Food Systems and Health

Author: Sara Shostak

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing

ISBN: 1786350920

Category: Medical

Page: 450

View: 5480

In recent years, the ways in which food is produced, distributed, and consumed have emerged as prominent health and social issues. With rising concern about rates of obesity, food systems have attracted the attention of state actors, leading to both innovative and controversial public health interventions, such as citywide soda bans, "veggie prescription" initiatives, and farm-to-school programs. At the same time, social movement activism has emerged focused on issues related to food and health, including movements for food justice, food safety, farm worker's rights, and community control of land for agricultural production. Meanwhile, many individuals and families struggle to obtain food that is affordable, accessible, and meaningfully connected to their cultures. Volume 18 of Advances in Medical Sociology brings cutting-edge sociological research to bear on these multiple dimensions of food systems and their impacts on individual and population health. This volume will highlight how food systems matter for health policy, health politics, and the lived experiences and life chances of individuals and communities.

Pressure Cooker

Why Home Cooking Won't Solve Our Problems and What We Can Do about It

Author: Sarah Bowen,Joslyn Brenton,Sinikka Elliott

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0190663294

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 3436

Food is at the center of national debates about how Americans live and the future of the planet. Not everyone agrees about how to reform our relationship to food, but one suggestion rises above the din: We need to get back in the kitchen. Amid concerns about rising rates of obesity and diabetes, unpronounceable ingredients, and the environmental footprint of industrial agriculture, food reformers implore parents to slow down, cook from scratch, and gather around the dinner table. Making food a priority, they argue, will lead to happier and healthier families. But is it really that simple? In this riveting and beautifully-written book, Sarah Bowen, Joslyn Brenton, and Sinikka Elliott take us into the kitchens of nine women to tell the complicated story of what it takes to feed a family today. All of these mothers love their children and want them to eat well. But their kitchens are not equal. From cockroach infestations and stretched budgets to picky eaters and conflicting nutrition advice, Pressure Cooker exposes how modern families struggle to confront high expectations and deep-seated inequalities around getting food on the table. Based on extensive interviews and field research in the homes and kitchens of a diverse group of American families, Pressure Cooker challenges the logic of the most popular foodie mantras of our time, showing how they miss the mark and up the ante for parents and children. Romantic images of family meals are inviting, but they create a fiction that does little to fix the problems in the food system. The unforgettable stories in this book evocatively illustrate how class inequality, racism, sexism, and xenophobia converge at the dinner table. If we want a food system that is fair, equitable, and nourishing, we must look outside the kitchen for answers.

Food Policy for Developing Countries

The Role of Government in Global, National, and Local Food Systems

Author: Per Pinstrup-Andersen,Derrill D. Watson II

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801448182

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 400

View: 8728

A "social entrepreneurship" approach to food policy analysis that calls on a wide variety of disciplines (economics, nutrition, sociology, anthropology, environmental science, medicine, and geography).

Making Change

Youth Social Entrepreneurship As an Approach to Positive Youth and Community Development

Author: Tina P. Kruse

Publisher: Social Justice and Youth Commu

ISBN: 0190849797

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 9955

"Whether in the role of college professor, academic advisor, or education consultant, Tina Kruse focuses on facilitating others to reach their potential. She holds a PhD in Educational Psychology and specializes in the cognitive, social and emotional development of young adult students, as well as in enhancing community-based, experiential learning. Tina has taught in the Educational Studies department at Macalester College in St. Paul for 13 years; more recently, she also co-direct a faculty program there to enhance student reflection and lifelong-learning skills"--

