For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood... and the Rest of Y'all Too

Reality Pedagogy and Urban Education

Author: Christopher Emdin

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807028029

Category: Education, Urban

Page: 232

View: 9286

"Merging real stories with theory, research, and practice, a prominent scholar offers a new approach to teaching and learning for every stakeholder in urban education. Drawing on his own experience of feeling undervalued and invisible in science classrooms as a young man of color, Christopher Emdin offers a new lens on and approach to teaching in urban schools. Putting forth his theory of Reality Pedagogy, Emdin provides practical tools to unleash the brilliance and eagerness of youth and educators alike--both of whom have been typecast and stymied by outdated modes of thinking about urban education. With this fresh and engaging new pedagogical vision, Emdin demonstrates the importance of creating a family structure and building communities within the classroom, using culturally relevant strategies like hip-hop music and call-and-response, and connecting the experiences of urban youth to indigenous populations globally"--

For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood... and the Rest of Y'all Too

Reality Pedagogy and Urban Education

Author: Christopher Emdin

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807006408

Category: EDUCATION

Page: 220

View: 1819

"Merging real stories with theory, research, and practice, a prominent scholar offers a new approach to teaching and learning for every stakeholder in urban education. Drawing on his own experience of feeling undervalued and invisible in science classrooms as a young man of color, Christopher Emdin offers a new lens on and approach to teaching in urban schools. Putting forth his theory of Reality Pedagogy, Emdin provides practical tools to unleash the brilliance and eagerness of youth and educators alike--both of whom have been typecast and stymied by outdated modes of thinking about urban education. With this fresh and engaging new pedagogical vision, Emdin demonstrates the importance of creating a family structure and building communities within the classroom, using culturally relevant strategies like hip-hop music and call-and-response, and connecting the experiences of urban youth to indigenous populations globally"--

For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood... and the Rest of Y'all Too

Reality Pedagogy and Urban Education

Author: Christopher Emdin

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807006416

Category: Education

Page: 232

View: 4128

A New York Times Best Seller Merging real stories with theory, research, and practice, a prominent scholar offers a new approach to teaching and learning for every stakeholder in urban education. Drawing on his own experience of feeling undervalued and invisible in classrooms as a young man of color and merging his experiences with more than a decade of teaching and researching in urban America, award-winning educator Christopher Emdin offers a new lens on an approach to teaching and learning in urban schools. For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood...and the Rest of Y’all Too is the much-needed antidote to traditional top-down pedagogy and promises to radically reframe the landscape of urban education for the better. He begins by taking to task the perception of urban youth of color as unteachable, and he challenges educators to embrace and respect each student’s culture and to reimagine the classroom as a site where roles are reversed and students become the experts in their own learning. Putting forth his theory of Reality Pedagogy, Emdin provides practical tools to unleash the brilliance and eagerness of youth and educators alike—both of whom have been typecast and stymied by outdated modes of thinking about urban education. With this fresh and engaging new pedagogical vision, Emdin demonstrates the importance of creating a family structure and building communities within the classroom, using culturally relevant strategies like hip-hop music and call-and-response, and connecting the experiences of urban youth to indigenous populations globally. Merging real stories with theory, research, and practice, Emdin demonstrates how by implementing the “Seven C’s” of reality pedagogy in their own classrooms, urban youth of color benefit from truly transformative education. For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood...and the Rest of Y'all Too has been featured in MotherJones.com, Education Week, Weekend All Things Considered with Michel Martin, Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, PBS NewsHour.com, Slate, The Washington Post, Scholastic Administrator Magazine, Essence Magazine, Salon, ColorLines, Ebony.com, Huffington Post Education

