Ethnicity and Everyday Life

Author: Christian Karner

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134198566

Category: Social Science

Page: 188

View: 2289

Mixing theories of the everyday with a wide range of case studies, this book explains the 'character' of ethnicity, from being a political tool of exclusion, to a source of meaning and solidarity, and the relationship between culture, power and identity. Combining theories of the everyday with empirical case studies, this book examines: the 'dual character' of ethnicity – as a political tool of exclusion and source of meaning/ solidarity respectively the relationship between culture, power and identity the significance of historical/socio-economic contexts to ethnicity and everyday life. This book addresses many important questions through a critical application of theories of the everyday to a series of case studies that include travellers, the South Asian diaspora, contemporary Austria, and asylum seekers in 'Fortress Europe'. This book provides an accessible and coherent introduction to the sociology of ethnicity and will be essential reading for undergraduate students on cultural studies, race and ethnic studies, and sociology courses.

Globalization and Everyday Life

Author: Larry Ray

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134327013

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 256

View: 7676

Globalization and Everyday Life provides an accessible account of globalization by developing two themes in particular. First, globalization is an outcome of structural and cultural processes that manifest in different ways in economy, politics, culture and organizations. So the globalized world is increasingly heterogeneous, unequal and conflictual rather than integrated and ordered. Secondly, globalization is sustained and created by the everyday actions of people and institutions. Both of these have far-reaching consequences for everyday life and are fully explored in this volume. Larry Ray skilfully guides students through the various aspects of the globalization debate and illustrates key arguments with reference to specific topics including nation, state and cosmopolitanism, virtual societies, transnationals and development. This innovative book provides this information in a clear and concise manner suitable for the undergraduate student studying sociology, social geography, globalization and development studies.

Culture and Everyday Life

Author: David Inglis

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415319263

Category: Social Science

Page: 159

View: 640

This lively and accessible new book reconsiders the different views as to what 'culture' is, how it operates, and how it relates to other aspects of the human (and non-human) world.

Sociology

Exploring the Architecture of Everyday Life

Author: David M. Newman

Publisher: Pine Forge Press

ISBN: 1412987296

Category: Social Science

Page: 601

View: 3693

Continuing his tradition of highly engaging, trade-like writing, best-selling author David Newman once again starts in a familiar place—the everyday world—and then introduces sociological concepts and institutions as they influence students’ daily existence. Full of vivid, real-world examples and touching personal vignettes, this text offers a solid introduction to basic sociological concepts and helps students realize their role in constructing, planning, maintaining, and fixing society.

Consumption and Everyday Life

2nd edition

Author: Mark Paterson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317337840

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 7292

With an emphasis on everyday life, this respected text offers a lively and perceptive account of the key theories and ideas which dominate the field of consumption and consumer culture. Engaging case studies describe forms of consumption familiar to the student, provide some historical context, and illustrate how a range of theoretical perspectives – from theories of practice, to semiotics, to psychoanalysis – apply. Written by an experienced teacher, the book offers a comprehensive grounding drawing on the literature in sociology, geography, cultural studies, and anthropology. This new revised and expanded edition includes more extended discussion of gender, the senses, sustainability, globalization, and the environment, as well as a brand-new chapter on the ethics of consumption.

What We Now Know About Race and Ethnicity

Author: Michael Banton

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 178238717X

Category: Philosophy

Page: 178

View: 7296

Attempts of nineteenth-century writers to establish "race" as a biological concept failed after Charles Darwin opened the door to a new world of knowledge. Yet this word already had a place in the organization of everyday life and in ordinary English language usage. This book explains how the idea of race became so important in the USA, generating conceptual confusion that can now be clarified. Developing an international approach, it reviews references to "race," "racism," and "ethnicity" in sociology, anthropology, philosophy, and comparative politics and identifies promising lines of research that may make it possible to supersede misleading notions of race in the social sciences.

