-ranging synthesis of history, society, and culture during the formative period of Ancient Greece, from the Age of Homer in the late eighth century to the Persian Wars of 490–480 BC. In ten clearly written and succinct chapters, leading scholars from around the English-speaking world treat all aspects of the civilization of Archaic Greece, from social, political, and military history to early achievements in poetry, philosophy, and the visual arts. Archaic Greece was an age of experimentation and intellectual ferment that laid the foundations for much of Western thought and culture. Individual Greek city-states rose to great power and wealth, and after a long period of isolation, many cities sent out colonies that spread Hellenism to all corners of the Mediterranean world. This Companion offers a vivid and fully documented account of this critical stage in the history of the West.

The History Written on the Classical Greek Body

Author: Robin Osborne

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107003202

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 1776

"This book challenges historians of all periods to come to terms with the distortions that they systematically introduce into their work by their reliance on what has been written on paper without looking at what was and was not written on the body. Historians use textual evidence to try to understand what people did in the past. But in interpreting that textual evidence they make assumptions about what past peoples could see. In particular they make assumptions about the way in which the classificationsof language were visible to the eye, as well as conceivable in the mind. This book is concerned with the ways in which texts relating to classical Greece, and in particular to classical Athens, classified people and with the extent to which those classifications could be seen by the eye. It compares the qualities distinguished in texts with those distinguished in sculpture and painted pottery and emphasizes the frequent invisibility of the categories upon which historians have laid most stress - the citizen, the free person, the foreigner, even the god. The frequent impossibility of seeing who belonged to which category has major political, social, and theological implications, which are variously explored here. It also has implications for how history is written which go far beyond the case of classical Greece. Nothing short of a revolution in what historians are prepared to treat as source material will be required to take account of the findings of this book"--

A Companion to Archaic Greece

Author: Kurt A. Raaflaub,Hans van Wees

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118556658

Category: History

Page: 792

View: 1919

A systematic survey of archaic Greek society and culture which introduces the reader to a wide range of new approaches to the period. The first comprehensive and accessible survey of developments in the study of archaic Greece Places Greek society of c.750-480 BCE in its chronological and geographical context Gives equal emphasis to established topics such as tyranny and political reform and newer subjects like gender and ethnicity Combines accounts of historical developments with regional surveys of archaeological evidence and in-depth treatments of selected themes Explores the impact of Eastern and other non-Greek cultures in the development of Greece Uses archaeological and literary evidence to reconstruct broad patterns of social and cultural development

Athens and Sparta

Constructing Greek Political and Social History from 478 BC

Author: Anton Powell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317391381

Category: History

Page: 454

View: 6487

Athens and Sparta is an essential textbook for the study of Greek history. Providing a comprehensive account of the two key Greek powers in the years after 478 BC, it charts the rise of Athens from city-state to empire after the devastation of the Persian Wars, and the increasing tensions with their rivals, Sparta, culminating in the Peloponnesian Wars. As well as the political history of the period, it also offers an insight into the radically different political systems of these two superpowers, and explores aspects of social history such as Athenian democracy, life in Sparta, and the lives of Athenian women. More than this though, it encourages students to develop their critical skills, guiding them in how to think about history, demonstrating in a lucid way the techniques used in interpreting the ancient sources. In this new third edition, Anton Powell includes discussion of the latest scholarship on this crucial period in Greek history. Its bibliography has been renewed, and for the first time it includes numerous photographs of Greek sites and archaeological objects discussed in the text. Written in an accessible style and covering the key events of the period – the rise to power of Athens, the unusual Spartan state, and their rivalry and eventual clash in all out war – this is an invaluable tool for students of the history of Greece in the fifth century BC.

