A Torch Kept Lit

Great Lives of the Twentieth Century

Author: William F. Buckley (Jr.)

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 1101906219

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 323

View: 4162

Buckley drew on his unrivaled gifts in what he liked to call 'the controversial arts' to mourn, celebrate, or seek eternal mercy for the men and women who touched his life and the nation; to conjure their personalities, recall memorable moments, herald their greatness; or to remind readers of why a given individual, even with the grace that death can uniquely confer, should be remembered as evil. At all points, these remembrances reflect Buckley's singular voice, with its elegant touch and mordant humor, and lend to the lives of the departed a final tribute consistent with their own careers, lives, and accomplishments.

Buckley

William F. Buckley Jr. and the Rise of American Conservatism

Author: Carl T. Bogus

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1608193551

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 416

View: 6660

"This is an insightful book that will please anyone interested in midcentury American history and politics. Anyone serious about political philosophy will learn from it. Highly recommended.Â?? -Library Journal (starred review) William F. Buckley Jr. was the foremost architect of the conservative movement that transformed American politics between the 1960s and the end of the century. When Buckley launched National Review in 1955, conservatism was a beleaguered, fringe segment of the Republican Party. Three decades later Ronald Reagan-who credited National Review with shaping his beliefs-was in the White House. Buckley and his allies devised a new-model conservatism that replaced traditional ideals of Edmund Burke with a passionate belief in the free market; religious faith; and an aggressive stance on foreign policy. Buckley's TV show, Firing Line, and his campaign for mayor of New York City made him a celebrity; his wit and zest for combat made conservatism fun. But Buckley was far more than a controversialist. Deploying his uncommon charm, shrewdly recruiting allies, quashing ideological competitors, and refusing to compromise on core principles, he almost single-handedly transformed conservatism from a set of retrograde attitudes into a revolutionary force.

Saving the Queen

Author: William F. Buckley

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1504018494

Category: Fiction

Page: 278

View: 2255

When the Queen’s life is threatened, it takes a remarkable CIA agent to save her Blackford Oakes has never been afraid of obeying orders. During the war, it’s what kept him alive. When he leaves the air force for Yale, Oakes is studious, temperate, and polite. He knows how to follow rules—but he also knows the secret to breaking them: Never tell a little lie when a big lie will do. He’s exactly the man the CIA is looking for. Just before Oakes graduates, an old friend recruits him to work for the Company. His military background, knowledge of French, and family in London make Oakes a perfect choice for the most glamorous role the CIA has to offer: deep-cover agent. When his 1st assignment reveals Soviet espionage inside Buckingham Palace and a plot against the young Queen, Oakes will throw the rulebook out the window. Saving the Queen is the 1st book in the Blackford Oakes Mysteries, but you may enjoy reading the series in any order.

Miles Gone By

A Literary Autobiography

Author: William F. Buckley

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1596983248

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 594

View: 1808

Here is a unique collection of fifty years of essays chosen to form an unconventional autobiography and capstone to his remarkable career as the conservative writer par excellence. Included are essays that capture Buckley's joyful boyhood and family life; his years as a conservative firebrand at Yale; the life of a young army officer; his love of wine and sailing; memories of his favourite friends; the great influences of music and religion; a life in politics; and exploring the beauty, diversity, and exactitude of the English language.

Atlantic High

Author: William F. Buckley

Publisher: RosettaBooks

ISBN: 9780795311406

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 266

View: 5254

Atlantic High is ostensibly the tale of Buckley’s 1980 voyage across the Atlantic Ocean, a recond of Buckley’s meditations on the pleasures of sailing and the importance of good company. Not surprisingly, as much thought seems to have gone into stocking the wine cellar as to charting the route across the high seas. This is an essay on appreciation, and a chance for Buckley to exercise his unique sense of humor and share his spirited point of view. fter a leisurely aside-filled discussion of other trips, Buckley sets out with several close friends and a photographer to make his second trans-Atlantic crossing. The first crossing provided the basis for his popular book, Airborne. When asked by People magazine why he chose to make the crossing for a second time, Buckley replied with characteristic drollness, “the wedding night is never enough.” It is a passion for sailing that motivates Buckley and enlivens these pages. The book ranges easily from observation to speculation, from humorous character sketch to wry editorial commentary. It is peppered with anecdotes, including one in which Buckley, armed with a hacksaw, breaks into a boatyard to steal his own boat back from an unscrupulous repairman. In another, President Reagan calls to discuss a conflict that is brewing in Africa, but all Buckley can think about is the weather ahead of him and his crew. From the Mujeres Islands to Fiji to Bermuda, to Sao Miguel and Gibraltar and beyond, the reader is treated to Buckley’s observations of the places he visits and the people he encounters. A work as hard to categorize as Buckley himself, Atlantic High offers a real glimpse into Buckley’s philosophical meanderings as well as the good life on the high seas.