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0190492473

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 7751


Mirage of Health

Utopias, Progress, and Biological Change

Author: René Jules Dubos

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813512600

Category: Medical

Page: 282

View: 6745

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Exposed Science

Genes, the Environment, and the Politics of Population Health

Author: Sara Shostak

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520275187

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 297

View: 1042

We rely on environmental health scientists to document the presence of chemicals where we live, work, and play and to provide an empirical basis for public policy. In the last decades of the 20th century, environmental health scientists began to shift their focus deep within the human body, and to the molecular level, in order to investigate gene-environment interactions. In Exposed Science, Sara Shostak analyzes the rise of gene-environment interaction in the environmental health sciences and examines its consequences for how we understand and seek to protect population health. Drawing on in-depth interviews and ethnographic observation, Shostak demonstrates that what we know – and what we don’t know – about the vulnerabilities of our bodies to environmental hazards is profoundly shaped by environmental health scientists’ efforts to address the structural vulnerabilities of their field. She then takes up the political effects of this research, both from the perspective of those who seek to establish genomic technologies as a new basis for environmental regulation, and from the perspective of environmental justice activists, who are concerned that that their efforts to redress the social, political, and economical inequalities that put people at risk of environmental exposure will be undermined by molecular explanations of environmental health and illness. Exposed Science thus offers critically important new ways of understanding and engaging with the emergence of gene-environment interaction as a focal concern of environmental health science, policy-making, and activism.

The Cultural Context of Health, Illness, and Medicine

Author: Elisa Janine Sobo,Martha O. Loustaunau

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 031337760X

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 268

View: 7937

A "one size fits all" approach to health care doesn't work well, especially for America's extremely diverse population. This book provides a lively and accessible discussion of how and why a more flexible and culturally sensitive system of health care can—and must be—achieved. * More than 30 percent new material updates the 1997 edition, reflecting new scholarship and addressing emerging needs * Multiple real-life examples and case studies illustrate and explain concepts * Discussion questions follow each chapter and an appendix with project suggestions is provided * A bibliography offers suggestions for further reading

More Than Just Food

Food Justice and Community Change

Author: Garrett Broad

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520287444

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 296

View: 4716

"Raising concerns about health, the environment, and economic inequality, critics of the industrial food system insist that we are in crisis. In response, food justice activists based in marginalized, low-income communities of color across the United States have developed community-based solutions to the nation's food system problems, arguing that activities like urban agriculture, cultural nutrition education, and food-related social enterprises can be an integral part of systemic social change. Highlighting the work of Community Services Unlimited, a South Los Angeles food justice group founded by the Black Panther Party, More Than Just Food explores the possibilities and limitations of the community-based approach, offering a networked examination of the food justice movement in the age of the 'nonprofit industrial complex'"--Provided by publisher.

Negotiating Opportunities

How the Middle Class Secures Advantages in School

Author: Jessica McCrory Calarco

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019063443X

Category:

Page: 272

View: 7629

In Negotiating Opportunities, Jessica McCrory Calarco argues that the middle class has a negotiated advantage in school. Drawing on five years of ethnographic fieldwork, Calarco traces that negotiated advantage from its origins at home to its consequences at school. Through their parents'coaching, working-class students learn to follow rules and work through problems independently. Middle-class students learn to challenge rules and request assistance, accommodations, and attention in excess of what is fair or required. Teachers typically grant those requests, creating advantages formiddle-class students. Calarco concludes with recommendations, advocating against deficit-oriented programs that teach middle-class behaviors to working-class students. Those programs ignore the value of working-class students' resourcefulness, respect, and responsibility, and they do little toprevent middle-class families from finding new opportunities to negotiate advantages in school.

Environmental and Food Safety and Security for South-East Europe and Ukraine

Author: Ksenija Vitale

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9400729529

Category: Science

Page: 272

View: 883

This book covers important aspects of the field of food security and safety, ranging from fundamental production, through advanced water treatment technologies and detection of novel pollutants, to management and policy making. The discussion strives to develop an integrated approach to solving the associated problems by simultaneously considering sociological, ecological and economic aspects. Special focus is on the environmental management systems that should be integrated in the processes of environmental risk assessment. Also addressed are other technologies applied in the service of detecting, preventing and monitoring possible threats to food security and safety. With its variety of subjects, this volume can serve both as a textbook for advanced studies and as a useful reference source for professionals.

