Globalization

The Human Consequences

Author: Zygmunt Bauman

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0745656951

Category: Political Science

Page: 136

View: 5361

'Globalization' is a word that is currently much in use. This book is an attempt to show that there is far more to globalization than its surface manifestations. Unpacking the social roots and social consequences of globalizing processes, this book disperses some of the mist that surrounds the term. Alongside the emerging planetary dimensions of business, finance, trade and information flow, a 'localizing', space-fixing process is set in motion. What appears as globalization for some, means localization for many others; signalling new freedom for some, globalizing processes appear as uninvited and cruel fate for many others. Freedom to move, a scarce and unequally distributed commodity, quickly becomes the main stratifying factor of our times. Neo-tribal and fundamentalist tendencies are as legitimate offspring of globalization as the widely acclaimed 'hybridization' of top culture - the culture at the globalized top. A particular reason to worry is the progressive breakdown in communication between the increasingly global and extra- territorial elites and ever more 'localized' majority. The bulk of the population, the 'new middle class', bears the brunt of these problems, and suffers uncertainty, anxiety and fear as a result. This book is a major contribution to the unfolding debate about globalization, and as such will be of interest to students and professionals in sociology, human geography and cultural issues.

Zygmunt Bauman Textbook

Author: Tony Blackshaw

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415355049

Category: Social Science

Page: 170

View: 4735

This timely book provides the definitive concise introduction to the phenomenon of Zygmunt Bauman. After introducing the man, his major influences and his special way of 'thinking sociologically', author Blackshaw traces the development of Bauman's project by identifying and explaining the major shifts of emphasis in his work – the break with Marxism and the postmodern 'turn', and the subsequent refocusing on 'liquid' modernity – as well as offering a clear and accessible guide to the key conceptual hinges which move the reader on. This book, the only concise introduction to Bauman's work on the market, goes on to explain the importance of the full range of persistent themes concerning Bauman, dealing specifically with individualization, freedom, identity, community, social control, consumption and waste, building a penetrating understanding of why these issues matter for this Key Sociologist. Bauman's ideas have impacted beyond sociology into criminology, political theory, cultural studies, leisure studies and so forth, and have also now penetrated outside the walls of the academy into social policy, welfare reform, social work and politics. Making use of pedagogical features such as boxed sections, chapter summaries, an annotated bibliography and links to further reading, this well-written text assumes no prior familiarity with Bauman's work and will appeal to anyone in any of these fields wishing to get acquainted with the ideas of one of the world's most wide-ranging thinkers.

The Wealth of Humans

Work, Power, and Status in the Twenty-first Century

Author: Ryan Avent

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1250075807

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 288

View: 9837

An investigation of how the digital revolution is fundamentally changing our concept of work, and what it means for our future economy.

One World Now

The Ethics of Globalization

Author: Peter Singer

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300196059

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 1843

One World Now seamlessly integrates major developments of the past decade into Peter Singer's classic text on the ethics of globalization, One World. Singer, often described as the world's most influential philosopher, here addresses such essential concerns as climate change, economic globalization, foreign aid, human rights, immigration, and the responsibility to protect people from genocide and crimes against humanity, whatever country they may be in. Every issue is considered from an ethical perspective. This thoughtful and important study poses bold challenges to narrow nationalistic views and offers valuable alternatives to the state-centric approach that continues to dominate ethics and international theory. Singer argues powerfully that we cannot solve the world s problems at a national level, and shows how we should build on developments that are already transcending national differences. This is an instructive and necessary work that confronts head-on both the perils and the potentials inherent in globalization."