Between the World and the Urban Classroom

Author: George Sirrakos Jr.,Christopher Emdin

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 946351032X

Category: Education

Page: 20

View: 548

Borrowing from the ideas of John Dewey, schools and classrooms are a reflection of the world; therefore, in order to make sense of the urban classroom, we need to make sense of the world. In this book, the editors have compiled a collection of nine critical essays, or chapters, each examining a particular contemporary national and/or international event. The essays each undertake an explicit approach to naming oppression and addressing it in the context of urban schooling. Each essay has a two-fold purpose. The first purpose is to help readers see the world unveiled, through a more critical lens, and to problematize long held beliefs about urban classrooms, with regard to race, gender, social class, equity, and access. Second, as each author draws parallels between an event and urban classrooms, a better understanding of the microstructures that exist in urban classrooms emerges. “At a time of serious political, economic, and social uncertainty, we need a book like this, one that showcases how the world can be seen as a critical site of curriculum and pedagogy. A powerful intersectional analysis of the world, word, and urban sociopolitical context, authors in this book push the boundaries of what educators know and do in urban schools and classrooms. Grounded in frameworks of critical race theory and culturally relevant pedagogy, authors center essential societal moments that must be viewed as the real curriculum. These moments can equip students with tools to examine ‘the what of the world’ as well as how to examine, critique, challenge, and disrupt individual, systemic, and structural realities and practices that perpetuate and maintain a racist, sexist, homophobic, and xenophobic status quo. This is an important, forward-thinking, innovative book – a welcome addition to the field of urban education.” – H. Richard Milner IV, Helen Faison Chair of Urban Education, University of Pittsburgh

Urban Science Education for the Hip-hop Generation

Author: Christopher Emdin

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9789087909864

Category: Education

Page: 126

View: 6677

Christopher Emdin is an assistant professor of science education and director of secondary school initiatives at the Urban Science Education Center at Teachers College, Columbia University. He holds a Ph.D. in urban education with a concentration in mathematics, science and technology; a master's degree in natural sciences; and a bachelor's degree in physical anthropology, biology, and chemistry. His book, Urban Science Education for the Hip-Hop Generation is rooted in his experiences as student, teacher, administrator, and researcher in urban schools and the deep relationship between hip-hop culture and science that he discovered at every stage of his academic and professional journey. The book utilizes autobiography, outcomes of research studies, theoretical explorations, and accounts of students' experiences in schools to shed light on the causes for the lack of educational achievement of urban youth from the hip-hop generation.

Learning to Liberate

Community-Based Solutions to the Crisis in Urban Education

Author: Vajra Watson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136593861

Category: Education

Page: 248

View: 9335

Few problems in education are as pressing as the severe crisis in urban schools. Though educators have tried a wide range of remedies, dismal results persist. This is especially true for low-income youth of color, who drop out of school—and into incarceration—at extremely high rates. The dual calamity of underachievement in schools and violence in many communities across the country is often met with blame and cynicism, and with a host of hurtful and unproductive quick fixes: blaming educators, pitting schools against each other, turning solely to the private sector, and ratcheting up the pressure on teachers and students. But real change will not be possible until we shift our focus from finding fault to developing partnerships, from documenting problems to discovering solutions. Learning to Liberate does just that by presenting true and compelling community-based approaches to school reform. Drawing on over three years of ethnographic research, Vajra Watson explores the complicated process of reaching and teaching today's students. She reveals how four nontraditional educators successfully empower young people who have repeatedly been left behind. Using portraiture, a methodology rooted in vivid storytelling, Watson analyzes each educator's specific teaching tactics. Uncovering four distinct pedagogies—of communication, community, compassion, and commitment—she then pulls together their key strategies to create a theoretically grounded framework that is both useful and effective. A poignant, insightful, and practical analysis, Learning to Liberate is a timely resource for all educators and youth-serving practitioners who are committed to transforming "at-risk" youth into "at-promise" individuals who put their agency and potential into action in their schools and neighborhoods.

Teaching music in the urban classroom

Author: Carol Frierson-Campbell,MENC, the National Association for Music Education (U.S.)

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781578864607

Category: Education

Page: 194

View: 7469

Examines the issues of music instruction in urban schools and provides political, philosophical, and practical approaches to music education.

