Conquest

Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide

Author: Andrea Smith

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822374811

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 961

In this revolutionary text, prominent Native American studies scholar and activist Andrea Smith reveals the connections between different forms of violence—perpetrated by the state and by society at large—and documents their impact on Native women. Beginning with the impact of the abuses inflicted on Native American children at state-sanctioned boarding schools from the 1880s to the 1980s, Smith adroitly expands our conception of violence to include the widespread appropriation of Indian cultural practices by whites and other non-Natives; environmental racism; and population control. Smith deftly connects these and other examples of historical and contemporary colonialism to the high rates of violence against Native American women—the most likely to suffer from poverty-related illness and to survive rape and partner abuse. Smith also outlines radical and innovative strategies for eliminating gendered violence.

Native Americans and the Christian Right

The Gendered Politics of Unlikely Alliances

Author: Andrea Smith

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822341635

Category: Political Science

Page: 356

View: 2600

DIVArgues that previous accounts of religious and political activism in the Native American community fail to account for the variety of positions held by this community./div

Sharing Our Stories of Survival

Native Women Surviving Violence

Author: Sarah Deer,Bonnie Clairmont,Carrie A. Martell

Publisher: Rowman Altamira

ISBN: 9780759111257

Category: Social Science

Page: 362

View: 998

Sharing Our Stories of Survival is a comprehensive treatment of the socio-legal issues that arise in the context of violence against native women—written by social scientists, writers, poets, and survivors of violence.

Theorizing Native Studies

Author: Audra Simpson

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 082237661X

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 5252

This important collection makes a compelling argument for the importance of theory in Native studies. Within the field, there has been understandable suspicion of theory stemming both from concerns about urgent political issues needing to take precedence over theoretical speculations and from hostility toward theory as an inherently Western, imperialist epistemology. The editors of Theorizing Native Studies take these concerns as the ground for recasting theoretical endeavors as attempts to identify the larger institutional and political structures that enable racism, inequities, and the displacement of indigenous peoples. They emphasize the need for Native people to be recognized as legitimate theorists and for the theoretical work happening outside the academy, in Native activist groups and communities, to be acknowledged. Many of the essays demonstrate how Native studies can productively engage with others seeking to dismantle and decolonize the settler state, including scholars putting theory to use in critical ethnic studies, gender and sexuality studies, and postcolonial studies. Taken together, the essays demonstrate how theory can serve as a decolonizing practice. Contributors. Christopher Bracken, Glen Coulthard, Mishuana Goeman, Dian Million, Scott Morgensen, Robert Nichols, Vera Palmer, Mark Rifkin, Audra Simpson, Andrea Smith, Teresia Teaiwa

Injustice in Indian Country

Jurisdiction, American Law, and Sexual Violence Against Native Women

Author: Amy L. Casselman

Publisher: Peter Lang Gmbh, Internationaler Verlag Der Wissenschaften

ISBN: 9781433131097

Category: Criminal jurisdiction

Page: 151

View: 5499

Living at the intersection of multiple identities in the United States can be dangerous. This is especially true for Native women who live on the more than 56 million acres that comprise America’s Indian Country - the legal term for American Indian reservations and other land held in trust for Native people. Today, due to a complicated system of criminal jurisdiction, non-Native Americans can commit crimes against American Indians in much of Indian Country with virtual impunity. This has created what some call a modern day «hunting ground» in which Native women are specifically targeted by non-Native men for sexual violence. In this urgent and timely book, author Amy L. Casselman exposes the shameful truth of how the American government has systematically divested Native nations of the basic right to protect the people in their own communities. A problem over 200 years in the making, Casselman highlights race and gender in federal law to challenge the argument that violence against Native women in Indian country is simply collateral damage from a complex but necessary legal structure. Instead, she demonstrates that what’s happening in Indian country is part of a violent colonial legacy - one that has always relied on legal and sexual violence to disempower Native communities as a whole.