Returns

Author: James Clifford

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674727282

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 6366

Returns explores homecomings--the ways people recover and renew their roots. Engaging with indigenous histories of survival and transformation, James Clifford opens fundamental questions about where we are going, separately and together, in a globalizing, but not homogenizing, world. It was once widely assumed that tribal societies were destined to disappear. Sooner or later, irresistible economic and political forces would complete the destruction begun by culture contact and colonialism. But aboriginal groups persist, a reality that complicates familiar narratives of modernization. History is a multidirectional process where the word "indigenous," long associated with primitivism and localism, takes on unexpected meanings. In these probing essays, native people in California, Alaska, and Oceania are shown to be agents, not victims, struggling within and against dominant forms of cultural identity and economic power. Their returns to the land, performances of heritage, and diasporic ties are strategies for moving forward, ways to articulate what can paradoxically be called "traditional futures." With inventiveness and pragmatism, often against the odds, indigenous people are forging original pathways in a tangled, open-ended modernity. Third in a series that includes The Predicament of Culture and Routes, this volume continues Clifford's signature exploration of intercultural representations, travels, and now returns.

Crazy Like Us

The Globalization of the American Psyche

Author: Ethan Watters

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781416587194

Category: Psychology

Page: 320

View: 9181

It is well known that American culture is a dominant force at home and abroad; our exportation of everything from movies to junk food is a well-documented phenomenon. But is it possible America's most troubling impact on the globalizing world has yet to be accounted for? In Crazy Like Us, Ethan Watters reveals that the most devastating consequence of the spread of American culture has not been our golden arches or our bomb craters but our bulldozing of the human psyche itself: We are in the process of homogenizing the way the world goes mad. America has been the world leader in generating new mental health treatments and modern theories of the human psyche. We export our psychopharmaceuticals packaged with the certainty that our biomedical knowledge will relieve the suffering and stigma of mental illness. We categorize disorders, thereby defining mental illness and health, and then parade these seemingly scientific certainties in front of the world. The blowback from these efforts is just now coming to light: It turns out that we have not only been changing the way the world talks about and treats mental illness -- we have been changing the mental illnesses themselves. For millennia, local beliefs in different cultures have shaped the experience of mental illness into endless varieties. Crazy Like Us documents how American interventions have discounted and worked to change those indigenous beliefs, often at a dizzying rate. Over the last decades, mental illnesses popularized in America have been spreading across the globe with the speed of contagious diseases. Watters travels from China to Tanzania to bring home the unsettling conclusion that the virus is us: As we introduce Americanized ways of treating mental illnesses, we are in fact spreading the diseases. In post-tsunami Sri Lanka, Watters reports on the Western trauma counselors who, in their rush to help, inadvertently trampled local expressions of grief, suffering, and healing. In Hong Kong, he retraces the last steps of the teenager whose death sparked an epidemic of the American version of anorexia nervosa. Watters reveals the truth about a multi-million-dollar campaign by one of the world's biggest drug companies to change the Japanese experience of depression -- literally marketing the disease along with the drug. But this book is not just about the damage we've caused in faraway places. Looking at our impact on the psyches of people in other cultures is a gut check, a way of forcing ourselves to take a fresh look at our own beliefs about mental health and healing. When we examine our assumptions from a farther shore, we begin to understand how our own culture constantly shapes and sometimes creates the mental illnesses of our time. By setting aside our role as the world's therapist, we may come to accept that we have as much to learn from other cultures' beliefs about the mind as we have to teach.

Health and Modernity

The Role of Theory in Health Promotion

Author: David V. McQueen,Ilona Kickbusch,Louise Potvin

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0387377573

Category: Medical

Page: 170

View: 4910

Demonstrates how the theoretical underpinnings of health promotion contribute to contemporary public health. Aimed at health promotion practitioners and social scientists, this book explains how health promotion is based on social theory and gives insights into the practice of health promotion.

FDA in the Twenty-First Century

The Challenges of Regulating Drugs and New Technologies

Author: Holly Fernandez Lynch,I. Glenn Cohen

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231540078

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 528

View: 2385

In its decades-long effort to assure the safety, efficacy, and security of medicines and other products, the Food and Drug Administration has struggled with issues of funding, proper associations with industry, and the balance between consumer choice and consumer protection. Today, these challenges are compounded by the pressures of globalization, the introduction of novel technologies, and fast-evolving threats to public health. With essays by leading scholars and government and private-industry experts, FDA in the Twenty-First Century addresses perennial and new problems and the improvements the agency can make to better serve the public good. The collection features essays on effective regulation in an era of globalization, consumer empowerment, and comparative effectiveness, as well as questions of data transparency, conflicts of interest, industry responsibility, and innovation policy, all with an emphasis on pharmaceuticals. The book also intervenes in the debate over off-label drug marketing and the proper role of the FDA before and after a drug goes on the market. Dealing honestly and thoroughly with the FDA's successes and failures, these essays rethink the structure, function, and future of the agency and the effect policy innovations may have on regulatory institutions abroad.