The Pedagogy of Real Talk

Engaging, Teaching, and Connecting With Students at Risk

Author: Paul Hernandez

Publisher: Corwin Press

ISBN: 1506304974

Category: Education

Page: 208

View: 8599

For students at risk, Real Talk means real results! Developed by a nationally-awarded educator and former at-risk student, Real Talk builds rapport with students while creating learning experiences that are relevant…and life-changing. The results are transformed classroom and school environments, engaged students, and higher achievement. The Pedagogy of Real Talk guides readers through every step of implementation. They will Develop an understanding of the substantive education theories that underlie the Real Talk approach Learn the how-to’s for implementing Real Talk with any group of learners Understand key approaches for training teachers in Real Talk methodology Benefit from case studies and lessons learned

Hope and Healing in Urban Education

How Urban Activists and Teachers are Reclaiming Matters of the Heart

Author: Shawn Ginwright

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317631935

Category: Education

Page: 162

View: 6971

Hope and Healing in Urban Education proposes a new movement of healing justice to repair the damage done by the erosion of hope resulting from structural violence in urban communities. Drawing on ethnographic case studies from around the country, this book chronicles how teacher activists employ healing strategies in stressed schools and community organizations, and work to reverse negative impacts on academic achievement and civic engagement, supporting their students to become powerful civic actors. The book argues that healing a community is a form of political action, and emphasizes the need to place healing and hope at the center of our educational and political strategies. At once a bold, revealing, and nuanced look at troubled urban communities as well as the teacher activists and community members working to reverse the damage done by generations of oppression, Hope and Healing in Urban Education examines how social change can be enacted from within to restore a sense of hope to besieged communities and counteract the effects of poverty, violence, and hopelessness.

The Battle for Room 314

My Year of Hope and Despair in a New York City High School

Author: Ed Boland

Publisher: Grand Central Publishing

ISBN: 145556060X

Category: Education

Page: 256

View: 1029

THE BATTLE FOR ROOM 314 In a fit of idealism, Ed Boland left a twenty-year career as a non-profit executive to teach in a tough New York City public high school. But his hopes quickly collided headlong with the appalling reality of his students' lives and a hobbled education system unable to help them: Freddy runs a drug ring for his incarcerated brother; Nee-cole is homeschooled on the subway by her brilliant homeless mother; and Byron's Ivy League dream is dashed because he is undocumented. In the end, Boland isn't hoisted on his students' shoulders and no one passes AP anything. This is no urban fairy tale of at-risk kids saved by a Hollywood hero, but a searing indictment of schools that claim to be progressive but still fail their students. Told with compassion, humor, and a keen eye, Boland's story is sure to ignite debate about the future of American education and attempts to reform it.

Schooling Hip-Hop

Expanding Hip-Hop Based Education Across the Curriculum

Author: Marc Lamont Hill,Emery Petchauer

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN: 0807773565

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 193

View: 5255

This book brings together veteran and emerging scholars from a variety of fields to chart new territory for hip-hop based education. Looking beyond rap music and the English language arts classroom, innovative chapters unpack the theory and practice of hip-hop based education in science, social studies, college composition, teacher education, and other fields. Authors consider not only the curricular aspects of hip-hop but also how its deeper aesthetics such as improvisational freestyling and competitive battling can shape teaching and learning in both secondary and higher education classrooms. Schooling Hip-Hop will spark new and creative uses of hip-hop culture in a variety of educational settings. Contributors: Jacqueline Celemencki, Christopher Emdin, H. Bernard Hall, Decoteau J. Irby, Bronwen Low, Derek Pardue, James Braxton Peterson, David Stovall, Eloise Tan, and Joycelyn A. Wilson “Hip hop has come of age on the broader social and cultural scene. However, it is still in its infancy in the academy and school classrooms. Hill and Petchauer have assembled a powerful group of scholars who provide elegantly theoretical and practically significant ways to consider hip hop as an important pedagogical strategy. This volume is a wonderful reminder that ‘Stakes is high!’” —Gloria Ladson-Billings, Kellner Family Chair in Urban Education, University of Wisconsin–Madison “This book is a bold, ambitious attempt to chart new intellectual, theoretical, and pedagogical directions for Hip-Hop Based Education. Hill and Petchauer are to be commended for pushing the envelope and stepping up to the challenge of taking HHBE to the next level.” —Geneva Smitherman, University Distinguished Professor Emerita, English and African American and African Studies, Michigan State University