A Man and His Presidents

The Political Odyssey of William F. Buckley Jr.

Author: Alvin Felzenberg

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300166893

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 8344

A new understanding of the man who changed the face of American politics William F. Buckley Jr. is widely regarded as the most influential American conservative writer, activist, and organizer in the postwar era. In this nuanced biography, Alvin Felzenberg sheds light on little-known aspects of Buckley’s career, including his role as back-channel adviser to policy makers, his intimate friendship with both Ronald and Nancy Reagan, his changing views on civil rights, and his break with George W. Bush over the Iraq War. Felzenberg demonstrates how Buckley conveyed his message across multiple platforms and drew upon his vast network of contacts, his personal charm, his extraordinary wit, and his celebrity status to move the center of political gravity in the United States closer to his point of view. Including many rarely seen photographs, this account of one of the most compelling personalities of American politics will appeal to conservatives, liberals, and even the apolitical.

Getting It Right

Author: William F. Buckley

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1621571394

Category: Fiction

Page: 311

View: 1355

Getting It Right is the story of Kara and Alex, half-sisters who have never met―one the product of an abusive foster-care setting, the other of dysfunctional privilege. Haunted by crippling memories, Kara falls for the wrong men, tries to help her foster-care siblings suffering from PTSD, and longs for the father and half-sister she only knows from a photograph. Alex, meanwhile, struggles to keep her younger sisters out of trouble, her mother sane, and her marketing business afloat. Now Alex has a new responsibility: from his hospital bed, her father tasks her with finding Kara, the mixed-race child he abandoned. Alex is stunned to learn of Kara's existence but reluctantly agrees. To make things more complicated, Kara loves a married man whom the FBI is pursuing for insider trading. When Alex eventually finds her half-sister, she becomes embroiled in Kara's dangers, which threaten to drag them both down. If Kara doesn't help the FBI, she could face prosecution and possible incarceration, and if Alex can't persuade Kara to meet their father, she will let him down during the final days of his life. Set in Harlem, the Bronx, and the wealthy community of Bedford, New York, during two weeks in March, Getting It Right explores grit and resilience, evolving definitions of race and family, and the ultimate power of redemption and forgiveness.

Open to Debate

How William F. Buckley Put Liberal America on the Firing Line

Author: Heather Hendershot

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062430475

Category: Political Science

Page: 432

View: 6388

A unique and compelling portrait of William F. Buckley as the champion of conservative ideas in an age of liberal dominance, taking on the smartest adversaries he could find while singlehandedly reinventing the role of public intellectual in the network television era. When Firing Line premiered on American television in 1966, just two years after Barry Goldwater’s devastating defeat, liberalism was ascendant. Though the left seemed to have decisively won the hearts and minds of the electorate, the show’s creator and host, William F. Buckley—relishing his role as a public contrarian—made the case for conservative ideas, believing that his side would ultimately win because its arguments were better. As the founder of the right’s flagship journal, National Review, Buckley spoke to likeminded readers. With Firing Line, he reached beyond conservative enclaves, engaging millions of Americans across the political spectrum. Each week on Firing Line, Buckley and his guests—the cream of America’s intellectual class, such as Tom Wolfe, Noam Chomsky, Norman Mailer, Henry Kissinger, and Milton Friedman—debated the urgent issues of the day, bringing politics, culture, and economics into American living rooms as never before. Buckley himself was an exemplary host; he never appealed to emotion and prejudice; he engaged his guests with a unique and entertaining combination of principle, wit, fact, a truly fearsome vocabulary, and genuine affection for his adversaries. Drawing on archival material, interviews, and transcripts, Open to Debate provides a richly detailed portrait of this widely respected ideological warrior, showing him in action as never before. Much more than just the story of a television show, Hendershot’s book provides a history of American public intellectual life from the 1960s through the 1980s—one of the most contentious eras in our history—and shows how Buckley led the way in drawing America to conservatism during those years.

The Reagan I Knew

Author: William F. Buckley Jr.