Color of Violence

The INCITE! Anthology

Author: INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822373440

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 3565

The editors and contributors to Color of Violence ask: What would it take to end violence against women of color? Presenting the fierce and vital writing of organizers, lawyers, scholars, poets, and policy makers, Color of Violence radically repositions the antiviolence movement by putting women of color at its center. The contributors shift the focus from domestic violence and sexual assault and map innovative strategies of movement building and resistance used by women of color around the world. The volume's thirty pieces—which include poems, short essays, position papers, letters, and personal reflections—cover violence against women of color in its myriad forms, manifestations, and settings, while identifying the links between gender, militarism, reproductive and economic violence, prisons and policing, colonialism, and war. At a time of heightened state surveillance and repression of people of color, Color of Violence is an essential intervention. Contributors. Dena Al-Adeeb, Patricia Allard, Lina Baroudi, Communities Against Rape and Abuse (CARA), Critical Resistance, Sarah Deer, Eman Desouky, Ana Clarissa Rojas Durazo, Dana Erekat, Nirmala Erevelles, Sylvanna Falcón, Rosa Linda Fregoso, Emi Koyama, Elizabeth "Betita" Martínez, maina minahal, Nadine Naber, Stormy Ogden, Julia Chinyere Oparah, Beth Richie, Andrea J. Ritchie, Dorothy Roberts, Loretta J. Ross, s.r., Puneet Kaur Chawla Sahota, Renee Saucedo, Sista II Sista, Aishah Simmons, Andrea Smith, Neferti Tadiar, TransJustice, Haunani-Kay Trask, Traci C. West, Janelle White

Violence Against Indigenous Women

Literature, Activism, Resistance

Author: Allison Hargreaves

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 1771122501

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 773

Violence against Indigenous women in Canada is an ongoing crisis, with roots deep in the nation’s colonial history. Despite numerous policies and programs developed to address the issue, Indigenous women continue to be targeted for violence at disproportionate rates. What insights can literature contribute where dominant anti-violence initiatives have failed? Centring the voices of contemporary Indigenous women writers, this book argues for the important role that literature and storytelling can play in response to gendered colonial violence. Indigenous communities have been organizing against violence since newcomers first arrived, but the cases of missing and murdered women have only recently garnered broad public attention. Violence Against Indigenous Women joins the conversation by analyzing the socially interventionist work of Indigenous women poets, playwrights, filmmakers, and fiction-writers. Organized as a series of case studies that pair literary interventions with recent sites of activism and policy-critique, the book puts literature in dialogue with anti-violence debate to illuminate new pathways toward action. With the advent of provincial and national inquiries into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, a larger public conversation is now underway. Indigenous women’s literature is a critical site of knowledge-making and critique. Violence Against Indigenous Women provides a foundation for reading this literature in the context of Indigenous feminist scholarship and activism and the ongoing intellectual history of Indigenous women’s resistance.

The Invasion of Indian Country in the Twentieth Century

Author: Donald L. Fixico

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 1457111667

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 1080

The Invasion of Indian Country in the Twentieth Century, Second Edition is updated through the first decade of the twenty-first century and contains a new chapter challenging Americans--Indian and non-Indian--to begin healing the earth. This analysis of the struggle to protect not only natural resources but also a way of life serves as an indispensable tool for students or anyone interested in Native American history and current government policy with regard to Indian lands or the environment.

The Beginning and End of Rape

Confronting Sexual Violence in Native America

Author: Sarah Deer

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780816696338

Category: Law

Page: 232

View: 8018

Despite what major media sources say, violence against Native women is not an epidemic. An epidemic is biological and blameless. Violence against Native women is historical and political, bounded by oppression and colonial violence. This book, like all of Sarah Deer's work, is aimed at engaging the problem head-on--and ending it. The Beginning and End of Rape collects and expands the powerful writings in which Deer, who played a crucial role in the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act in 2013, has advocated for cultural and legal reforms to protect Native women from endemic sexual violence and abuse. Deer provides a clear historical overview of rape and sex trafficking in North America, paying particular attention to the gendered legacy of colonialism in tribal nations--a truth largely overlooked or minimized by Native and non-Native observers. She faces this legacy directly, articulating strategies for Native communities and tribal nations seeking redress. In a damning critique of federal law that has accommodated rape by destroying tribal legal systems, she describes how tribal self-determination efforts of the twenty-first century can be leveraged to eradicate violence against women. Her work bridges the gap between Indian law and feminist thinking by explaining how intersectional approaches are vital to addressing the rape of Native women. Grounded in historical, cultural, and legal realities, both Native and non-Native, these essays point to the possibility of actual and positive change in a world where Native women are systematically undervalued, left unprotected, and hurt. Deer draws on her extensive experiences in advocacy and activism to present specific, practical recommendations and plans of action for making the world safer for all.