The First Year of Teaching

Classroom Research to Increase Student Learning

Author: Jabari Mahiri,Sarah Warshauer Freedman

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN: 0807773174

Category: Education

Page: 214

View: 1515

For first-year teachers entering the nation’s urban schools, the task of establishing a strong and successful practice is often extremely challenging. In this compelling look at first-year teachers’ practice in urban schools, editors Jabari Mahiri and Sarah Warshauer Freedman demonstrate how a program of systematic classroom research by teachers themselves enables them to effectively target instruction and improve their own practice. The book organizes the teachers’ research into three broad areas, corresponding to issues the new teachers identified as the most challenging: Crafting Curriculum—how to engage students in learning curricular content, develop their abilities to meet standards, and prepare them for college or careers. Complicating Culture—how to build on the different languages and cultures found in contemporary schools. Conceptualizing Control—how to manage a classroom of 30 or more teenagers and create a climate where learning can take place. The First Year of Teaching offers an array of classroom scenarios that will spark in-depth discussions in teacher preparation classes and professional development workshops, particularly in the context of problem-based, problem-posing pedagogies. “The First Year of Teaching offers us knowledge about urban schools which we could only get by academics and teachers working together. Documenting three themes concerning the complications of curriculum, culture, and control, we learn significant practices that make a difference for new teachers and their students. This is a must-read for teachers, researchers, and policymakers who want to improve urban education now.” —Ann Lieberman, senior scholar, Stanford University “This volume marvelously demonstrates how teaching and learning can be improved by positioning new teachers as researchers within a systematic process for increasing their effectiveness in complex, diverse city schools. Through each seamlessly integrated chapter the authors show us how critical teacher inquiry can provide the meaningful insight and stance needed to inspire engaged pedagogical practice. The First Year of Teaching will serve as a tremendous resource for preservice teacher education, professional development programs across the career span, and university classes on urban education and teacher learning.” —Ernest Morrell, director, Institute for Urban and Minority Education, Teachers College, Columbia University

