Countercultures and Popular Music

Author: Sheila Whiteley,Jedediah Sklower

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131715892X

Category: Music

Page: 316

View: 6371

’Counterculture’ emerged as a term in the late 1960s and has been re-deployed in more recent decades in relation to other forms of cultural and socio-political phenomena. This volume provides an essential new academic scrutiny of the concept of ’counterculture’ and a critical examination of the period and its heritage. Recent developments in sociological theory complicate and problematise theories developed in the 1960s, with digital technology, for example, providing an impetus for new understandings of counterculture. Music played a significant part in the way that the counterculture authored space in relation to articulations of community by providing a shared sense of collective identity. Not least, the heady mixture of genres provided a socio-cultural-political backdrop for distinctive musical practices and innovations which, in relation to counterculture ideology, provided a rich experiential setting in which different groups defined their relationship both to the local and international dimensions of the movement, so providing a sense of locality, community and collective identity.

Music and Cyberliberties

Author: Patrick Burkart

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 0819570508

Category: Music

Page: 200

View: 5308

Musicians and music fans are at the forefront of cyberliberties activism, a movement that has tried to correct the imbalances that imperil the communal and ritualistic sharing and distribution of music. In Music and Cyberliberties, Patrick Burkart tracks the migration of music advocacy and anti-major label activism since the court defeat of Napster and the ascendancy of the so-called Celestial Jukebox model of music e-commerce, which sells licensed access to music. Music and Cyberliberties identifies the groups—alternative and radical media activists, culture jammers, hackers, netlabels, and critical legal scholars—who are pushing back against the “copyright grab” by major labels for the rights and privileges that were once enjoyed by artists and fans. Burkart reflects on the emergence of peer-to-peer networking as a cause célèbre that helped spark the movement, and also lays out the next stages of development for the Celestial Jukebox that would quash it. By placing the musical activist groups into the larger context of technology and new social movement theory, Music and Cyberliberties offers an exciting new way of understanding the technological and social changes we confront daily.

Rock, Counterculture and the Avant-Garde, 1966äóñ1970

How the Beatles, Frank Zappa and the Velvet Underground Defined an Era

Author: Doyle Greene

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 1476624038

Category: Music

Page: 232

View: 4903

The convergence of rock music, counterculture politics and avant-garde aesthetics in the late 1960s underscored the careers of the Beatles, Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention, and the Velvet Underground. This book examines these artists’ relationships to the historical avant-garde (Artaud, Brecht, Dada) and neo–avant-garde (Warhol, Pop Art, minimalism), considering their work in light of debates about modernism versus postmodernism. The author analyzes the performers’ use of dissonance and noise within popular music, the role of social commentary and controversial topics in songs, and the experiments with concert and studio performance. Albums discussed include Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, The White Album, Freak Out!, We’re Only in It for the Money, The Velvet Underground and Nico and White Light/White Heat, as well as John Lennon’s collaborations with Yoko Ono, the Zappa-produced Trout Mask Replica by Captain Beefheart and the Magic Band, and Nico’s The Marble Index.

Popular Music in America: And The Beat Goes On

Author: Michael Campbell

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 0495505307

Category: Music

Page: 384

View: 3755

This refreshingly current, best-selling text provides a highly readable, chronological examination of the roots and history of American popular music, from 1840 to the present. The focus is on basic music fundamentals as well as the elements of each style; the heritage and diversity of popular music; the underlying kinship among its many styles; and the evolution of popular music from minstrel show music to rap and alternative. The text’s opening chapter introduces students to the elements of popular music through a familiar musical example. The text is available with an exclusive, high-quality heritage 3-CD set that contains each selection discussed in depth in the first two thirds of the book: from the early twentieth century through the 1960s. The remaining examples may be accessed via online iTunes and Rhapsody playlists (or from the student’s music collection). When packaged with the text, the CDs are available at a substantial discount. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Religion and Change in Modern Britain

Author: Linda Woodhead,Rebecca Catto

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136475001

Category: Religion

Page: 424

View: 6913

This book offers a fully up-to-date and comprehensive guide to religion in Britain since 1945. A team of leading scholars provide a fresh analysis and overview, with a particular focus on diversity and change. They examine: relations between religious and secular beliefs and institutions the evolving role and status of the churches the growth and ‘settlement’ of non-Christian religious communities the spread and diversification of alternative spiritualities religion in welfare, education, media, politics and law theoretical perspectives on religious change. The volume presents the latest research, including results from the largest-ever research initiative on religion in Britain, the AHRC/ESRC Religion and Society Programme. Survey chapters are combined with detailed case studies to give both breadth and depth of coverage. The text is accompanied by relevant photographs and a companion website.

