Environmental Archaeology in Ireland

Author: Eileen M. Murphy,Nicki J. Whitehouse

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 1782974784

Category: Social Science

Page: 306

View: 7102

This edited volume of 16 papers provides an introduction to the techniques and methodologies, approaches and potential of environmental archaeology within Ireland. Each of the 16 invited contributions focuses on a particular aspect of environmental archaeology and include such specialist areas as radiocarbon dating, dendrochronology, palaeoentomology, human osteoarchaeology, palynology and geoarchaeology, thereby providing a comprehensive overview of environmental archaeology within an Irish context. The inclusion of pertinent case studies within each chapter will heighten awareness of the profusion of high standard environmental archaeological research that is currently being undertaken on Irish material. The book will provide a key text for students and practitioners of archaeology, archaeological science and palaeoecology.

Theory in Archaeology

A World Perspective

Author: Peter J. Ucko

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134843461

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 5862

Theory in Archaeology tackles important questions about the diversity in archaeological theory and practice which face the discipline in the 1990s. What is the relationship between theory and practice? How does `World' archaeological theory differ from `European'? Can one be a good practitioner without theory? This unique book brings together contributors from many different countries and continents to provide the first truly global perspective on archaeological theory. They examine the nature of material culture studies and look at problems of ethnicity, regionalism, and nationality. They consider, too, another fundamental of archaeological inquiry: can our research be objective, or must `the past' always be a relativistic construction? Theory in Archaeology is an important book whose authors bring together very different perceptions of the past. Its wide scope and interest will attract an international readership among students and academics alike.

The Archaeology of Early Medieval Ireland

Author: Nancy Edwards

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135951497

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 2267

In the first major work on the subject for over 30 years, Nancy Edwards provides a critical survey of the archaeological evidence in Ireland (c. 400-1200), introducing material from many recently discovered sites as well as reassessing the importance of earlier excavations. Beginning with an assessment of Roman influence, Dr Edwards then discusses the themse of settlement, food and farming, craft and technology, the church and art, concluding with an appraisal of the Viking impact. The archaeological evidence for the period is also particularly rich and wide-ranging and our knowledge is expanding repidly in the light of modern techniques of survey and excavation.

Settlement in the Irish Neolithic

New discoveries at the edge of Europe

Author: Jessica Smyth

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 1782977503

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 1199

The Irish Neolithic has been dominated by the study of megalithic tombs, but the defining element of Irish settlement evidence is the rectangular timber Early Neolithic house, the numbers of which have more than quadrupled in the last ten years. The substantial Early Neolithic timber house was a short-lived architectural phenomenon of as little as 90 years, perhaps like short-lived Early Neolithic long barrows and causewayed enclosures. This book explores the wealth of evidence for settlement and houses throughout the Irish Neolithic, in relation to Britain and continental Europe. More importantly it incorporates the wealth of new, and often unpublished, evidence from developer-led archaeological excavations and large grey-literature resources. The settlement evidence scattered across the landscape, and found as a result of developer-funded work, provides the social context for the more famous stone monuments that have traditionally shaped our views of the Neolithic in Ireland. It provides the first comprehensive review of the Neolithic settlement of Ireland, which enables a more holistic and meaningful understanding of the Irish Neolithic.

A History of Settlement in Ireland

Author: Terry Barry

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134674627

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 7422

A History of Settlement in Ireland provides a stimulating and thought-provoking overview of the settlement history of Ireland from prehistory to the present day. Particular attention is paid to the issues of settlement change and distribution within the contexts of: * environment * demography * culture. The collection goes further by setting the agenda for future research in this rapidly expanding area of academic interest. This volume will be essential reading for all those with an interest in the archaeology, history and social geography of Ireland.

