Culture and Imperialism

Author: Edward W. Said

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307829650

Category: Political Science

Page: 416

View: 2817

A landmark work from the author of Orientalism that explores the long-overlooked connections between the Western imperial endeavor and the culture that both reflected and reinforced it. In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, as the Western powers built empires that stretched from Australia to the West Indies, Western artists created masterpieces ranging from Mansfield Park to Heart of Darkness and Aida. Yet most cultural critics continue to see these phenomena as separate. Edward Said looks at these works alongside those of such writers as W. B. Yeats, Chinua Achebe, and Salman Rushdie to show how subject peoples produced their own vigorous cultures of opposition and resistance. Vast in scope and stunning in its erudition, Culture and Imperialism reopens the dialogue between literature and the life of its time. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Culture And Imperialism

Author: Edward W Said

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1448161908

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 1273

Following his profoundly influential study, Orientalism, Edward Said now examines western culture. From Jane Austen to Salman Rushdie, from Yeats to media coverage of the Gulf War, Culture and Imperialism is a broad, fierce and wonderfully readable account of the roots of imperialism in European culture.

Culture and Imperialism

Author: Edward W. Said

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780679750543

Category: History

Page: 380

View: 6012

Investigates the relationship between culture and the imperialism of the West through an examination of the concept of empire-building in Western literature

Imperialism and Postcolonialism

Author: Barbara Bush

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317870115

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 4156

This account of imperialism explores recent intellectual, theoretical and conceptual developments in imperial history, including interdisciplinary and post-colonial perspectives. Exploring the links between empire and domestic history, it looks at the interconnections and comparisons between empire and imperial power within wider developments in world history, covering the period from the Roman to the present American empire. The book begins by examining the nature of empire, then looks at continuity and change in the historiography of imperialism and theoretical and conceptual developments. It covers themes such as the relationship between imperialism and modernity, culture and national identity in Britain. Suitable for undergraduates taking courses in imperial and colonial history.

Taking Haiti

Military Occupation and the Culture of U.S. Imperialism, 1915-1940

Author: Mary A. Renda

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807862186

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 3818

The U.S. invasion of Haiti in July 1915 marked the start of a military occupation that lasted for nineteen years--and fed an American fascination with Haiti that flourished even longer. Exploring the cultural dimensions of U.S. contact with Haiti during the occupation and its aftermath, Mary Renda shows that what Americans thought and wrote about Haiti during those years contributed in crucial and unexpected ways to an emerging culture of U.S. imperialism. At the heart of this emerging culture, Renda argues, was American paternalism, which saw Haitians as wards of the United States. She explores the ways in which diverse Americans--including activists, intellectuals, artists, missionaries, marines, and politicians--responded to paternalist constructs, shaping new versions of American culture along the way. Her analysis draws on a rich record of U.S. discourses on Haiti, including the writings of policymakers; the diaries, letters, songs, and memoirs of marines stationed in Haiti; and literary works by such writers as Eugene O'Neill, James Weldon Johnson, Langston Hughes, and Zora Neale Hurston. Pathbreaking and provocative, Taking Haiti illuminates the complex interplay between culture and acts of violence in the making of the American empire.

Romantic Imperialism

Universal Empire and the Culture of Modernity

Author: Saree Makdisi

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521586047

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 3435

Analyses Romantic literary culture in the context of imperialism, capitalism, and the emergent culture of modernisation.

Cultures of United States Imperialism

Author: Amy Kaplan,Donald E. Pease

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822314134

Category: History

Page: 672

View: 3677

Cultures of United States Imperialism represents a major paradigm shift that will remap the field of American Studies. Pointing to a glaring blind spot in the basic premises of the study of American culture, leading critics and theorists in cultural studies, history, anthropology, and literature reveal the "denial of empire" at the heart of American Studies. Challenging traditional definitions and periodizations of imperialism, this volume shows how international relations reciprocally shape a dominant imperial culture at home and how imperial relations are enacted and contested within the United States. Drawing on a broad range of interpretive practices, these essays range across American history, from European representations of the New World to the mass media spectacle of the Persian Gulf War. The volume breaks down the boundary between the study of foreign relations and American culture to examine imperialism as an internal process of cultural appropriation and as an external struggle over international power. The contributors explore how the politics of continental and international expansion, conquest, and resistance have shaped the history of American culture just as much as the cultures of those it has dominated. By uncovering the dialectical relationship between American cultures and international relations, this collection demonstrates the necessity of analyzing imperialism as a political or economic process inseparable from the social relations and cultural representations of gender, race, ethnicity, and class at home. Contributors. Lynda Boose, Mary Yoko Brannen, Bill Brown, William Cain, Eric Cheyfitz, Vicente Diaz, Frederick Errington, Kevin Gaines, Deborah Gewertz, Donna Haraway, Susan Jeffords, Myra Jehlen, Amy Kaplan, Eric Lott, Walter Benn Michaels, Donald E. Pease, Vicente Rafael, Michael Rogin, José David Saldívar, Richard Slotkin, Doris Sommer, Gauri Viswanathan, Priscilla Wald, Kenneth Warren, Christopher P. Wilson