Social Epidemiology

Author: Lisa F. Berkman,Ichiro Kawachi,M. Maria Glymour

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199395330

Category: Medical

Page: 615

View: 3793

"Eleven fully updated chapters include entries on the links between health and discrimination, income inequality, social networks and emotion, while four all-new chapters examine the role of policies in shaping health, including how to translate evidence into action with multi-level interventions."

Beyond the HIPAA Privacy Rule:

Enhancing Privacy, Improving Health Through Research

Author: Committee on Health Research and the Privacy of Health Information: The HIPAA Privacy Rule,Board on Health Sciences Policy,Board on Health Care Services,Institute of Medicine

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 0309124999

Category: Computers

Page: 334

View: 9033

In the realm of health care, privacy protections are needed to preserve patients' dignity and prevent possible harms. Ten years ago, to address these concerns as well as set guidelines for ethical health research, Congress called for a set of federal standards now known as the HIPAA Privacy Rule. In its 2009 report, Beyond the HIPAA Privacy Rule: Enhancing Privacy, Improving Health Through Research, the Institute of Medicine's Committee on Health Research and the Privacy of Health Information concludes that the HIPAA Privacy Rule does not protect privacy as well as it should, and that it impedes important health research.

Whole

Rethinking the Science of Nutrition

Author: T. Colin Campbell

Publisher: BenBella Books, Inc.

ISBN: 1937856259

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 352

View: 5232

New York Times Bestseller What happens when you eat an apple? The answer is vastly more complex than you imagine. Every apple contains thousands of antioxidants whose names, beyond a few like vitamin C, are unfamiliar to us, and each of these powerful chemicals has the potential to play an important role in supporting our health. They impact thousands upon thousands of metabolic reactions inside the human body. But calculating the specific influence of each of these chemicals isn’t nearly sufficient to explain the effect of the apple as a whole. Because almost every chemical can affect every other chemical, there is an almost infinite number of possible biological consequences. And that’s just from an apple. Nutritional science, long stuck in a reductionist mindset, is at the cusp of a revolution. The traditional “gold standard” of nutrition research has been to study one chemical at a time in an attempt to determine its particular impact on the human body. These sorts of studies are helpful to food companies trying to prove there is a chemical in milk or pre-packaged dinners that is “good” for us, but they provide little insight into the complexity of what actually happens in our bodies or how those chemicals contribute to our health. In The China Study, T. Colin Campbell (alongside his son, Thomas M. Campbell) revolutionized the way we think about our food with the evidence that a whole food, plant-based diet is the healthiest way to eat. Now, in Whole, he explains the science behind that evidence, the ways our current scientific paradigm ignores the fascinating complexity of the human body, and why, if we have such overwhelming evidence that everything we think we know about nutrition is wrong, our eating habits haven’t changed. Whole is an eye-opening, paradigm-changing journey through cutting-edge thinking on nutrition, a scientific tour de force with powerful implications for our health and for our world.

A Framework for Assessing Effects of the Food System

Author: National Research Council,Institute of Medicine,Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources,Food and Nutrition Board,Committee on a Framework for Assessing the Health, Environmental, and Social Effects of the Food System