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0786726660

Category: Political Science

Page: 304

View: 1333

No two people were more important to American conservatism in the postwar era than William F. Buckley Jr. and Ronald Reagan. Buckley's writings provided the intellectual underpinnings, while Reagan brought the conservative movement into the White House. They met in 1961 when Reagan introduced a speech by Buckley. When nobody could turn on the microphone, Reagan climbed out a window, walked along a ledge to the locked control room, broke in, and flipped the correct switch. Buckley later described this moment as “a nifty allegory of Reagan's approach to foreign policy: the calm appraisal of a situation, the willingness to take risks, and then the decisive moment leading to lights and sound.” For over thirty years, the two men shared jokes and vacations, advised each other on politics, and counseled each other's children. The Reagan I Knew traces the evolution of an extraordinary friendship between two American political giants.

Buckley and Mailer: The Difficult Friendship That Shaped the Sixties

Author: Kevin M. Schultz

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393248232

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 799

A lively chronicle of the 1960s through the surprisingly close and incredibly contentious friendship of its two most colorful characters. William F. Buckley, Jr., and Norman Mailer were the two towering intellectual figures of the 1960s, and they lived remarkably parallel lives. Both became best-selling authors in their twenties (with God and Man at Yale and The Naked and the Dead); both started hugely influential papers (National Review and the Village Voice); both ran for mayor of New York City; both were noted for their exceptional wit and venom; and both became the figurehead of their respective social movements (Buckley on the right, Mailer on the left). Indeed, Buckley and Mailer argued vociferously and publicly about every major issue of their time: civil rights, feminism, the counterculture, Vietnam, the Cold War. But behind the scenes, the two were close friends and trusted confidantes. In Buckley and Mailer, historian Kevin M. Schultz delves into their personal archives to tell the rich story of their friendship, their arguments, and the tumultuous decade they did so much to shape. Here is the entertaining and deeply American story of what Mailer himself called a "difficult friendship": from their debate before the Floyd Patterson–Sonny Liston heavyweight fight in 1962 to their failed mayoral campaigns, to their confrontation at Truman Capote’s Black-and-White Ball, to their starring roles in the central events of the ’60s, including the giant antiwar rally in Berkeley, the March on the Pentagon, and the national political conventions in Miami and Chicago. Through it all, Schultz charts their friendship, whether sailing together off the coast of Connecticut, celebrating rave reviews and grousing about lousy ones, and defending each other's decisions privately even as they attack each other’s positions publicly. Brimming with Buckley and Mailer's own thoughts from their personal diaries and letters, Buckley and Mailer also features cameos by other leading figures of the time, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Barry Goldwater, Robert F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Gloria Steinem, and Gore Vidal. Schultz delivers a fresh chronicle of the '60s and its long aftermath as well as an enormously engaging work of narrative history that explores these extraordinary figures' contrasting visions of what America was and what it could be.

The Unmaking of a Mayor

Author: William F. Buckley Jr.

Publisher: Encounter Books

ISBN: 1594038481

Category: History

Page: 488

View: 1411

John V. Lindsay was elected mayor of New York City in 1965. But that year’s mayoral campaign will forever be known as the Buckley campaign. “As a candidate,” Joseph Alsop conceded, “Buckley was cleverer and livelier than either of his rivals.” And Murray Kempton concluded that “The process which coarsens every other man who enters it has only refined Mr. Buckley.” The Unmaking of a Mayor is a time capsule of the political atmosphere of America in the spring of 1965, diagnosing the multitude of ills that plagued New York and other major cities: crime, narcotics, transportation, racial bias, mismanagement, taxes, and the problems of housing, police, and education. Buckley’s nimble dissection of these issues constitutes an excellent primer of conservative thought. A good pathologist, Buckley shows that the diseases afflicting New York City in 1965 were by no means of a unique strain, and compared them with issues that beset the country at large. Buckley offers a prescient vision of the Republican Party and America’s two-party system that will be of particular interest to today’s conservatives. The Unmaking of a Mayor ends with a wistful glance at what might have been in 1965—and what might yet be.

Airborne

A Sentimental Journey

Author: William Frank Buckley

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Atlantic Ocean

Page: 252

View: 3611


Spytime

The Undoing of James Jesus Angleton

Author: William F. Buckley, Jr.

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780156011242

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 4779

A fictional portrait of the life and exploits of American spymaster James Jesus Angleton, the founder of U.S. counterintelligence at the end of the Second World War, describes his espionage work, from World War II to the end of the Cold War, when his efforts to expose a traitor led to his own downfall. Reprint. 15,000 first printing.