The Guide for White Women Who Teach Black Boys

Author: Eddie Moore Jr.,Ali Michael,Marguerite W. Penick-Parks

Publisher: Corwin Press

ISBN: 1506351778

Category: Education

Page: 472

View: 4032

Empower black boys to dream, believe, achieve Schools that routinely fail Black boys are not extraordinary. In fact, they are all-too ordinary. If we are to succeed in positively shifting outcomes for Black boys and young men, we must first change the way school is “done.” That’s where the eight in ten teachers who are White women fit in . . . and this urgently needed resource is written specifically for them as a way to help them understand, respect and connect with all of their students. So much more than a call to call to action—but that, too!—The Guide for White Women Who Teach Black Boys brings together research, activities, personal stories, and video interviews to help us all embrace the deep realities and thrilling potential of this crucial American task. With Eddie, Ali, and Marguerite as your mentors, you will learn how to: Develop learning environments that help Black boys feel a sense of belonging, nurturance, challenge, and love at school Change school culture so that Black boys can show up in the wholeness of their selves Overcome your unconscious bias and forge authentic connections with your Black male students If you are a teacher who is afraid to talk about race, that’s okay. Fear is a normal human emotion and racial competence is a skill that can be learned. We promise that reading this extraordinary guide will be a life-changing first step forward . . . for both you and the students you serve. About the Authors Dr. Eddie Moore, Jr., has pursued and achieved success in academia, business, diversity, leadership, and community service. In 1996, he started America & MOORE, LLC to provide comprehensive diversity, privilege, and leadership trainings/workshops. Dr. Moore is recognized as one of the nation’s top motivational speakers and educators, especially for his work with students K–16. Dr. Moore is the Founder/Program Director for the White Privilege Conference, one of the top national and international conferences for participants who want to move beyond dialogue and into action around issues of diversity, power, privilege, and leadership. Ali Michael, Ph.D., is the co-founder and director of the Race Institute for K–12 Educators, and the author of Raising Race Questions: Whiteness, Inquiry, and Education, winner of the 2017 Society of Professors of Education Outstanding Book Award. She is co-editor of the bestselling Everyday White People Confront Racial and Social Injustice and sits on the editorial board of the journal, Whiteness and Education. Dr. Michael teaches in the mid-career doctoral program at the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Education, as well as the Graduate Counseling Program at Arcadia University. Dr. Marguerite W. Penick-Parks currently serves as Chair of Educational Leadership and Policy at the University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh. Her work centers on issues of power, privilege, and oppression in relationship to issues of curriculum with a special emphasis on the incorporation of quality literature in K–12 classrooms. She appears in the movie, “Mirrors of Privilege: Making Whiteness Visible,” by the World Trust Organization. Her most recent work includes a joint article on creating safe spaces for discussing White privilege with preservice teachers.

#HipHopEd: the Compilation on Hip-Hop Education

Volume 1: Hip-Hop As Education, Philosophy, and Practice

Author: Christopher Emdin,Edmund S. Adjapong

Publisher: Brill - Sense

ISBN: 9789004371859

Category: Social Science

Page: 180

View: 9227

The first volume of #HipHopEd: The Compilation on Hip-hop Education serves as a collection of work from scholars, practitioners and students alike who share their research and experiences as it relates to the use of hip-hop in educational spaces.

"Multiplication is for White People"

Raising Expectations for Other People's Children

Author: Lisa D. Delpit

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1595580468

Category: Education

Page: 224

View: 4735

Presents a striking picture of the elements of contemporary public education that conspire against the prospects for poor children of color, creating a persistent gap in achievement during the school years that has eluded several decades of reform. By the best-selling author of Other People's Children.

Pushout

The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools

Author: Monique Morris

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1620974134

Category: Education

Page: N.A

View: 1765

NOW IN PAPERBACK The "powerful" (Michelle Alexander) exploration—featured by the Atlantic, Essence, the Washington Post, New York magazine, NPR, the New Republic and the Tom Joyner Morning Show—of the harsh and harmful experiences confronting black girls in schools In a work that has rapidly become "imperative reading" (Lisa Delpit) on education, gender, and juvenile justice, Monique W. Morris (Black Stats, Too Beautiful for Words) chronicles the experiences of Black girls across the country whose intricate lives are misunderstood, highly judged—by teachers, administrators, and the justice system—and degraded by the very institutions charged with helping them flourish. Equally "compelling" and "thought-provoking" (Kirkus Reviews), Pushout exposes a world of confined potential and supports the rising movement to challenge the policies, practices, and cultural illiteracy that push countless students out of school and into unhealthy, unstable, and often unsafe futures. Called a book "for everyone who cares about children" by the Washington Post, Morris’s illumination of these critical issues is "timely and important" (Booklist) at a moment when Black girls are the fastest growing population in the juvenile justice system. Praised by voices as wide-ranging as Gloria Steinem and Roland Martin, and highlighted for the audiences of Elle and Jet right alongside those of EdWeek and the Leonard Lopate Show, Pushout is a book that "will stay with you long after you turn the final page" (Bookish).

