From the Virginia Plantation to the National Capitol: Or the First and Only Negro Representative in Congress from the Old Dominion (1894)

Author: John Mercer Langston

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781436618724

Category:

Page: 568

View: 2721

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

African American History Day by Day: A Reference Guide to Events

A Reference Guide to Events

Author: Karen Juanita Carrillo

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1598843613

Category: Social Science

Page: 420

View: 6270

The proof of any group's importance to history is in the detail, a fact made plain by this informative book's day-by-day documentation of the impact of African Americans on life in the United States. • More than 365 chronologically arranged entries featuring events and information about African Americans • An introduction that overviews the importance of African American history in a day-by-day approach • A preface that explains the scope, methodology, and rationale for coverage • Primary source excerpts for some events and two vetted books and websites for all events

Frontiers of Freedom

Cincinnati's Black Community, 1802-1868

Author: Nikki Marie Taylor

Publisher: Ohio University Press

ISBN: 0821415794

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 315

View: 4444

Nineteenth-Century Cincinnati was northern in its geography, southern in its economy and politics, and western in its commercial aspirations. While those identities presented a crossroad of opportunity for native whites and immigrants, African Americans endured economic repression and a denial of civil rights, compounded by extreme and frequent mob violence. No other northern city rivaled Cincinnati's vicious mob spirit. Frontiers of Freedom follows the black community as it moved from alienation and vulnerability in the 1820s toward collective consciousness and, eventually, political self-respect and self-determination. As author Nikki M. Taylor points out, this was a community that at times supported all-black communities, armed self-defense, and separate, but independent, black schools. Black Cincinnati's strategies to gain equality and citizenship were as dynamic as they were effective. When the black community united in armed defense of its homes and property during an 1841 mob attack, it demonstrated that it was no longer willing to be exiled from the city as it had been in 1829. Frontiers of Freedom chronicles alternating moments of triumph and tribulation, of pride and pain

Notorious in the Neighborhood

Sex and Families Across the Color Line in Virginia, 1787-1861

Author: Joshua D. Rothman

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807827681

Category: History

Page: 341

View: 2514

Provides a history of interracial sexual relationships during the era of slavery.

Encyclopedia of the Underground Railroad

Author: J. Blaine Hudson

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 1476602301

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 2344

Fugitive slaves were reported in the American colonies as early as the 1640s, and escapes escalated with the growth of slavery over the next two hundred years. As the number of fugitives rose, the Southern states pressed for harsher legislation that they thought would prevent escapes. The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 criminalized any assistance, active or passive, to a runaway slave--yet it only encouraged the behavior it sought to prevent. Friends of the fugitive, whose previous assistance to runaways had been somewhat haphazard, increased their efforts at organization. By the onset of the Civil War in 1861, the Underground Railroad included members, defined stops, set escape routes and a code language. From the abolitionist movement to the Zionville Baptist Missionary Church, this encyclopedia focuses on the people, ideas, events and places associated with the interrelated histories of fugitive slaves, the African American struggle for equality and the American antislavery movement. Information is drawn from primary sources such as public records, document collections, slave autobiographies and antebellum newspapers. Entries contain pointers to related entries and suggestions for further research. Appendices include information such as a geographical listing of selected friends of the fugitive, noted Underground Railroad sites administered by the National Parks Service, a bibliography of slave autobiographies and selected Underground Railroad songs. A chronology of slavery and the Underground Railroad is also included.

A Century of Negro Migration

Author: Carter Godwin Woodson

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486145999

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 7645

Traces the migration north and westward of southern blacks, from colonial era through early 20th century. Documented with information from newspapers, letters, academic journals, this study recounts decades of harassment, hope, achievement.

Between the World and Me

Author: Ta-Nehisi Coates

Publisher: Spiegel & Grau

ISBN: 0679645985

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 176

View: 640

Hailed by Toni Morrison as “required reading,” a bold and personal literary exploration of America’s racial history by “the single best writer on the subject of race in the United States” (The New York Observer) #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER | NATIONAL BOOK AWARD WINNER | NAACP IMAGE AWARD WINNER | PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST | NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST | NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review • O: The Oprah Magazine • The Washington Post • People • Entertainment Weekly • Vogue • Los Angeles Times • San Francisco Chronicle • Chicago Tribune • New York • Newsday • Library Journal • Publishers Weekly In a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation’s history and current crisis. Americans have built an empire on the idea of “race,” a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black women and men—bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up, and murdered out of all proportion. What is it like to inhabit a black body and find a way to live within it? And how can we all honestly reckon with this fraught history and free ourselves from its burden? Between the World and Me is Ta-Nehisi Coates’s attempt to answer these questions in a letter to his adolescent son. Coates shares with his son—and readers—the story of his awakening to the truth about his place in the world through a series of revelatory experiences, from Howard University to Civil War battlefields, from the South Side of Chicago to Paris, from his childhood home to the living rooms of mothers whose children’s lives were taken as American plunder. Beautifully woven from personal narrative, reimagined history, and fresh, emotionally charged reportage, Between the World and Me clearly illuminates the past, bracingly confronts our present, and offers a transcendent vision for a way forward. Praise for Between the World and Me “Powerful . . . a searing meditation on what it means to be black in America today.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times “Eloquent . . . in the tradition of James Baldwin with echoes of Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man . . . an autobiography of the black body in America.”—The Boston Globe “Brilliant . . . [Coates] is firing on all cylinders.”—The Washington Post “Urgent, lyrical, and devastating . . . a new classic of our time.”—Vogue “A crucial book during this moment of generational awakening.”—The New Yorker “Titanic and timely . . . essential reading.”—Entertainment Weekly

The Black Man

His Antecedents, His Genius, and His Achievements

Author: William Wells Brown

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: African Americans

Page: 312

View: 5477


The Negro

Author: W. E. B. Du Bois

Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.