Understanding Everyday Life

Author: Tony Bennett,Diane Watson

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9780631233084

Category: Social Science

Page: 360

View: 9736

By focusing on familiar sites and scenes – the home, the pub, the street – this text introduces students to contemporary debates about the social organisation of everyday life. Introduces debates about the sociology of everyday life in an accessible, student-friendly manner. Covers major topics in the sociology of daily life from the private sphere through to work, consumption and the community. Shows how the perspectives of sociology, cultural studies and feminism can shed new light on everyday life. Employs a wide range of richly-worked examples to illustrate the debates. Forms part of a four-book series on sociology and society. For more information about this book and the Sociology & Society series, visit the accompanying website at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/ou

Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Class

The Sociology of Group Conflict and Change

Author: Joseph F. Healey,Andi Stepnick,Eileen O'Brien

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1506399754

Category: Social Science

Page: 592

View: 4865

Known for its clear and engaging writing, the bestselling Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Class by Joseph F. Healey, Andi Stepnick, and Eileen O’Brien has been thoroughly updated to make it fresher, more relevant, and more accessible to undergraduates. The Eighth Edition retains the same use of sociological theory to tell the story of race and other socially constructed inequalities in the U.S. and for examining the variety of experiences within each minority group, particularly differences between those of men and women. This edition also puts greater emphasis on intersectionality, gender, and sexual orientation that will offer students a deeper understanding of diversity. New to this Edition New co-author Andi Stepnick adds fresh perspectives to the book from her teaching and research on race, gender, social movements, and popular culture. New coverage of intersectionality, gender, and sexual orientation offer students a deeper understanding of diversity in the U.S. The text has been thoroughly updated from hundreds of new sources to reflect the latest research, current events, and changes in U.S. society. 80 new and updated graphs, tables, maps, and graphics draw on a wide range of sources, including the U.S. Census, Gallup, and Pew. 35 new internet activities provide opportunities for students to apply concepts by exploring oral history archives, art exhibits, video clips, and other online sites.

Religion and Everyday Life

Author: Stephen Hunt

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134265484

Category: Religion

Page: 204

View: 1563

This introductory text explores the historical and contemporary relevance of religion to social life, through an examination of practice and belief. Author Hunt reconsiders how theories and concepts are lived at the level of selfhood and cultural identity, through religious and spiritual belief. At the same time he looks at contemporary changes in religious life and how these are impacted by socialization, institutional belonging, and belief, and at the significance of class, gender, age and ethnicity. Individual chapters cover a range of issues, such as: religion, identity and community secularization and pluralism traditional Christianity: change and continuity globalization and the global context religion and ethnicity. The text challenges much current sociological thought and deals with contemporary Christianity, a range of world faiths and new and developing expressions of religion and spirituality. With tables and diagrams to illustrate key points and trends, it provides an accessible and captivating introduction to the sociology of religion.

Genetics and the Unsettled Past

The Collision of DNA, Race, and History

Author: Keith Wailoo,Alondra Nelson,Catherine Lee

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813553369

Category: Medical

Page: 370

View: 1715

Our genetic markers have come to be regarded as portals to the past. Analysis of these markers is increasingly used to tell the story of human migration; to investigate and judge issues of social membership and kinship; to rewrite history and collective memory; to right past wrongs and to arbitrate legal claims and human rights controversies; and to open new thinking about health and well-being. At the same time, in many societies genetic evidence is being called upon to perform a kind of racially charged cultural work: to repair the racial past and to transform scholarly and popular opinion about the “nature” of identity in the present. Genetics and the Unsettled Past considers the alignment of genetic science with commercial genealogy, with legal and forensic developments, and with pharmaceutical innovation to examine how these trends lend renewed authority to biological understandings of race and history. This unique collection brings together scholars from a wide range of disciplines—biology, history, cultural studies, law, medicine, anthropology, ethnic studies, sociology—to explore the emerging and often contested connections among race, DNA, and history. Written for a general audience, the book’s essays touch upon a variety of topics, including the rise and implications of DNA in genealogy, law, and other fields; the cultural and political uses and misuses of genetic information; the way in which DNA testing is reshaping understandings of group identity for French Canadians, Native Americans, South Africans, and many others within and across cultural and national boundaries; and the sweeping implications of genetics for society today.

Race and Ethnicity in America

Author: John Iceland

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520286928

Category: Social Science

Page: 216

View: 3198

"This book examines patterns and trends in racial inequality over the past several decades. Iceland finds that color lines have softened over time, as there has been some narrowing of differences across many indicators for most groups over the past sixty years. Asian Americans in particular have reached socioeconomic parity with white Americans. Nevertheless, deep-seated inequalities in income, poverty, unemployment, and health remain, especially among blacks, and, to a lesser extent, Hispanics. The causes for disadvantage for the groups vary, ranging from a legacy of racism, current discrimination, human capital deficits, the unfolding process of immigrant incorporation, and cultural responses to disadvantage."--Provided by publisher.