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 030930783X

Category: Medical

Page: 444

View: 5900

How we produce and consume food has a bigger impact on Americans' well-being than any other human activity. The food industry is the largest sector of our economy; food touches everything from our health to the environment, climate change, economic inequality, and the federal budget. From the earliest developments of agriculture, a major goal has been to attain sufficient foods that provide the energy and the nutrients needed for a healthy, active life. Over time, food production, processing, marketing, and consumption have evolved and become highly complex. The challenges of improving the food system in the 21st century will require systemic approaches that take full account of social, economic, ecological, and evolutionary factors. Policy or business interventions involving a segment of the food system often have consequences beyond the original issue the intervention was meant to address. A Framework for Assessing Effects of the Food System develops an analytical framework for assessing effects associated with the ways in which food is grown, processed, distributed, marketed, retailed, and consumed in the United States. The framework will allow users to recognize effects across the full food system, consider all domains and dimensions of effects, account for systems dynamics and complexities, and choose appropriate methods for analysis. This report provides example applications of the framework based on complex questions that are currently under debate: consumption of a healthy and safe diet, food security, animal welfare, and preserving the environment and its resources. A Framework for Assessing Effects of the Food System describes the U.S. food system and provides a brief history of its evolution into the current system. This report identifies some of the real and potential implications of the current system in terms of its health, environmental, and socioeconomic effects along with a sense for the complexities of the system, potential metrics, and some of the data needs that are required to assess the effects. The overview of the food system and the framework described in this report will be an essential resource for decision makers, researchers, and others to examine the possible impacts of alternative policies or agricultural or food processing practices.

Dying and Living in the Neighborhood

A Street-Level View of America’s Healthcare Promise

Author: Prabhjot Singh

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421420449

Category: Architecture

Page: 312

View: 4963

Even as US spending on healthcare skyrockets, impoverished Americans continue to fall ill and die of preventable conditions. Although the majority of health outcomes are shaped by non-medical factors, public and private healthcare reform efforts have largely ignored the complex local circumstances that make it difficult for struggling men, women, and children to live healthier lives. In Dying and Living in the Neighborhood, Dr. Prabhjot Singh argues that we must look beyond the walls of the hospital and into the neighborhoods where patients live and die to address the troubling rise in chronic disease. Building on his training as a physician in Harlem, Dr. Singh draws from research in sociology and economics to look at how our healthcare systems are designed and how the development of technologies like the Internet enable us to rethink strategies for assembling healthier neighborhoods. In part I, Singh presents the story of Ray, a patient whose death illuminated how he had lived, his neighborhood context, and the forces that accelerated his decline. In part II, Singh introduces nationally recognized pioneers who are acting on the local level to build critical components of a neighborhood-based health system. In the process, he encounters a movement of people and organizations with similar visions of a porous, neighborhood-embedded healthcare system. Finally, in part III he explores how civic technologies may help forge a new set of relationships among healthcare, public health, and community development. Every rising public health leader, frontline clinician, and policymaker in the country should read this book to better understand how they can contribute to a more integrated and supportive healthcare system.

Better But Not Well

Mental Health Policy in the United States since 1950

Author: Richard G. Frank,Sherry A. Glied

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 0801889103

Category: Law

Page: 208

View: 8018

The past half-century has been marked by major changes in the treatment of mental illness: important advances in understanding mental illnesses, increases in spending on mental health care and support of people with mental illnesses, and the availability of new medications that are easier for the patient to tolerate. Although these changes have made things better for those who have mental illness, they are not quite enough. In Better But Not Well, Richard G. Frank and Sherry A. Glied examine the well-being of people with mental illness in the United States over the past fifty years, addressing issues such as economics, treatment, standards of living, rights, and stigma. Marshaling a range of new empirical evidence, they first argue that people with mental illness—severe and persistent disorders as well as less serious mental health conditions—are faring better today than in the past. Improvements have come about for unheralded and unexpected reasons. Rather than being a result of more effective mental health treatments, progress has come from the growth of private health insurance and of mainstream social programs—such as Medicaid, Supplemental Security Income, housing vouchers, and food stamps—and the development of new treatments that are easier for patients to tolerate and for physicians to manage. The authors remind us that, despite the progress that has been made, this disadvantaged group remains worse off than most others in society. The "mainstreaming" of persons with mental illness has left a policy void, where governmental institutions responsible for meeting the needs of mental health patients lack resources and programmatic authority. To fill this void, Frank and Glied suggest that institutional resources be applied systematically and routinely to examine and address how federal and state programs affect the well-being of people with mental illness. -- Kathleen Brown RN, MSN, PhD