Masculindians

Conversations about Indigenous Manhood

Author: Sam McKegney

Publisher: Univ. of Manitoba Press

ISBN: 0887554423

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 8153

What does it mean to be an Indigenous man today? Between October 2010 and May 2013, Sam McKegney conducted interviews with leading Indigenous artists, critics, activists, and elders on the subject of Indigenous manhood. In offices, kitchens, and coffee shops, and once in a car driving down the 401, McKegney and his participants tackled crucial questions about masculine self-worth and how to foster balanced and empowered gender relations. Masculindians captures twenty of these conversations in a volume that is intensely personal, yet speaks across generations, geography, and gender boundaries. As varied as their speakers, the discussions range from culture, history, and world view to gender theory, artistic representations, and activist interventions. They speak of possibility and strength, of beauty and vulnerability. They speak of sensuality, eroticism, and warriorhood, and of the corrosive influence of shame, racism, and violence. Firmly grounding Indigenous continuance in sacred landscapes, interpersonal reciprocity, and relations with other-than-human kin, these conversations honour and embolden the generative potential of healthy Indigenous masculinities.

Indigenous American Women

Decolonization, Empowerment, Activism

Author: Devon Abbott Mihesuah

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803282865

Category: Social Science

Page: 246

View: 9312

Oklahoma Choctaw scholar Devon Abbott Mihesuah offers a frank and absorbing look at the complex, evolving identities of American Indigenous women today, their ongoing struggles against a centuries-old legacy of colonial disempowerment, and how they are seen and portrayed by themselves and others. ø Mihesuah first examines how American Indigenous women have been perceived and depicted by non-Natives, including scholars, and by themselves. She then illuminates the pervasive impact of colonialism and patriarchal thought on Native women?s traditional tribal roles and on their participation in academia. Mihesuah considers how relations between Indigenous women and men across North America continue to be altered by Christianity and Euro-American ideologies. Sexism and violence against Indigenous women has escalated; economic disparities and intratribal factionalism and ?culturalism? threaten connections among women and with men; and many women suffer from psychological stress because their economic, religious, political, and social positions are devalued. ø In the last section, Mihesuah explores how modern American Indigenous women have empowered themselves tribally, nationally, or academically. Additionally, she examines the overlooked role that Native women played in the Red Power movement as well as some key differences between Native women "feminists" and "activists."

Maze of Injustice

The Failure to Protect Indigenous Women from Sexual Violence in the USA

Author: Amnesty International

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Human rights

Page: 100

View: 9742

More than one in three Native American or Alaska Native women will be raped at some point in their lives. Most do not seek justice because they known they will be met with inaction or indifference. As one support worker said, "Women don't report because it doesn't make a difference. Why report when you are just going to be revictimized?" Sexual violence against women is not only a criminal or social issue, it is a human rights abuse. This report unravels some of the reasons why Indigenous women in the USA are at such risk of sexual violence and why survivors are so frequently denied justice. Chronic under-resourcing of law enforcement and health services, confusion over jurisdiction, erosion of tribal authority, discrimination in law and practice, and indifference -- all these factors play a part. None of this is inevitable or irreversible. The voices of Indigenous women throughout this report send a message of courage and hope that change can and will happen.

Sister Nations

Native American Women Writers on Community

Author: Heid Ellen Erdrich,Laura Tohe

Publisher: Minnesota Historical Society

ISBN: 9780873516976

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 230

View: 7676

A captivating anthology of fiction, prose, and poetry that celebrates the rich diversity of writing by Native American women today.