The Globalization Reader

Author: Frank J. Lechner,John Boli

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118737024

Category: Political Science

Page: 624

View: 7035

Completely revised and updated, the fifth edition of this well-regarded textbook charts key topics and recent research in globalization along with the latest complexities and controversies in the field. Includes a new section on globalization and identity and new readings on global inequality, mental illness, structural violence, microfinance, blood diamonds, world citizenship, the global justice movement, and sumo wrestling Contains essential, thought-provoking readings by prominent scholars, activists, and organizations on the many dimensions of globalization, from political and economic issues to cultural and experiential ones Examines foundational topics, such as the experience of globalization, economic and political globalization, the role of media and religion in cultural globalization, women’s rights, environmentalism, global civil society, and the alternative globalization movement Retains the helpful student features from prior editions, including an accessible format, concise introductions to major topics, stimulating examples, and discussion questions for each selection and section

Globalization and History

The Evolution of a Nineteenth-century Atlantic Economy

Author: Kevin H. O'Rourke,Jeffrey G. Williamson

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262650595

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 343

View: 2296

Winner in the category of Economics in the 1999 Professional/Scholarly Publishing Annual Awards Competition presented by the Association of American Publishers, Inc. Globalization is not a new phenomenon; nor is it irreversible. In Globalization and History, Kevin O'Rourke and Jeffrey Williamson present a coherent picture of trade, migration, and international capital flows in the Atlantic economy in the century prior to 1914—the first great globalization boom. The book's originality lies in its application of the tools of open-economy economics to this critical historical period—differentiating it from most previous work, which has been based on closed-economy or single-sector models. The authors also keep a close eye on globalization debates of the 1990s, using history to inform the present and vice versa. The book brings together research conducted by the authors over the past decade—work that has profoundly influenced how economic history is now written and that has found audiences in economics and history, as well as in the popular press. "Fans and foes of globalization usually agree on one thing: its inevitability. But that is a big mistake, as this fine piece of scholarship makes clear. . . . It is an exceptionally rigorous and insightful history of globalization. Its main message—that globalization can sow the seeds of its own destruction—is salutary. It should be required reading for anyone inclined to think that economic history is bunk." —The Economist

The SAGE Handbook of the 21st Century City

Author: Suzanne Hall,Ricky Burdett

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1473987865

Category: Social Science

Page: 730

View: 1450

The SAGE Handbook of the 21st Century City focuses on the dynamics and disruptions of the contemporary city in relation to capricious processes of global urbanisation, mutation and resistance. An international range of scholars engage with emerging urban conditions and inequalities in experimental ways, speaking to new ideas of what constitutes the urban, highlighting empirical explorations and expanding on contributions to policy and design. The handbook is organised around nine key themes, through which familiar analytic categories of race, gender and class, as well as binaries such as the urban/rural, are readdressed. These thematic sections together capture the volatile processes and intricacies of urbanisation that reveal the turbulent nature of our early twenty-first century: Hierarchy: Elites and Evictions Productivity: Over-investment and Abandonment Authority: Governance and Mobilisations Volatility: Disruption and Adaptation Conflict: Vulnerability and Insurgency Provisionality: Infrastructure and Incrementalism Mobility: Re-bordering and De-bordering Civility: Contestation and Encounter Design: Speculation and Imagination This is a provocative, inter-disciplinary handbook for all academics and researchers interested in contemporary urban studies.

Is There a Text in this Class?