The Archaeology of Medieval Ireland

Author: Terry B. Barry

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134982976

Category: Social Science

Page: 254

View: 7676

`This eagerly awaited book is an outstanding and right up-to-date summary of every excavation and investigation undertaken in Ireland into the earthworks, castles, ecclesiastical buildings and towns of the period from the arrival of the Anglo-Normans to the mid-sixteenth century...a most welcome synthesis and will be valued by the layperson, student and professional archaeologist, historical geographer and historian alike.' Archaeology Ireland

Man & Environment in Valencia Island

Author: Frank Mitchell

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780901714787

Category: Social Science

Page: 130

View: 1553

A vivid study of Valencia Island from the arrival of Stone Age people to the present day, drawing on ten years of intensive field research. 85 illustrations, including colour and black and white photographs. "The development of the island's archaeological record and the changes in the environment are assessed as part of an interwoven pattern... This small area shows in microcosm the archaeological complexity of the surviving evidence built up during the past nine thousand years of land exploitation in Ireland and will provide an excellent model for other research projects. For all those interested in our heritage, whether cultural or environmental, it is essential and rewarding reading." Eoin Grogan, Archaeology Ireland "The work, as one might expect of Frank Mitchell, is imbued with his characteristic enthusiasm...and is rich with his experience, insights and anecdote, as a Quaternary scientist and naturalist." R.J. Devoy, Irish Geography

Who Needs Experts?

Counter-mapping Cultural Heritage

Author: Dr John Schofield

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1472401786

Category: Social Science

Page: 276

View: 2755

Taking the significant Faro Convention on the Value of Cultural Heritage for Society (Council of Europe 2005) as its starting point, this book presents pragmatic views on the rise of the local and the everyday within cultural heritage discourse. Bringing together a range of case studies within a broad geographic context, it examines ways in which authorised or 'expert' views of heritage can be challenged, and recognises how everyone has expertise in familiarity with their local environment. The book concludes that local agenda and everyday places matter, and examines how a realignment of heritage practice to accommodate such things could usefully contribute to more inclusive and socially relevant cultural agenda.

Environmental Archaeology and the Social Order

Author: John G. Evans

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134409966

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 4109

Presenting a wide variety of case studies, ranging from the early Palaeolithic to Post-modernity, and from Europe to the Andes, West and East Africa, and the USA, Environmental Archaeology and the Social Order deals with both the theory and method of environmental archaeology. Including significant sections on Neanderthals, Palaeolithic mobiliary art and the origins of farming, as well as transhumance, climate as social construct, field survey and the place of documents in environmental research, Professor Evans interprets his findings in social constructionist terms, creating an important argument against the use of traditional materialist and processualist paradigms. This original and controversial volume sets a new agenda for the study and understanding of environmental archaeology, and will prove an informative and useful purchase.

Analytical Chemistry in Archaeology

Author: A. M. Pollard,C. M Batt,B. Stern,S. M. M. Young

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139459341

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 4755

This book is an introductory manual that explains the basic concepts of chemistry behind scientific analytical techniques and that reviews their application to archaeology. It explains key terminology, outlines the procedures to be followed in order to produce good data, and describes the function of the basic instrumentation required to carry out those procedures. The manual contains chapters on the basic chemistry and physics necessary to understand the techniques used in analytical chemistry, with more detailed chapters on Atomic Absorption, Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy, Neutron Activation Analysis, X-ray Flourescence, Electron Microscopy, Infra-red and Raman Spectroscopy, and Mass Spectrometry. Each chapter describes the operation of the instruments, some hints on the practicalities, and a review of the application of the technique to archaeology, including some case studies. With guides to further reading on the topic, it is an essential tool for practitioners, researchers and advanced students alike.

Ireland in Prehistory

Author: George Eogan,Mr George Eogan,Michael Herity

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134522789

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 4897

The authors examine Irish prehistory from the economic, sociological and artistic viewpoints enabling the reader to comprehend the vast amount of archaeological work accomplished in Ireland over the last twenty years.