ISBN: 1616403675

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 154

View: 6529

This is the classic history of the African peoples in Africa and the New World, a repudiation of the absurd belief, widely held in the post-Civil War period, that Africans had no civilization but the one foisted upon them by their slave-trading captors.Writing for a popular audience in 1915, DuBois, one of America's greatest writers, lays out in easy-to-read, nonacademic prose the striking and illustrious story of the complex history and varied cultures of Africa. He explores everything from the art and industry of the peoples of the continent to the dramatic impact the slave trade had both in Africa and on her descendants in the Western Hemisphere.Boldly proud and beautifully written, this essential work will delight readers of American and African history as well as students of great American literature.American writer, civil rights activist, and scholar WILLIAM EDWARD BURGHARDT DU BOIS (1868-1963) was the first black man to receive a PhD from Harvard University. A co-founder of the NAACP, he wrote a number of important books, including Black Folk, Then and Now (1899) and The Negro (1915).

The Barbarism of Slavery

Author: Charles Sumner

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Antislavery movements

Page: 32

View: 3003

Abolitionist senator Charles Sumner was absent from the Senate after being attacked and beaten by a pro-slavery Congressman in 1856. This 1860 speech, a fiery attack on slavery, was the first he made after his rehabilitation and return.

The Significance of the Frontier in American History

Author: Frederick Jackson Turner

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 014196331X

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 7448

This hugely influential work marked a turning point in US history and culture, arguing that the nation’s expansion into the Great West was directly linked to its unique spirit: a rugged individualism forged at the juncture between civilization and wilderness, which – for better or worse – lies at the heart of American identity today. Throughout history, some books have changed the world. They have transformed the way we see ourselves – and each other. They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution. They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted. They have enriched lives – and destroyed them. Now Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization and helped make us who we are.

Unto a Good Land

A History of the American People

Author: David Edwin Harrell Jr.,Edwin S. Gaustad,John B. Boles,Sally Foreman Griffith

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 9780802837189

Category: History

Page: 1216

View: 616

"Unto a Good Land offers a distinctive narrative history of the American people -- from the first contacts between Europeans and North America's native inhabitants, through the creation of a modern nation, to the standing of the United States as a world power. Written by a team of distinguished historians led by David Edwin Harrell, Jr. and Edwin S. Gaustad, this textbook shows how grasping the uniqueness of the bAmerican experimentb depends on understanding the role of religion as well as social, cultural, political, and economic factors in shaping U.S. history. A common shortcoming of most United States history textbooks is that while, in recent decades, they have expanded their coverage of social and cultural history, they still tend to shortchange the role of religious ideas, practices, and movements in the American past. "Unto a Good Land addresses this shortcoming in a balanced way. The authors recognize that religion is only one of many factors that have influenced our past -- one, however, that has often been neglected in textbook accounts. This volume gives religion its appropriate place in the story. "Unprecedented coverage of the forces that have shaped the history of the United States While none of America's rich history is left out, this volume is the first U.S. history textbook to give serious attention to the religious dimension of American life. This textbook is not a religious history; instead, it offers an account of American history that includes religious ideas, practices, and movements whenever they played a shaping role. "Comprehensive and current This volume traces the American story from the earliest encounters between the first North Americaninhabitants and Europeans through the 2004 presidential election. Complete and balanced treatment is also given to issues of gender, race, and ethnicity, as well as cultural, political, and economic forces. "A clear and compelling narrative The authors are more than expert historians; they are also talented writers who recognize history to be the retelling of human life. United by a seamless narrative structure, these chapters restore the bstoryb to history. "Multiple formats specially designed for flexible classroom use "Unto a Good Land is available as a single hardcover edition or as two paperback volumes, offering maximum flexibility when adapting curriculum for one- and two-semester courses in U.S. history. The two paperback volumes can be used for U.S. history survey courses divided at 1865 or 1900 -- or at any date in between. "Informative special features to complement the text In addition to the book's exceptional narrative, an array of special features enhances the instructional value of the text and points students to resources for further study. "Includes assistance for teaching and test preparation The instructor's manual for "Unto a Good Land provides helpful suggestions for lesson plans and assignments, and the test bank provides multiple-choice and essay questions for use as study aids, quizzes, or tests. "Suitable for instruction at both secular and religious colleges and universities Drawing on their experience in both secular and religious schools, the authors have ensured that this textbook is suitable for U.S. history classes in a wide variety of settings.

Slave Nation

How Slavery United the Colonies and Sparked the American Revolution

Author: Alfred W. Blumrosen,Ruth G. Blumrosen

Publisher: Sourcebooks, Inc.

ISBN: 140222611X

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 7650

A chilling history of the profound role that slavery played in the founding of the republic.