Closing the Courthouse Door

How Your Constitutional Rights Became Unenforceable

Author: Erwin Chemerinsky

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300211589

Category: Law

Page: 280

View: 7407

A leading legal scholar explores how the constitutional right to seek justice has been restricted by the Supreme Court The Supreme Court's decisions on constitutional rights are well known and much talked about. But individuals who want to defend those rights need something else as well: access to courts that can rule on their complaints. And on matters of access, the Court's record over the past generation has been almost uniformly hostile to the enforcement of individual citizens' constitutional rights. The Court has restricted who has standing to sue, expanded the immunity of governments and government workers, limited the kinds of cases the federal courts can hear, and restricted the right of habeas corpus. Closing the Courthouse Door, by the distinguished legal scholar Erwin Chemerinsky, is the first book to show the effect of these decisions: taken together, they add up to a growing limitation on citizens' ability to defend their rights under the Constitution. Using many stories of people whose rights have been trampled yet who had no legal recourse, Chemerinsky argues that enforcing the Constitution should be the federal courts' primary purpose, and they should not be barred from considering any constitutional question.

The Conservative Assault on the Constitution

Author: Erwin Chemerinsky

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781451606355

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 4035

Over the last few decades, the Supreme Court and the federal appellate courts have undergone a dramatic shift to the right, the result of a determined effort by right-wing lawmakers and presidents to reinterpret the Constitution by reshaping the judiciary. Conservative activist justices have narrowed the scope of the Constitution, denying its protections to millions of Americans, exactly as the lawmakers who appointed and confirmed these jurists intended. Basic long-standing principles of constitutional law have been overturned by the Rehnquist and Roberts courts. As distinguished law professor and constitutional expert Erwin Chemerinsky demonstrates in this invaluable book, these changes affect the lives of every American. As a result of political pressure from conservatives and a series of Supreme Court decisions, our public schools are increasingly separate and unequal, to the great disadvantage of poor and minority students. Right-wing politicians and justices are dismantling the wall separating church and state, allowing ever greater government support for religion. With the blessing of the Supreme Court, absurdly harsh sentences are being handed down to criminal defendants, such as life sentences for shoplifting and other petty offenses. Even in death penalty cases, defendants are being denied the right to competent counsel at trial, and as a result innocent people have been convicted and sentenced to death. Right-wing politicians complain that government is too big and intrusive while at the same time they are only too happy to insert the government into the most intimate aspects of the private lives of citizens when doing so conforms to conservative morality. Conservative activist judges say that the Constitution gives people an inherent right to own firearms but not to make their own medical decisions. In some states it is easier to buy an assault rifle than to obtain an abortion. Nowhere has the conservative assault on the Constitution been more visible or more successful than in redefining the role of the president. From Richard Nixon to George W. Bush, conservatives have sought to significantly increase presidential power. The result in recent years has been unprecedented abuses, including indefinite detentions, illegal surveillance, and torture of innocent people. Finally, access to the courts is being restricted by new rulings that deny legal protections to ordinary Americans. Fewer lawsuits alleging discrimination in employment are heard; fewer people are able to sue corporations or governments for injuries they have suffered; and even when these cases do go to trial, new restrictions limit damages that plaintiffs can collect. The first step in reclaiming the protections of the Constitution, says Chemerinsky, is to recognize that right-wing justices are imposing their personal prejudices, not making neutral decisions about the scope of the Constitution, as they claim, or following the "original meaning" of the Constitution. Only then do we stand a chance of reclaiming our constitutional liberties from a rigid ideological campaign that has transformed our courts and our laws. Only then can we return to a constitutional law that advances freedom and equality.

Enhancing Government

Federalism for the 21st Century

Author: Erwin Chemerinsky

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 0804763135

Category: Political Science

Page: 312

View: 9009

Federalism—the division of power between national and state governments—has been a divisive issue throughout American history. Conservatives argued in support of federalism and states' rights to oppose the end of slavery, the New Deal, and desegregation. In the 1990s, the Rehnquist Court used federalism to strike down numerous laws of public good, including federal statutes requiring the clean up of nuclear waste and background checks for gun ownership. Now the Roberts Court appears poised to use federalism and states' rights to limit federal power even further. In this book, Erwin Chemerinsky passionately argues for a different vision: federalism as empowerment. He analyzes and criticizes the Supreme Court's recent conservative trend, and lays out his own challenge to the Court to approach their decisions with the aim of advancing liberty and enhancing effective governance. While the traditional approach has been about limiting federal power, an alternative conception would empower every level of government to deal with social problems. In Chemerinsky's view, federal power should address national problems like environmental protection and violations of civil rights, while state power can be strengthened in areas such as consumer privacy and employee protection. The challenge for the 21st century is to reinvent American government so that it can effectively deal with enduring social ills and growing threats to personal freedom and civil liberties. Increasing the chains on government—as the Court and Congress are now doing in the name of federalism—is exactly the wrong way to enter the new century. But, an empowered federalism, as Chemerinsky shows, will profoundly alter the capabilities and promise of U.S. government and society.