Maritime Ireland

An Archaeology of Coastal Communities

Author: Aidan O'Sullivan,Colin Breen

Publisher: Tempus Pub Limited

ISBN: 9780752425092

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 5167

Since Ireland's first peoples arrived the sea has been of enormous cultural, economic and ideological significance in its long story. In this book, two of Ireland's leading maritime archaeologists explore rich and intriguing evidence for its past maritime resources and traditions and how these changed through prehistory, the Middle Ages and up until the present day. Using archaeological discoveries, linked with historical and environmental evidence, they reveal the often overlooked cultural heritage of Ireland's coastal landscapes in their European and Atlantic contexts.

Archaeology in Practice

A Student Guide to Archaeological Analyses

Author: Jane Balme,Alistair Paterson

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1405148861

Category: Social Science

Page: 464

View: 717

Archaeology in Practice: A Student Guide to ArchaeologicalAnalyses offers students in archaeology laboratory courses adetailed and invaluable how-to manual of archaeological methods andprovides insight into the breadth of modern archaeology. Written by specialists of material analyses, whose expertiserepresents a broad geographic range Includes numerous examples of applications of archaeologicaltechniques Organized by material types, such as animal bones, ceramics,stone artifacts, and documentary sources, or by themes, such asdating, ethics, and report writing Written accessibly and amply referenced to provide readers witha guide to further resources on techniques and theirapplications Enlivened by a range of boxed case studies throughout the maintext

Training and Practice for Modern Day Archaeologists

Author: John H. Jameson,James Eogan

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1461455294

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 846

In recent years, an important and encouraging development in the practice of archaeology and historical preservation has been the markedly increased number of collaborations among archaeologists, educators, preservation planners, and government managers to explore new approaches to archaeological and heritage education and training to accommodate globalization and the realities of the 21st century worldwide. But what is the collective experience of archaeologists and cultural heritage specialists in these arenas? Should we be encouraged, or discouraged, by national and international trends? In an attempt to answer these questions, this volume examines and gives representational examples of the respective approaches and roles of government, universities, and the private sector in meeting the educational/training needs and challenges of practicing archaeologists today.

Into the Ocean

Vikings, Irish, and Environmental Change in Iceland and the North

Author: Kristjan Ahronson

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442665084

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 4589

That Gaelic monasticism flourished in the early medieval period is well established. The “Irish School” penetrated large areas of Europe and contemporary authors describe North Atlantic travels and settlements. Across Scotland and beyond, Celtic-speaking communities spread into the wild and windswept north, marking hundreds of Atlantic settlements with carved and rock-cut sculpture. They were followed in the Viking Age by Scandinavians who dominated the Atlantic waters and settled the Atlantic rim. With Into the Ocean, Kristján Ahronson makes two dramatic claims: that there were people in Iceland almost a century before Viking settlers first arrived c. AD 870, and that there was a tangible relationship between the early Christian “Irish” communities of the Atlantic zone and the Scandinavians who followed them. Ahronson uses archaeological, paleoecological, and literary evidence to support his claims, analysing evidence ranging from pap place names in the Scottish islands to volcanic airfall in Iceland. An interdisciplinary analysis of a subject that has intrigued scholars for generations, Into the Ocean will challenge the assumptions of anyone interested in the Atlantic branch of the Celtic world.

Environmental Assessment in Practice

Author: Owen Harrop,Ashley Nixon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134729782

Category: Science

Page: 240

View: 2021

This text explains what constitutes good practice in applying environmental assessment as an environmental management tool. A wide range of case studies and other student text features are employed to demonstrate how the different methods, techniques and disciplines of environmental assessment can be used. The authors address the key concepts for environmental assessment procedures: methods for using E.A.; techniques for impact prediction and evaluation; environmental risk assessment; EA consultation and participation; project management; environmental statement review and post-project analysis; and strategic environmental assessment. Worldwide case studies include: gas pipelines, hydroelectric power plants, gold mining, river crossings, waste-to-energy plants and gravel extraction in England, Scotland, Ireland, Canada, the USA, Venezuela, the Netherlands, Iceland, Zambia, Zimbabwe, South Africa and Ghana.