Imperialism and Popular Culture

Author: John M. MacKenzie

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719018688

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 4215

Popular culture is invariably a vehicle for the dominant ideas of its age. Never was this more true than in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, when it reflected the nationalist and imperialist ideologies current throughout Europe. When they were being entertained or educated the British basked in their imperial glory and developed a powerful notion of their own superiority. This book examines the various media through which nationalist ideas were conveyed in late Victorian and Edwardian times--in the theatre, "ethnic" shows, juvenile literature, education, and the iconography of popular art. Several chapters look beyond the first world war when the most popular media, cinema and broadcasting, continued to convey an essentially late nineteenth-century world view, while government agencies like the Empire Marketing Board sought to convince the public of the economic value of empire. Youth organizations, which had propagated imperialist and militarist attitudes before the war, struggled to adapt to the new internationalist climate.

Exceptional State

Contemporary U.S. Culture and the New Imperialism

Author: Ashley Dawson,Malini Johar Schueller

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822338208

Category: History

Page: 311

View: 7779

DIVExplores the role culture plays in legitimating, unsettling, and contesting America's aggressively interventionist foreign policy since 9/11./div

Orientalism

Author: Edward W. Said

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0804153868

Category: Social Science

Page: 432

View: 5504

More than three decades after its first publication, Edward Said's groundbreaking critique of the West's historical, cultural, and political perceptions of the East has become a modern classic. In this wide-ranging, intellectually vigorous study, Said traces the origins of "orientalism" to the centuries-long period during which Europe dominated the Middle and Near East and, from its position of power, defined "the orient" simply as "other than" the occident. This entrenched view continues to dominate western ideas and, because it does not allow the East to represent itself, prevents true understanding. Essential, and still eye-opening, Orientalism remains one of the most important books written about our divided world. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Japan's Total Empire

Manchuria and the Culture of Wartime Imperialism

Author: Louise Young

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520219342

Category: History

Page: 487

View: 9141

At the heart of the empire Japan won and then lost in the Pacific War was Manchukuo, a puppet state created in Northeast China in 1932. Not unlike India for the British, Manchukuo was the crucible and symbol of empire for the Japanese. In this book, the first social and cultural history of Japan's construction of Manchuria, Louise Young studies how people at home imagined, experienced, and built the empire that so threatened the world.

The Sense of the People

Politics, Culture and Imperialism in England, 1715-1785

Author: Kathleen Wilson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521635271

Category: History

Page: 460

View: 8383

This exciting study demonstrates the central role of "the people," the empire, and the citizen in eighteenth-century English popular politics. Pioneering in its focus on provincial towns, its attention to the imperial contexts of urban politics and its use of a rich and diverse array of sources--from newspapers, prints and plays to pottery and tea-cloths--it shows how the wide-ranging political culture of English towns attuned ordinary men and women to the issues of state power and thus enabled them to stake their own claims in national and imperial affairs.

Rule of Darkness

British Literature and Imperialism, 1830-1914

Author: Patrick Brantlinger

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801467020

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 336

View: 3770

A major contribution to the cultural and literary history of the Victorian age, Rule of Darkness maps the complex relationship between Victorian literary forms, genres, and theories and imperialist, racist ideology. Critics and cultural historians have usually regarded the Empire as being of marginal importance to early and mid-Victorian writers. Patrick Brantlinger asserts that the Empire was central to British culture as a source of ideological and artistic energy, both supported by and lending support to widespread belief in racial superiority, the need to transform "savagery" into "civilization," and the urgency of promoting emigration. Rule of Darkness brings together material from public records, memoirs, popular culture, and canonical literature. Brantlinger explores the influence of the novels of Captain Frederick Marryat, pioneer of British adolescent adventure fiction, and shows the importance of William Makepeace Thackeray's experience of India to his novels. He treats a number of Victorian best sellers previously ignored by literary historians, including the Anglo-Indian writer Philip Meadows Taylor's Confessions of a Thug and Seeta. Brantlinger situates explorers' narratives and travelogues by such famous author-adventurers as David Livingstone and Sir Richard Burton in relation to other forms of Victorian and Edwardian prose. Through readings of works by Arthur Conan Doyle, Joseph Conrad, H. Rider Haggard, Rudyard Kipling, John Hobson, and many others, he considers representations of Africa, India, and other non-British parts of the world in both fiction and nonfiction. The most comprehensive study yet of literature and imperialism in the early and mid-Victorian years, Rule of Darkness offers, in addition, a revisionary interpretation of imperialism as a significant factor in later British cultural history, from the 1880s to World War I. It is essential reading for anyone concerned with Victorian culture and society and, more generally, with the relationship between Victorian writers and imperialism, 'and between racist ideology and patterns of domination in modern history.