Feel-Bad Education

And Other Contrarian Essays on Children and Schooling

Author: Alfie Kohn

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807001414

Category: Education

Page: 196

View: 1678

Mind-opening writing on what kids need from school, from one of education’s most outspoken voices Almost no writer on schools asks us to question our fundamental assumptions about education and motivation as boldly as Alfie Kohn. The Washington Post says that “teachers and parents who encounter Kohn and his thoughts come away transfixed, ready to change their schools.” And Time magazine has called him “perhaps the country’s most outspoken critic of education’s fixation on grades [and] test scores.” Here is challenging and entertaining writing on where we should go in American education, in Alfie Kohn’s unmistakable voice. He argues in the title essay with those who think that high standards mean joylessness in the classroom. He reflects thoughtfully on the question “Why Self-Discipline Is Overrated.” And in an essay for the New York Times, which generated enormous response, he warns against the dangers of both punishing and praising children for what they do instead of parenting “unconditionally.” Whether he’s talking about school policy or the psychology of motivation, Kohn gives us wonderfully provocative—and utterly serious—food for thought. This new book will be greeted with enthusiasm by his many readers, and by teachers and parents seeking a refreshing perspective on today’s debates about kids and schools.

The Prize

Who's in Charge of America's Schools?

Author: Dale Russakoff

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547840519

Category: Education

Page: 304

View: 7357

A New York Times Bestseller Mark Zuckerberg, Chris Christie, and Cory Booker were ready to reform our failing schools. They got an education. When Mark Zuckerberg announced to a cheering Oprah audience his $100 million pledge to transform the downtrodden schools of Newark, New Jersey, then mayor Cory Booker and Governor Chris Christie were beside him, vowing to help make Newark “a symbol of educational excellence for the whole nation.” But their plans soon ran into the city’s seasoned education players, fierce protectors of their billion-dollar-a-year system. It’s a prize that, for generations, has enriched seemingly everyone, except Newark’s children. Dale Russakoff delivers a riveting drama of our times, encompassing the rise of celebrity politics, big philanthropy, extreme economic inequality, the charter school movement, and the struggles and triumphs of schools in one of the nation’s poorest cities. As Cory Booker navigates between his status as “rock star mayor” on Oprah’s stage and object of considerable distrust at home, the tumultuous changes planned by reformers and their highly paid consultants spark a fiery grass-roots opposition stoked by local politicians and union leaders. The growth of charters forces the hand of Newark’s school superintendent Cami Anderson, who closes, consolidates, or redesigns more than a third of the city’s schools—a scenario on the horizon for many urban districts across America. Russakoff provides a close-up view of twenty-six-year-old Mark Zuckerberg and his wife as they decide to give the immense sum of money to Newark and then experience an education of their own amid the fallout of the reforms. Most moving are Russakoff’s portraits from inside classrooms, as homegrown teachers and principals battle heroically to reach students damaged by extreme poverty and violence. The Prize is an absorbing portrait of a titanic struggle, indispensable for anyone who cares about the future of public education and the nation’s children.

Reaching and Teaching Students in Poverty

Strategies for Erasing the Opportunity Gap

Author: Paul C. Gorski

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN: 0807776726

Category: Education

Page: 257

View: 2226

This influential book describes the knowledge and skills educators need to recognize and combat the bias and inequity that undermine educational engagement for students experiencing poverty. This edition features revisions based on new research and lessons from the author’s professional development work, including the dangers of “grit” and deficit perspectives. “A must-read for educators in schools of all kinds. This accessible, highly relevant book empowers teachers with tools they can use today. Read it, talk about it with your friends and colleagues, and use it as a guide for your next project in educational activism! Our students’ school experiences will surely be better for it.” —Rethinking Schools “Provides a good overview of the topic, delivers clear, well-researched information, and helps all educators expand their knowledge of poverty and social class.” —Choice “Gorski provides practical strategies for teachers, administrators, and school staff that will help immediately improve schools, particularly for the most marginalized students.” —Cheryl Robinson, cultural competency coordinator, Alexandria City Public Schools, Virginia