Buckley vs. Vidal

The Historic 1968 ABC News Debates

Author: William F. Buckley,Gore Vidal

Publisher: BookBaby

ISBN: 1942531117

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 3204

Conservative icon William F. Buckley Jr. and liberal author Gore Vidal exploded onto the political scene during the presidential conventions of 1968 when they debated 11 times on ABC News as a part of the network's convention coverage. Their debates were fiery and combative and they infamously blew up at each other during their penultimate debate in Chicago. The debates, the subject of the new documentary film "Best of Enemies," have not been shown or transcribed in their entirety since the original airings in 1968. Devault-Graves Digital Editions exclusively brings you the complete, uncensored transcripts in all their highly readable glory. The book also features an eloquent and informative introduction by one of the directors of "Best of Enemies," author Robert Gordon. Fans of Buckley and Vidal will not want to miss the delicious vituperation on display. Students of debate will find no better guide to the art of the verbal fencing than Buckley vs. Vidal.

Losing Mum and Pup

A Memoir

Author: Christopher Buckley

Publisher: Emblem Editions

ISBN: 0771017316

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 264

View: 4202

“I had more or less resolved not to write a book about my parents. But I’m a writer, and when the universe hands you material like this, not writing about it amounts either to waste or a conscious act of evasion.” So begins award-winning satirist Christopher Buckley in the most personal and transcendent work of his life, the tragicomic true story of the year in which both of his parents died. In twelve months between 2007 and 2008, Buckley coped with the passing of his father, William F. Buckley, the father of the modern conservative movement, and his mother, Patricia Taylor Buckley, one of New York’s most glamorous and colorful socialites. He was their only child and their relationship was close and complicated. Writes Buckley: “They were not — with respect to every other set of loving, wonderful parents in the world — your typical mom and dad.” As Buckley tells the story of their final year together, he takes readers on a surprisingly entertaining tour through hospitals, funeral homes, and memorial services, capturing the heartbreaking and disorienting feeling of becoming a fifty-five-year-old orphan. Buckley maintains his sense of humor by recalling the words of Oscar Wilde: “To lose one parent may be regarded as a misfortune. To lose both looks like carelessness.” Christopher Buckley offers consolation, wit, and warmth to those coping with the death of a parent, while telling a unique personal story of life with legends. From the Hardcover edition.

Qiddushin

A Preliminary Translation and Explanation

Author: Jacob Neusner

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226576862

Category: Religion

Page: 267

View: 1299

Edited by the acclaimed scholar Jacob Neusner, this thirty-five volume English translation of the Talmud Yerushalmi has been hailed by the Jewish Spectator as a "project...of immense benefit to students of rabbinic Judaism."

Engine of Impact

Essentials of Strategic Leadership in the Nonprofit Sector

Author: William F. Meehan III,Kim Starkey Jonker

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 1503603628

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 280

View: 3423

We are entering a new era—an era of impact. The largest intergenerational transfer of wealth in history will soon be under way, bringing with it the potential for huge increases in philanthropic funding. Engine of Impact shows how nonprofits can apply the principles of strategic leadership to attract greater financial support and leverage that funding to maximum effect. As Good to Great author Jim Collins writes in his foreword, this book offers "a detailed roadmap of disciplined thought and action for turning a good nonprofit into one that can achieve great impact at scale." William F. Meehan III and Kim Starkey Jonker identify seven essential components of strategic leadership that set high-achieving organizations apart from the rest of the nonprofit sector. Together, these components form an "engine of impact"—a system that organizations must build, tune, and fuel if they hope to make a real difference in the world. Drawing on decades of teaching, advising, grantmaking, and research, Meehan and Jonker provide an actionable guide that executives, staff, board members, and donors can use to jumpstart their own performance and to achieve extraordinary results for their organization. Along with setting forth best practices using real-world examples, the authors outline common management challenges faced by nonprofits, showing how these challenges differ from those faced by for-profit businesses in important and often-overlooked ways. By offering crucial insights on the fundamentals of nonprofit management, this book will help leaders equip their organizations to fire on all cylinders and unleash the full potential of the nonprofit sector. Visit www.engineofimpact.org for additional information.

Conversations with Norman Mailer

Author: Norman Mailer,Michael Lennon

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9780878053520

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 396

View: 1450

Mailer discusses his writing, the craft of fiction, literary criticism, his career as an author, biography, and modern society

God and Man at Yale

The Superstitions of 'Academic Freedom'

Author: William F. Buckley

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1596988037

Category: Education

Page: 240

View: 6077

“For God, for country, and for Yale…in that order,” William F. Buckley Jr. wrote as the dedication of his monumental work—a compendium of knowledge that still resonates within the halls of the Ivy League university that tried to cover up its political and religious bias. Buckley’s harsh assessment of his alma mater divulged the reality behind the institution’s wholly secular education, even within the religion department and divinity school. Unabashed, one former Yale student details the importance of Christianity and heralds the modern conservative movement in his preeminent tell-all, God and Man at Yale: The Superstitions of “Academic Freedom.”