The English Royal Family of America, from Jamestown to the American Revolution

Author: Michael A. Beatty

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786415588

Category: History

Page: 261

View: 4491

For about a century and a half after they arrived from England, America's first permanent colonists considered themselves to be English. They were proud of their heritage and loyal to their country. England's royal family truly was the royal family of America--until the era of the American Revolution, when the colonies fought for their independence from England and its rulers. Elizabeth I, James I, Charles I, Charles II, James II, William III and Mary II, Anne, George I, George II, and George III--the English royals who were also the royals of early America--are all covered in this work. It begins with Queen Elizabeth I, as it was during her rule that Sir Walter Ralegh established his settlements in America, and ends with King George III, as it was during his rule that the American Revolution began. A biographical sketch is provided for each royal and his or her spouse and legitimate children. Brief mention is made of mistresses and illegitimate children.

Marlborough and the War of the Spanish Succession

Author: Gerald Nicholson

Publisher: Ozymandias Press

ISBN: 1531280269

Category: History

Page: 234

View: 6881

As to the Duke of Marlborough . . . it was allowed by all men, nay even by France itself, that he was more than a match for all the generals of that nation. This he made appear beyond contradiction in the ten campaigns he made against them; during all which time it cannot be said that he ever slipped an opportunity of fighting when there was any probability of his coming at his enemy. And upon all occasions he concerted matters with so much judgment and forecast that he never fought a battle which he did not gain, nor laid siege to a town which he did not take...

Conquest and Union

Fashioning a British State 1485-1725

Author: Steven G. Ellis,Sarah Barber

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317894227

Category: History

Page: 348

View: 2351

The British Isles is a multi-national arena, but its history has traditionally been studied from a distinctively English -- often, indeed, London -- perspective. Now, however, the interweaving of the distinct but mutually-dependent histories of the four nations is at the heart of some of the liveliest historical research today. In this major contribution to that research, eleven leading scholars consider key aspects of the internal relations of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales in the early modern period, and the problems of accommodating different -- and resistant -- cultures to a single centralizing polity. The contributors are: Sarah Barber; Toby Barnard; Ciaran Brady; Keith M. Brown; Jane Dawson; Steven G. Ellis; David Hayton; Philip Jenkins; Alan Macinnes; Michael Mac Craith; and John Morrill.

Marlborough

Author: Gerald Nicholson

Publisher: Jovian Press

ISBN: 1537806378

Category: History

Page: 234

View: 6473

As to the Duke of Marlborough . . . it was allowed by all men, nay even by France itself, that he was more than a match for all the generals of that nation. This he made appear beyond contradiction in the ten campaigns he made against them; during all which time it cannot be said that he ever slipped an opportunity of fighting when there was any probability of his coming at his enemy. And upon all occasions he concerted matters with so much judgment and forecast that he never fought a battle which he did not gain, nor laid siege to a town which he did not take.

From Belloc to Churchill

Private Scholars, Public Culture, and the Crisis of British Liberalism, 1900-1939

Author: Victor Feske

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807861383

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 5103

Linking historiography and political history, Victor Feske addresses the changing role of national histories written in early twentieth-century Britain by amateur scholars Hilaire Belloc, Sidney and Beatrice Webb, J. L. and Barbara Hammond, G. M. Trevelyan, and Winston Churchill. These writers recast the nineteenth-century interpretation of British history at a time when both the nature of historical writing and the fortunes of Liberalism had begun to change. Before 1900, amateur historians writing for a wide public readership portrayed British history as a grand story of progress achieved through constitutional development. This 'Whig' interpretation had become the cornerstone of Liberal party politics. But the decline of Liberalism as a political force after the turn of the century, coupled with the rise of professional history written by academics and based on archival research, inspired change among a new generation of Liberal historians. The result was a refashioned Whig historiography, stripped of overt connections to contemporary political Liberalism, that attempted to preserve the general outlines of the traditional Whiggist narrative within the context of a broad history of consensus. This new formulation, says Feske, was more suited to the intellectual and political climate of the twentieth century. Originally published in 1996. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

The Duke of Queensberry and the Union of Scotland and England

James Douglas and the Act of Union of 1707

Author: Collins McKay

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 269

View: 9609

This book is the only biography of the Union Duke. It fully explores the principles and political life of Queensberry and the reasons for the Act of Union of 1707. It also addresses the issues of possible war between England and Scotland, the threat to the Hanoverian succession, and the constitutional and political battles fought out in the Scottish and English parliaments in 1695-1707. More importantly, this book is unique in that the research is based on the extensive archives at Drumlanrig castle (the home of the present Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry) to which no other historian of the Union has had recent access. The Duke of Queensberry and the Union of Scotland and England challenges the current historiography of the Union and provides a unique insight into the mind of Queensberry and other Scottish and English politicians with respect to the Union of 1707. This is an essential reference for all collections in European history as no other work on this subject deals with the development of Queensberry's political ideas and is based on the extensive primary sources available at Drumlanrig castle.

Marlborough

His Life and Times

Author: Winston Churchill

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Great Britain

Page: 1490

View: 6212