The Authority of Interpretive Communities

Author: Stanley Eugene Fish

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674467262

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 394

View: 8347

Essays reexamine the fundamental assumptions of literary criticism, and the debate about interpretation, and offer a fresh approach to thinking about literature

A Twenty-First Century U.S. Water Policy

Author: Juliet Christian-Smith,Peter H. Gleick,Heather Cooley,Lucy Allen,Amy Vanderwarker,Kate A. Berry

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199939381

Category: Political Science

Page: 360

View: 5977

It is zero hour for a new US water policy! At a time when many countries are adopting new national approaches to water management, the United States still has no cohesive federal policy, and water-related authorities are dispersed across more than 30 agencies. Here, at last, is a vision for what we as a nation need to do to manage our most vital resource. In this book, leading thinkers at world-class water research institution the Pacific Institute present clear and readable analysis and recommendations for a new federal water policy to confront our national and global challenges at a critical time. What exactly is at stake? In the 21st century, pressures on water resources in the United States are growing and conflicts among water users are worsening. Communities continue to struggle to meet water quality standards and to ensure that safe drinking water is available for all. And new challenges are arising as climate change and extreme events worsen, new water quality threats materialize, and financial constraints grow. Yet the United States has not stepped up with adequate leadership to address these problems. The inability of national policymakers to safeguard our water makes the United States increasingly vulnerable to serious disruptions of something most of us take for granted: affordable, reliable, and safe water. This book provides an independent assessment of water issues and water management in the United States, addressing emerging and persistent water challenges from the perspectives of science, public policy, environmental justice, economics, and law. With fascinating case studies and first-person accounts of what helps and hinders good water management, this is a clear-eyed look at what we need for a 21st century U.S. water policy.

The Global Village Myth

Distance, War, and the Limits of Power

Author: Patrick Porter

Publisher: Georgetown University Press

ISBN: 1626161925

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 1718

Porter challenges the powerful ideology of "Globalism" that is widely subscribed to by the US national security community. Globalism entails visions of a perilous shrunken world in which security interests are interconnected almost without limit, exposing even powerful states to instant war. Globalism does not just describe the world, but prescribes expansive strategies to deal with it, portraying a fragile globe that the superpower must continually tame into order. Porter argues that this vision of the world has resulted in the US undertaking too many unnecessary military adventures and dangerous strategic overstretch. Distance and geography should be some of the factors that help the US separate the important from the unimportant in international relations. The US should also recognize that, despite the latest technologies, projecting power over great distances still incurs frictions and costs that set real limits on American power. Reviving an appreciation of distance and geography would lead to a more sensible and sustainable grand strategy.

Language and Globalization

An Autoethnographic Approach

Author: Maryam Borjian

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1315394618

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 6741

In this collection of real-life, personal narratives on the theme of language and globalization, scholars from a range of different sub-disciplines of linguistics, time periods, and geographical spaces throughout the world examine the interaction and intersectionality of languages and globalization and the implications of such interactions for world languages and cultures. A feature of the book is the application of autoethnography as its underlying approach/method, in which contributors draw on their own lived experiences (of life, scholarship, and work) to investigate and reflect on linguistic globalization and its issues and challenges against the backdrop of the globalized world of the 21st century.

The Sushi Economy

Globalization and the Making of a Modern Delicacy

Author: Sasha Issenberg

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101216883

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 352

View: 4359

The highly acclaimed exploration of sushi’s surprising history, global business, and international allure One generation ago, sushi’s narrow reach ensured that sports fishermen who caught tuna in most of parts of the world sold the meat for pennies as cat food. Today, the fatty cuts of tuna known as toro are among the planet’s most coveted luxury foods, worth hundreds of dollars a pound and capable of losing value more quickly than any other product on earth. So how did one of the world’s most popular foods go from being practically unknown in the United States to being served in towns all across America, and in such a short span of time? A riveting combination of culinary biography, behind-the- scenes restaurant detail, and a unique exploration of globalization’s dynamics, the book traces sushi’s journey from Japanese street snack to global delicacy. After traversing the pages of The Sushi Economy, you’ll never see the food on your plate—or the world around you—quite the same way again.

Managing for the Future

Author: Peter Drucker

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136009388

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 300

View: 1694

This wide-ranging, future-oriented book is sure to number among the most important and influential business books of the decade. Drucker writes with penetrating insight about the critical issues facing managers in the 1990s: the world economic order; people at work; new trends in management and the governance of organizations.