Unfit for Democracy

The Roberts Court and the Breakdown of American Politics

Author: Stephen E. Gottlieb

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814733018

Category: Law

Page: 416

View: 9523

Asked if the country was governed by a republic or a monarchy, Benjamin Franklin replied, “A republic, if you can keep it.” Since its founding, Americans have worked hard to nurture and protect their hard-won democracy. And yet few consider the role of constitutional law in America’s survival. In Unfit for Democracy, Stephen Gottlieb argues that constitutional law without a focus on the future of democratic government is incoherent—illogical and contradictory. Approaching the decisions of the Roberts Court from political science, historical, comparative, and legal perspectives, Gottlieb highlights the dangers the court presents by neglecting to interpret the law with an eye towards preserving democracy. A senior scholar of constitutional law, Gottlieb brings a pioneering will to his theoretical and comparative criticism of the Roberts Court. The Roberts Court decisions are not examined in a vacuum but instead viewed in light of constitutional politics in India, South Africa, emerging Eastern European nations, and others. While constitutional decisions abroad have contributed to both the breakdown and strengthening of democratic politics, decisions in the Roberts Court have aggravated the potential destabilizing factors in democratic governments. Ultimately, Unfit for Democracy calls for an interpretation of the Constitution that takes the future of democracy seriously. Gottlieb warns that the Roberts Court’s decisions have hurt ordinary Americans economically, politically, and in the criminal process. They have damaged the historic American melting pot, increased the risk of anti-democratic paramilitaries, and clouded the democratic future.

The Case Against the Supreme Court

Author: Erwin Chemerinsky

Publisher: Penguin Books

ISBN: 0143128000

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 3975

Both historically and in the present, the Supreme Court has largely been a failure In this devastating book, Erwin Chemerinsky—“one of the shining lights of legal academia” (The New York Times)—shows how, case by case, for over two centuries, the hallowed Court has been far more likely to uphold government abuses of power than to stop them. Drawing on a wealth of rulings, some famous, others little known, he reviews the Supreme Court's historic failures in key areas, including the refusal to protect minorities, the upholding of gender discrimination, and the neglect of the Constitution in times of crisis, from World War I through 9/11. No one is better suited to make this case than Chemerinsky. He has studied, taught, and practiced constitutional law for thirty years and has argued before the Supreme Court. With passion and eloquence, Chemerinsky advocates reforms that could make the system work better, and he challenges us to think more critically about the nature of the Court and the fallible men and women who sit on it.

Constitutional Torts and the War on Terror

Author: James E. Pfander

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190495286

Category:

Page: 288

View: 2761

Constitutional Torts and the War on Terror examines the judicial response to human rights claims arising from the Bush Administration's war on terror. Despite widespread agreement that the Administration's program of extraordinary rendition, prolonged detention, and "enhanced" interrogation was torture by another name, not a single federal appellate court has confirmed an award of damages to the program's victims. The silence of the federal courts leaves victims without redress and the constitutional limits on government action undefined. Many of the suits seeking redress have been based on the landmark 1971 Supreme Court decision in Bivens v. Six Unknown Named Agents of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics. This book traces the history of common law accountability, the rise of Bivens claims, and the post-Bivens history of constitutional tort litigation. After evaluating the failure of Bivens litigation arising from the war on terror, the book considers and rejects the arguments that have been put forward to explain and justify judicial silence. The book provides the Supreme Court with the tools needed to rethink its Bivens jurisprudence. Rather than treating the overseas national security context as disabling, modern federal courts should take a page from the nineteenth century, presume the viability of tort litigation, and proceed to the merits. Only by doing so can the federal courts ensure redress for victims and prevent future Administrations from using torture as an instrument of official policy.

Free Speech on Campus

Author: Erwin Chemerinsky,Howard Gillman

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300231865

Category: Political Science

Page: 216

View: 9868

Can free speech coexist with an inclusive campus environment? Hardly a week goes by without another controversy over free speech on college campuses. On one side, there are increased demands to censor hateful, disrespectful, and bullying expression and to ensure an inclusive and nondiscriminatory learning environment. On the other side are traditional free speech advocates who charge that recent demands for censorship coddle students and threaten free inquiry. In this clear and carefully reasoned book, a university chancellor and a law school dean—both constitutional scholars who teach a course in free speech to undergraduates—argue that campuses must provide supportive learning environments for an increasingly diverse student body but can never restrict the expression of ideas. This book provides the background necessary to understanding the importance of free speech on campus and offers clear prescriptions for what colleges can and can’t do when dealing with free speech controversies.