Compelled to Crime

The Gender Entrapment of Battered, Black Women

Author: Beth Richie

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317325419

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

View: 6184

First published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Pregnancy and Power

A Short History of Reproductive Politics in America

Author: Rickie Solinger

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814798284

Category: History

Page: 303

View: 7483

Winner of the 2013 Bullough Award presented by the Foundation for the Scientific Study of Sexuality The term “intersex” evokes diverse images, typically of people who are both male and female or neither male nor female. Neither vision is accurate. The millions of people with an intersex condition, or DSD (disorder of sex development), are men or women whose sex chromosomes, gonads, or sex anatomy do not fit clearly into the male/female binary norm. Until recently, intersex conditions were shrouded in shame and secrecy: many adults were unaware that they had been born with an intersex condition and those who did know were advised to hide the truth. Current medical protocols and societal treatment of people with an intersex condition are based upon false stereotypes about sex, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, and disability, which create unique challenges to framing effective legal claims and building a strong cohesive movement. InIntersexuality and the Law, Julie A. Greenberg examines the role that legal institutions can play in protecting the rights of people with an intersex condition. She also explores the relationship between the intersex movement and other social justice movements that have effectively utilized legal strategies to challenge similar discriminatory practices. She discusses the feasibility of forming effective alliances and developing mutually beneficial legal arguments with feminists, LGBT organizations, and disability rights advocates to eradicate the discrimination suffered by these marginalized groups.

Native America and the Question of Genocide

Author: Alex Alvarez

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442225823

Category: Social Science

Page: 222

View: 1718

This provocative book asks whether or not the Native populations of North America experienced genocide. Drawing on examples such as the Sand Creek Massacre and the Long Walk of the Navajo, the author shows the diversity of Native American experiences postcontact and uncovers the complex realities of this difficult period in American history.

Silent Victims

Hate Crimes Against Native Americans

Author: Barbara Perry

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816525966

Category: Social Science

Page: 155

View: 3365

Hate crimes against Native Americans are a common occurrence, Barbara Perry reveals, although most go unreported. In this eye-opening book, Perry shines a spotlight on these acts, which are often hidden in the shadows of crime reports. She argues that scholarly and public attention to the historical and contemporary victimization of Native Americans as tribes or nations has blinded both scholars and citizens alike to the victimization of individual Native Americans. It is these acts against individuals that capture her attention. Silent Victims is a unique contribution to the literature on hate crime. Because most extant literature treats hate crimesÑeven racial violenceÑrather generically, this work breaks new ground with its findings. For this book, Perry interviewed nearly 300 Native Americans and gathered additional data in three geographic areas: the Four Corners region of the U.S. Southwest, the Great Lakes, and the Northern Plains. In all of these locales, she found that bias-related crime oppresses and segregates Native Americans. Perry is well aware of the history of colonization in North America and its attendant racial violence. She argues that the legacy of violence today can be traced directly to the genocidal practices of early settlers, and she adds valuable insights into the ways in which ÒIndiansÓ have been constructed as the Other by the prevailing culture. PerryÕs interviews with Native Americans recount instances of appalling treatment, often at the hands of law enforcement officials. In her conclusion, Perry draws from her research and interviews to suggest ways in which Native Americans can be empowered to defend themselves against all forms of racist victimization.

The New Resource Wars

Native and Environmental Struggles Against Multinational Corporations

Author: Al Gedicks

Publisher: Black Rose Books Ltd.

ISBN: 9781551640006

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 270

View: 1833


Our Bodies, Ourselves for the New Century

A Book by and for Women

Author: N.A

Publisher: Touchstone Books

ISBN: 9780684842318

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 780

View: 4222

The first major revision of the 1984 classic guide to women's health includes information on such topics as breast cancer treatment options, preventing and living with AIDS, and new developments in contraception and reproductive technology. Reprint. 100,000 first printing.

In the Hands of the Great Spirit

The 20,000-Year History of American Indians

Author: Jake Page

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0684855771

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 1830

Presents a complete history of the American Indians, drawing on historical documents, archaeological artifacts, and oral legends to profile early societies, clarify misconceptions, and describe recent revivals.