Digital Platforms, Imperialism and Political Culture

Author: Dal Yong Jin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317509056

Category: Social Science

Page: 194

View: 5186

In the networked twenty-first century, digital platforms have significantly influenced capital accumulation and digital culture. Platforms, such as social network sites (e.g. Facebook), search engines (e.g. Google), and smartphones (e.g. iPhone), are increasingly crucial because they function as major digital media intermediaries. Emerging companies in non-Western countries have created unique platforms, controlling their own national markets and competing with Western-based platform empires in the global markets. The reality though is that only a handful of Western countries, primarily the U.S., have dominated the global platform markets, resulting in capital accumulation in the hands of a few mega platform owners. This book contributes to the platform imperialism discourse by mapping out several core areas of platform imperialism, such as intellectual property, the global digital divide, and free labor, focusing on the role of the nation-state alongside transnational capital.

Beyond Cultural Imperialism

Globalization, Communication and the New International Order

Author: Peter Golding,Phil Harris

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 9781446223550

Category: Communication

Page: 272

View: 7610

Moving beyond notions of cultural imperialism, this book furthers our understanding of the implications of global media culture and politics in the 1990s. Leading scholars from a range of fields bring different perspectives to bear on the role of the state, the range of culture beyond the media, the contribution of international organizations, and the potential for resistance and alternatives. They reflect on the New World International Communications Order' as delineated since the 1970s, and examine its changing nature. Throughout, they connect analysis of the flows and forces which form the world media and communications with the fundamental themes of social science, and illuminate the ways in which underlying questions of inequality, power and control reappear within new media environments.

Negotiating with Imperialism

The Unequal Treaties and the Culture of Japanese Diplomacy

Author: Michael R. Auslin

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674020313

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 5606

Japan's modern international history began in 1858 with the signing of the "unequal" commercial treaty with the United States. Over the next fifteen years, Japanese diplomacy was reshaped to respond to the Western imperialist challenge. "Negotiating with Imperialism" is the first book to explain the emergence of modern Japan through this early period of treaty relations. Michael Auslin dispels the myth that the Tokugawa "bakufu" was diplomatically incompetent. Refusing to surrender to the West's power, "bakufu" diplomats employed negotiation as a weapon to defend Japan's interests. Tracing various visions of Japan's international identity, Auslin examines the evolution of the culture of Japanese diplomacy. Further, he demonstrates the limits of nineteenth-century imperialist power by examining the responses of British, French, and American diplomats. After replacing the Tokugawa in 1868, Meiji leaders initially utilized bakufu tactics. However, their 1872 failure to revise the treaties led them to focus on domestic reform as a way of maintaining independence and gaining equality with the West. In a compelling analysis of the interplay among assassinations, Western bombardment of Japanese cities, fertile cultural exchange, and intellectual discovery, Auslin offers a persuasive reading of the birth of modern Japan and its struggle to determine its future relations with the world.

Imperialism and the Origins of Mexican Culture

Author: Colin M. MacLachlan

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 067428643X

Category: History

Page: 330

View: 1511

Their empire unmatched in military and cultural might, the Aztecs were poised on the brink of a golden age, when the arrival of the Spanish changed everything. Colin MacLachlan explains why Mexico is culturally Mestizo while ethnically Indian and why Mexicans remain orphaned from their indigenous heritage—the adopted children of European history.

Power, Politics, and Culture

Interviews with Edward W. Said

Author: Edward Said

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408846233

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 5043

No single book has encompassed the vast scope of Edward Said's erudition quite like Power, Politics and Culture - a collection of his interviews from the last three decades. In these twenty-nine interviews, Said addresses everything from Palestine to Pavarotti, from his nomadic upbringing under colonial rule to his politically active and often controversial life in America, and reflects on Austen, Beckett, Conrad, Naipaul, Mahfouz and Rushdie as well as fellow critics Bloom, Derrida and Foucault. Said speaks here with his usual candour, acuity and eloquence - confirming that he was in his lifetime among the truly most important intellects of our century.

Hong Kong and British Culture, 1945-97

Author: Mark Hampton

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1526116723

Category:

Page: 248

View: 5790

This book examines the British cultural engagement with Hong Kong in the second half of the twentieth century. It shows how the territory fit unusually within Britain's decolonisation narratives and served as an occasional foil for examining Britain's own culture during a period of perceived stagnation and decline. Drawing on a wide range of archival and published primary sources, Hong Kong and British culture, 1945-97 investigates such themes as Hong Kong as a site of unrestrained capitalism, modernisation, and good government, as well as an arena of male social and sexual opportunity. It also examines the ways in which Hong Kong Chinese embraced British culture, and the competing predictions that British observers made concerning the colony's return to Chinese sovereignty. An epilogue considers the enduring legacy of British colonialism. This book will be essential reading for historians of Hong Kong, British decolonisation, and Britain's culture of declinism.