The Music of Counterculture Cinema

A Critical Study of 1960s and 1970s Soundtracks

Author: Mathew J. Bartkowiak,Yuya Kiuchi

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786475420

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 216

View: 9622

Films produced in late 1960s and early 1970s America--along with later films focusing on that period--continue to frame our understanding of the counterculture era. The popular and experimental music of the day is central to the counterculture narrative on film, from the utopian Monterey Pop (1968) to the disenchantment of Gimme Shelter (1970). But the musical side of the movement was not monolithic, and a study of contemporary film soundtracks reveals a great deal of complexity. The coinciding struggles to define collective and individual identities based on race, class, gender and generation are well documented in the music of counterculture cinema.

Blerwytirhwng?

The Place of Welsh Pop Music

Author: Sarah Hill

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9780754658986

Category: Music

Page: 236

View: 3212

In the 1960s, Welsh-language popular music emerged as a vehicle for mobilizing a geographically dispersed community into political action. As the decades progressed, Welsh popular music developed beyond its acoustic folk roots, adopting the various styles of contemporary popular music, and ultimately gaining the cultural self-confidence to compete in the Anglo-American mainstream market. The resulting tensions necessitate the understanding of Welsh pop as part of a much larger cultural process. By surveying the development of Welsh-language popular music from 1945-2000, 'Blerwytirhwng?' The Place of Welsh Pop Music examines those moments of crisis in Welsh cultural life which signalled a burgeoning sense of national identity, challenged paradigms of linguistic belonging, and out of which emerged new expressions of Welshness.

Sounds of Rebellion

Music in the 1960s

Author: Britannica Educational Publishing

Publisher: Britannica Educational Publishing

ISBN: 1615309136

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 208

View: 3506

The music of the 1960s is perhaps as memorable as the historical milestones of the era. Timeless bands, such as the Beatles and the Rolling Stones, emerged from England while the U.S. saw the rise of such folk musicians as Bob Dylan and the explosion of soul, with such legends as Aretha Franklin and James Brown providing the soundtrack to the fight for civil rights. Accessible text captures the extraordinary sounds of this unforgettable period through profiles of its greatest musical talents, placing their stories in social and cultural context.

Music of the Counterculture Era

Author: James E. Perone

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313326899

Category: History

Page: 226

View: 8219

Presents a history of popular music during the 1960s and 1970s and weighs its influence on the art, politics, and culture of the era.

Rocking the Classics

English Progressive Rock and the Counterculture

Author: Edward Macan

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195098870

Category: Music

Page: 290

View: 5931

This is the first authoritative study of the music, history and culture of progressive rock, a genre remembered for its virtuoso guitar solos and massive stage shows. Among the bands covered are Jethro Tull, Genesis, Yes, and Pink Floyd.

The Republic of Rock

Music and Citizenship in the Sixties Counterculture

Author: Michael J. Kramer

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195384865

Category: History

Page: 292

View: 5418

In his 1967 megahit "San Francisco," Scott McKenzie sang of "people in motion" coming from all across the country to San Francisco, the white-hot center of rock music and anti-war protests. At the same time, another large group of young Americans was also in motion, less eagerly, heading for the jungles of Vietnam. Now, in The Republic of Rock, Michael Kramer draws on new archival sources and interviews to explore sixties music and politics through the lens of these two generation-changing places--San Francisco and Vietnam. From the Acid Tests of Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters to hippie disc jockeys on strike, the military's use of rock music to "boost morale" in Vietnam, and the forgotten tale of a South Vietnamese rock band, The Republic of Rock shows how the musical connections between the City of the Summer of Love and war-torn Southeast Asia were crucial to the making of the sixties counterculture. The book also illustrates how and why the legacy of rock music in the sixties continues to matter to the meaning of citizenship in a global society today. Going beyond clichéd narratives about sixties music, Kramer argues that rock became a way for participants in the counterculture to think about what it meant to be an American citizen, a world citizen, a citizen-consumer, or a citizen-soldier. The music became a resource for grappling with the nature of democracy in larger systems of American power both domestically and globally. For anyone interested in the 1960s, popular music, and American culture and counterculture, The Republic of Rock offers new insight into the many ways rock music has shaped our ideas of individual freedom and collective belonging.

Counterculture Kaleidoscope

Musical and Cultural Perspectives on Late Sixties San Francisco

Author: Nadya Zimmerman

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 047203572X

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 2890

A bold reconsideration of the meaning of 1960s San Francisco counterculture

Imagine Nation

The American Counterculture of the 1960's and 70's

Author: Peter Braunstein,Michael William Doyle

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136058907

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 8999

Amidst the recent flourishing of Sixties scholarship, Imagine Nation is the first collection to focus solely on the counterculture. Its fourteen provocative essays seek to unearth the complexity and rediscover the society-changing power of significant movements and figures.