Divine Mania

Alteration of Consciousness in Ancient Greece

Author: Yulia Ustinova

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351581260

Category: History

Page: 396

View: 5867

‘Our greatest blessings come to us by way of mania, provided it is given us by divine gift,’ – says Socrates in Plato’s Phaedrus. Certain forms of alteration of consciousness, considered to be inspired by supernatural forces, were actively sought in ancient Greece. Divine mania comprises a fascinating array of diverse experiences: numerous initiates underwent some kind of alteration of consciousness during mystery rites; sacred officials and inquirers attained revelations in major oracular centres; possession states were actively sought; finally, some thinkers, such as Pythagoras and Socrates, probably practiced manipulation of consciousness. These experiences, which could be voluntary or involuntary, intense or mild, were interpreted as an invasive divine power within one’s mind, or illumination granted by a super-human being. Greece was unique in its attitude to alteration of consciousness. From the perspective of individual and public freedom, the prominent position of the divine mania in Greek society reflects its acceptance of the inborn human proclivity to experience alteration of consciousness, interpreted in positive terms as god-sent. These mental states were treated with cautious respect, and in contrast to the majority of complex societies, ancient and modern, were never suppressed or pushed to the cultural and social periphery.

Ancient Cities

The Archaeology of Urban Life in the Ancient Near East and Egypt, Greece and Rome

Author: Charles Gates

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113467662X

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 1467

Well illustrated with nearly 300 line drawings, maps and photographs, Ancient Cities surveys the cities of the ancient Near East, Egypt, and the Greek and Roman worlds from an archaeological perspective, and in their cultural and historical contexts. Covering a huge area geographically and chronologically, it brings to life the physical world of ancient city dwellers by concentrating on evidence recovered by archaeological excavations from the Mediterranean basin and south-west Asia Examining both pre-Classical and Classical periods, this is an excellent introductory textbook for students of classical studies and archaeology alike.

Brill's Companion to Ancient Macedon

Studies in the Archaeology and History of Macedon, 650 BC - 300 AD

Author: Robin J. Fox,Robin Lane Fox

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004206507

Category: History

Page: 642

View: 5620

Drawing on the latest archaeology, epigraphy and historical interpretation, this major volume presents a survey of ancient Macedon, important parts of which are published by their excavators for the first time, including the palace of King Philip II. Archaeologists and historians of the ancient Greek worlds will welcome this milestone in the study of this rapidly changing filed, packed with new information, interpretations and essential bibliography.

Rome and the Classic Maya

Comparing the Slow Collapse of Civilizations

Author: Rebecca Storey,Glenn R Storey

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315309394

Category: Social Science

Page: 292

View: 9262

This volume compares two of the most famous cases of civilizational collapse, that of the Roman Empire and the Classic Maya world. First examining the concept of collapse, and how it has been utilized in the historical, archaeological and anthropological study of past complex societies, Storey and Storey draw on extensive archaeological evidence to consider the ultimate failure of the institutions, infrastructure and material culture of both of these complex cultures. Detailing the relevant economic, political, social and environmental factors behind these notable falls, Rome and the Classic Maya contends that a phenomenon of “slow collapse” has repeatedly occurred in the course of human history: complex civilizations are shown to eventually come to an end and give way to new cultures. Through their analysis of these two ancient case studies, the authors also present intriguing parallels to the modern world and offer potential lessons for the future.

The Beginnings of Rome

Italy and Rome from the Bronze Age to the Punic Wars (c.1000–264 BC)

Author: Tim Cornell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136754954

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 7398

Using the results of archaeological techniques, and examining methodological debates, Tim Cornell provides a lucid and authoritative account of the rise of Rome. The Beginnings of Rome offers insight on major issues such as: Rome’s relations with the Etruscans the conflict between patricians and plebeians the causes of Roman imperialism the growth of slave-based economy. Answering the need for raising acute questions and providing an analysis of the many different kinds of archaeological evidence with literary sources, this is the most comprehensive study of the subject available, and is essential reading for students of Roman history.