Ethnicity and Race

Making Identities in a Changing World

Author: Stephen Cornell,Douglas Hartmann

Publisher: Pine Forge Press

ISBN: 1412941105

Category: Social Science

Page: 311

View: 4701

"This book is very well written and clearly organized throughout. It is pitched at upper-level undergraduate and graduate-level race and ethnicity students...in sum, this is an important book, highly recommended to students and faculty alike. The authors draw extensively from classic and contemporary sociological theory throughout the text and maintain a transnational focus in each and every chapter." —TEACHING SOCIOLOGY Ethnicity and Race: Making Identities in a Changing World, Second Edition uses examples and extended case studies from all over the world to craft a compelling, even-handed account of the power and persistence of ethnicity and race in the contemporary world. Known for its conceptual clarity, world-historical scope, and fair-minded treatment of these oft controversial topics, this updated and expanded edition retains all of the core elements and constructionist insights of the original.

Ethnic Origins

The Adaptation of Cambodian and Hmong Refugees in Four American Cities

Author: Jeremy Hein

Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation

ISBN: 1610442830

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 6715

Immigration studies have increasingly focused on how immigrant adaptation to their new homelands is influenced by the social structures in the sending society, particularly its economy. Less scholarly research has focused on the ways that the cultural make-up of immigrant homelands influences their adaptation to life in a new country. In Ethnic Origins, Jeremy Hein investigates the role of religion, family, and other cultural factors on immigrant incorporation into American society by comparing the experiences of two little-known immigrant groups living in four different American cities not commonly regarded as immigrant gateways. Ethnic Origins provides an in-depth look at Hmong and Khmer refugees—people who left Asia as a result of failed U.S. foreign policy in their countries. These groups share low socio-economic status, but are vastly different in their norms, values, and histories. Hein compares their experience in two small towns—Rochester, Minnesota and Eau Claire, Wisconsin—and in two big cities—Chicago and Milwaukee—and examines how each group adjusted to these different settings. The two groups encountered both community hospitality and narrow-minded hatred in the small towns, contrasting sharply with the cold anonymity of the urban pecking order in the larger cities. Hein finds that for each group, their ethnic background was more important in shaping adaptation patterns than the place in which they settled. Hein shows how, in both the cities and towns, the Hmong’s sharply drawn ethnic boundaries and minority status in their native land left them with less affinity for U.S. citizenship or “Asian American” panethnicity than the Khmer, whose ethnic boundary is more porous. Their differing ethnic backgrounds also influenced their reactions to prejudice and discrimination. The Hmong, with a strong group identity, perceived greater social inequality and supported collective political action to redress wrongs more than the individualistic Khmer, who tended to view personal hardship as a solitary misfortune, rather than part of a larger-scale injustice. Examining two unique immigrant groups in communities where immigrants have not traditionally settled, Ethnic Origins vividly illustrates the factors that shape immigrants’ response to American society and suggests a need to refine prevailing theories of immigration. Hein’s book is at once a novel look at a little-known segment of America’s melting pot and a significant contribution to research on Asian immigration to the United States. A Volume in the American Sociological Association’s Rose Series in Sociology

Working-Class White

The Making and Unmaking of Race Relations

Author: Monica McDermott

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520248090

Category: History

Page: 196

View: 9779

"Fresh and thought-provoking. McDermott contributes to the understanding of how even small daily encounters can be powerfully affected by racial stereotypes and preconceptions."—Julia Wrigley, author of Other People's Children "A true 'insider's' account of how many whites now live and negotiate the color-line, McDermott deftly lifts the veil of the public ideology of tolerance to reveal the gritty durability of the racial divide. This book provides an important new sociological approach on racial attitudes and relations."—Lawrence D. Bobo, Martin Luther King Jr. Centennial Professor, Stanford University "This bold new urban ethnography reveals the meaning of whiteness for the working class in their everyday lived experiences. McDermott offers an insightful, honest, and comprehensive account of everyday black-white interactions. This is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand the tangled realities of race and class in 21st century America."—Mary C. Waters, author of Black Identities: West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities "Working Class White is an essential read for anyone concerned about the enduring problem of race in America."—Katherine S. Newman, author of Chutes and Ladders: Navigating the Low Wage Labor Market

The New Sociology of Knowledge

The Life and Work of Peter L. Berger

Author: Michaela Pfadenhauer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351478443