The Space Between the Notes

Rock and the Counter-Culture

Author: Sheila Whiteley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134916620

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 152

View: 6111

The Space Between the Notes examines a series of relationships central to sixties counter-culture: psychedelic coding and rock music, the Rolling Stones and Charles Manson, the Beatles and the `Summers of love', Jimi Hendrix and hallucinogenics, Pink Floyd and space rock. Sheila Whiteley combines musicology and socio-cultural analysis to illuminate this terrain, illustrating her argument with key recordings of the time: Cream's She Walks Like a Bearded Rainbow, Hendrix's Hey Joe, Pink Floyd's Set the Controls For the Heat of the Sun, The Move's I Can Hear the Grass Grow, among others. The appropriation of progressive rock by young urban dance bands in the 1990s make this study of sixties and seventies counter-culture a timely intervention. It will inform students of popular music and culture, and spark off recognition and interest from those that lived through the period as well as a new generation that draw inspiration from its iconography and sensibilities today.

Democracy of Sound

Music Piracy and the Remaking of American Copyright in the Twentieth Century

Author: Alex Sayf Cummings

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199858225

Category: History

Page: 257

View: 7106

Democracy of Sound tells the story of the pirates, radicals, jazzbos, Deadheads, and DJs who challenged the record industry for control of recorded sound throughout the twentieth century. A political and cultural history, it shows how the primacy of "intellectual property" gradually eclipsed an American political tradition that was suspicious of monopolies and favored free competition.

Heavy Metal

Controversies and Countercultures

Author: Titus Hjelm,Keith Kahn-Harris,Mark LeVine

Publisher: Equinox

ISBN: 9781845539412

Category: Music

Page: 250

View: 4818

The aim of this anthology is to analyse the relationship between heavy metal and society within a global context.

Sounds French

Globalization, Cultural Communities and Pop Music, 1958-1980

Author: Jonathyne Briggs

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190266643

Category: Music

Page: 248

View: 597

Sounds French examines the history of popular music in France between the arrival of rock and roll in 1958 and the collapse of the first wave of punk in 1980, and the connections between musical genres and concepts of community in French society. During this period, scholars have tended to view the social upheavals associated with postwar reconstruction as part of debates concerning national identity in French culture and politics, a tendency that developed from political figures' and intellectuals' concerns with French national identity. In this book, author Jonathyne Briggs reorients the scholarship away from an exclusive focus on national identity and instead towards an investigation of other identities that develop as a result of the increased globalization of culture. Popular music, at once individual and communal, fixed and plastic, offers an illuminating window into such transformations in social structures through the ways in which musicians, musical consumers, and critical intermediaries re-imagined themselves as part of novel cultural communities, whether local, national, or supranational in nature. Briggs argues that national identity was but one of a panoply of identities in flux during the postwar period in France, demonstrating that the development of hybridized forms of popular music provided the French with a method for expressing and understanding that flux. Drawing upon an array of printed and aural sources, including music publications, sound recordings, record sleeves, biographies, and cultural criticism, Sounds French is an essential new look at popular music in postwar France.

Brutality Garden

Tropicália and the Emergence of a Brazilian Counterculture

Author: Christopher Dunn

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469615703

Category: Music

Page: 276

View: 2755

In the late 1960s, Brazilian artists forged a watershed cultural movement known as Tropicalia. Music inspired by that movement is today enjoying considerable attention at home and abroad. Few new listeners, however, make the connection between this music and the circumstances surrounding its creation, the most violent and repressive days of the military regime that governed Brazil from 1964 to 1985. With key manifestations in theater, cinema, visual arts, literature, and especially popular music, Tropicalia dynamically articulated the conflicts and aspirations of a generation of young, urban Brazilians. Focusing on a group of musicians from Bahia, an impoverished state in northeastern Brazil noted for its vibrant Afro-Brazilian culture, Christopher Dunn reveals how artists including Caetano Veloso, Gilberto Gil, Gal Costa, and Tom Ze created this movement together with the musical and poetic vanguards of Sao Paulo, Brazil's most modern and industrialized city. He shows how the tropicalists selectively appropriated and parodied cultural practices from Brazil and abroad in order to expose the fissure between their nation's idealized image as a peaceful tropical "garden" and the daily brutality visited upon its citizens.

1968 in America

Music, Politics, Chaos, Counterculture, and the Shaping of a Generation

Author: Charles Kaiser

Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.

ISBN: 0802193242

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 6955

From assassinations to student riots, this is “a splendidly evocative account of a historic year—a year of tumult, of trauma, and of tragedy” (Arthur Schlesinger Jr.). In the United States, the 1960s were a period of unprecedented change and upheaval—but the year 1968 in particular stands out as a dramatic turning point. Americans witnessed the Tet offensive in Vietnam; the shocking assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Kennedy; and the chaos at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. At the same time, a young generation was questioning authority like never before—and popular culture, especially music, was being revolutionized. Largely based on unpublished interviews and documents—including in-depth conversations with Eugene McCarthy and Bob Dylan, among many others, and the late Theodore White’s archives, to which the author had sole access—1968 in America is a fascinating social history, and the definitive study of a year when nothing could be taken for granted. “Kaiser aims to convey not only what happened during the period but what it felt like at the time. Affecting touches bring back powerful memories, including strong accounts of the impact of the Tet offensive and of the frenzy aroused by Bobby Kennedy’s race for the presidency.” —The New York Times Book Review