The Archaeology Coursebook

An Introduction to Study Skills, Topics and Methods

Author: Jim Grant,Sam Gorin,Neil Fleming

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9780415360777

Category: Social Science

Page: 346

View: 7944

This fully updated and revised edition of the best-selling title The Archaeology Coursebookis a guide for students studying archaeology for the first time. Including new methods and case studies in this second edition, it provides pre-university students and teachers, as well as undergraduates and enthusiasts, with the skills and technical concepts necessary to grasp the subject. The Archaeology Coursebook: introduces the most commonly examined archaeological methods, concepts, and themes, and provides the necessary skills to understand them explains how to interpret the material students may meet in examinations and how to succeed with different types of assignments and exam questions supports study with case studies, key sites, key terms, tasks and skills development illustrates concepts and commentary with over 200 photos and drawings of excavation sites, methodology and processes, tools and equipment links from its own website to other key websites in archaeology at the right level at www.routledge.com/textbooks/0415360773 contains new material from European pre-history and the Roman Empire; new case studies, methods, examples, boxes, photographs and diagrams; as well as updates on examination changes for pre-university students. This is definitely a book no archaeology student should be without.

The Roman Empire at Bay, AD 180–395

Author: David S. Potter

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134694849

Category: History

Page: 792

View: 9358

The Roman Empire at Bay is the only one volume history of the critical years 180-395 AD, which saw the transformation of the Roman Empire from a unitary state centred on Rome, into a new polity with two capitals and a new religion—Christianity. The book integrates social and intellectual history into the narrative, looking to explore the relationship between contingent events and deeper structure. It also covers an amazingly dramatic narrative from the civil wars after the death of Commodus through the conversion of Constantine to the arrival of the Goths in the Roman Empire, setting in motion the final collapse of the western empire. The new edition takes account of important new scholarship in questions of Roman identity, on economy and society as well as work on the age of Constantine, which has advanced significantly in the last decade, while recent archaeological and art historical work is more fully drawn into the narrative. At its core, the central question that drives The Roman Empire at Bay remains, what did it mean to be a Roman and how did that meaning change as the empire changed? Updated for a new generation of students, this book remains a crucial tool in the study of this period.

Roman Archaeology for Historians

Author: Ray Laurence

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136295313

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 7925

Roman Archaeology for Historians provides students of Roman history with a guide to the contribution of archaeology to the study of their subject. It discusses the issues with the use of material and textual evidence to explain the Roman past, and the importance of viewing this evidence in context. It also surveys the different approaches to the archaeological material of the period and examines key themes that have shaped Roman archaeology. At the heart of the book lies the question of how archaeological material can be interpreted and its relevance for the study of ancient history. It includes discussion of the study of landscape change, urban topography, the economy, the nature of cities, new approaches to skeletal evidence and artefacts in museums. Along the way, readers gain access to new findings and key sites - many of which have not been discussed in English before and many, for which, access may only be gained from technical reports. Roman Archaeology for Historians provides an accessible guide to the development of archaeology as a discipline and how the use of archaeological evidence of the Roman world can enrich the study of ancient history, while at the same time encouraging the integration of material evidence into the study of the period’s history. This work is a key resource for students of ancient history, and for those studying the archaeology of the Roman period.

Greece Before History

An Archaeological Companion and Guide

Author: Curtis Neil Runnels,Priscilla Murray

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 080474050X

Category: History

Page: 202

View: 4762

Presents a guide to the people and monuments of ancient Greece.

The Greek World, 479-323 BC

Author: Simon Hornblower

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415163262

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 396

View: 9639

The Greek World 479-323 BC has been an indispensable guide to classical Greek history since its first publication nearly thirty years ago. Now Simon Hornblower has comprehensively revised and partly rewritten his original text, bringing it up-to-date for yet another generation of readers. In particular, this fourth edition takes full account of recent and detailed scholarship on Greek poleis across the Hellenic world, allowing for further development of the key theme of regional variety across the Mediterranean and beyond. Other extensive changes include a new sub-chapter on Islands, a completely updated bibliography, and revised citation of epigraphic material relating to the fourth-century BC. With valuable coverage of the broader Mediterranean world in which Greek culture flourished, as well as close examination of Athens, Sparta, and the other great city-states of Greece itself, this fourth edition of a classic work is a more essential read than ever before.