Category: Social Science

Page: 175

View: 7506

A classical sociologist can be defined as someone whose works occupied a central position among the sociological ideas and notions of an era. Following this criterion, Michaela Pfadenhauer demonstrates the relevance of Peter L. Berger's work to the sociology of knowledge. Pfadenhauer shows that Berger is not only a sociologist of religion, but one whose works are characterized by a sociology-of-knowledge perspective.Berger stands out among his fellow social scientists both quantitatively and qualitatively. He has written numerous books, which have been translated into many languages, and a multitude of essays in scholarly journals and popular magazines. For decades, he has played a role in shaping both public debate and social scientific discourse in America and far beyond.As a sociologist of knowledge, Berger has played three roles: he has been a theoretician of modern life, an analyst of modern religiosity, and an empiricist of global economic culture. In all areas, the focus on processes rather than status quo is characteristic of Berger's thinking. This book provides an in-depth view on the critical thinking of one of the most important sociologists that present times has to offer. It includes four written essays by Berger.

Race and Gender in the Classroom

Teachers, Privilege, and Enduring Social Inequalities

Author: Laurie Cooper Stoll

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739176439

Category: Social Science

Page: 182

View: 1384

Race and Gender in the Classroom explores the paradoxes of education, race, and gender, as Laurie Cooper Stoll follows eighteen teachers carrying out their roles as educators in an era of “post-racial” and “post-gendered” politics. Because there are a number of contentious issues converging simultaneously in these teachers’ everyday lives, this is a book comprised of several interrelated stories. On the one hand, this is a story about teachers who care deeply about their students but are generally oblivious to the ways in which their words and behaviors reinforce dominant narratives about race and gender, constructing for their students a worldview in which race and gender do not matter despite their students’ lived experiences demonstrating otherwise. This is a story about dedicated, overworked teachers who are trying to keep their heads above water while meeting the myriad demands placed upon them in a climate of high-stakes testing. This is a story about the disconnect between those who mandate educational policy like superintendents and school boards and the teachers who are expected to implement those policies often with little or no input and few resources. This is ultimately a story, however, about how the institution of education itself operates in a “post-racial” and “post-gendered” society.

The Limits of Whiteness

Iranian Americans and the Everyday Politics of Race

Author: Neda Maghbouleh

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 1503603431

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 6736

When Roya, an Iranian American high school student, is asked to identify her race, she feels anxiety and doubt. According to the federal government, she and others from the Middle East are white. Indeed, a historical myth circulates even in immigrant families like Roya's, proclaiming Iranians to be the "original" white race. But based on the treatment Roya and her family receive in American schools, airports, workplaces, and neighborhoods—interactions characterized by intolerance or hate—Roya is increasingly certain that she is not white. In The Limits of Whiteness, Neda Maghbouleh offers a groundbreaking, timely look at how Iranians and other Middle Eastern Americans move across the color line. By shadowing Roya and more than 80 other young people, Maghbouleh documents Iranian Americans' shifting racial status. Drawing on never-before-analyzed historical and legal evidence, she captures the unique experience of an immigrant group trapped between legal racial invisibility and everyday racial hyper-visibility. Her findings are essential for understanding the unprecedented challenge Middle Easterners now face under "extreme vetting" and potential reclassification out of the "white" box. Maghbouleh tells for the first time the compelling, often heartbreaking story of how a white American immigrant group can become brown and what such a transformation says about race in America.

Sociology in Our Times: The Essentials

Author: Diana Kendall

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 0495598623

Category: Science

Page: 624

View: 7987

Accessible and up-to-date, the Seventh Edition of SOCIOLOGY IN OUR TIMES: THE ESSENTIALS, Seventh Edition, builds on the best of previous editions while offering new insights, learning tools, and opportunities to apply the content of each chapter to relevant sociological issues of the twenty-first century. Acclaimed in the field for being first to integrate race, class, and gender issues, Kendall continues her focus on diversity and inequality, emphasizing social consciousness and active participation in bettering the world around us. Compelling examples, a vivid writing style, and chapter themes grounded in timely social issues already familiar to students get students involved in sociology by showing them how they can make a difference in their own communities. Among its other changes, the Seventh Edition includes a new Sociology Works! feature; new assignable Reflect & Analyze questions that conclude selected features; two new photo essays, each with new assignable video activities; a vibrant new interior design; improved concept review tables; and more photos and illustrations, making this text the most up-to-date, applications-oriented introduction to sociology available. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.