We the People

A Progressive Reading of the Constitution for the Twenty-First Century

Author: Erwin Chemerinsky

Publisher: Picador

ISBN: 1250166004

Category: Law

Page: 320

View: 396

A primer on recognizing the power and promise of the Preamble and the Constitution during this conservative assault on our founding text “Over the course of American history, there have been great gains in individual freedom and enormous advances in equality for racial minorities, women, and gays and lesbians, though obviously much remains to be done. Now we are at a moment with a president who is not committed to these values and face the reality of a Supreme Court that will likely be more hostile to them for the foreseeable future.” --From the Preface Worried about what a super conservative majority on the Supreme Court means for the future of civil liberties? From gun control to reproductive health, a conservative court will reshape the lives of all Americans for decades to come. The time to develop and defend a progressive vision of the U.S. Constitution that protects the rights of all people is now. University of California Berkeley Dean and respected legal scholar Erwin Chemerinsky expertly exposes how conservatives are using the Constitution to advance their own agenda that favors business over consumers and employees, and government power over individual rights. But exposure is not enough. Progressives have spent too much of the last forty-five years trying to preserve the legacy of the Warren Court’s most important rulings and reacting to the Republican-dominated Supreme Courts by criticizing their erosion of rights—but have not yet developed a progressive vision for the Constitution itself. Yet, if we just look to the promise of the Preamble—liberty and justice for all—and take seriously its vision, a progressive reading of the Constitution can lead us forward as we continue our fight ensuring democratic rule, effective government, justice, liberty, and equality. Includes the Complete Constitution and Amendments of the United States of America

The Justice of Contradictions

Antonin Scalia and the Politics of Disruption

Author: Richard L. Hasen

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300228643

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 248

View: 7472

An eye-opening look at the influential Supreme Court justice who disrupted American jurisprudence in order to delegitimize opponents and establish a conservative legal order Engaging but caustic and openly ideological, Antonin Scalia was among the most influential justices ever to serve on the United States Supreme Court. In this fascinating new book, legal scholar Richard L. Hasen assesses Scalia's complex legacy as a conservative legal thinker and disruptive public intellectual. The left saw Scalia as an unscrupulous foe who amplified his judicial role with scathing dissents and outrageous public comments. The right viewed him as a rare principled justice committed to neutral tools of constitutional and statutory interpretation. Hasen provides a more nuanced perspective, demonstrating how Scalia was crucial to reshaping jurisprudence on issues from abortion to gun rights to separation of powers. A jumble of contradictions, Scalia promised neutral tools to legitimize the Supreme Court, but his jurisprudence and confrontational style moved the Court to the right, alienated potential allies, and helped to delegitimize the institution he was trying to save.

San Antonio V. Rodriguez and the Pursuit of Equal Education

The Debate Over Discrimination and School Funding

Author: Paul A. Sracic

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Education

Page: 169

View: 7069

An in-depth study of school financing examined through the closely decided Supreme Court case that overturned a ruling that found Texas's system for financing its public schools was unconstitutional, signaling the end of an era in the pursuit of equal education for all American citizens.

The Chief Justice

Appointment and Influence

Author: David J Danelski,Artemus Ward

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472119915

Category: Law

Page: 464

View: 7703

Scholars use the most advanced methods in judicial studies to examine the role of Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court

The Federal Courts

An Essential History

Author: Peter Charles Hoffer,N. E. H. Hull

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199387907

Category: Courts

Page: 560

View: 473

There are moments in American history when all eyes are focused on a federal court: when its bench speaks for millions of Americans, and when its decision changes the course of history. More often, the story of the federal judiciary is simply a tale of hard work: of finding order in the chaotic system of state and federal law, local custom, and contentious lawyering. The Federal Courts is a story of all of these courts and the judges and justices who served on them, of the case law they made, and of the acts of Congress and the administrative organs that shaped the courts. But, even more importantly, this is a story of the courts' development and their vital part in America's history. Peter Charles Hoffer, Williamjames Hull Hoffer, and N. E. H. Hull's retelling of that history is framed the three key features that shape the federal courts' narrative: the separation of powers; the federal system, in which both the national and state governments are sovereign; and the widest circle: the democratic-republican framework of American self-government. The federal judiciary is not elective and its principal judges serve during good behavior rather than at the pleasure of Congress, the President, or the electorate. But the independence that lifetime tenure theoretically confers did not and does not isolate the judiciary from political currents, partisan quarrels, and public opinion. Many vital political issues came to the federal courts, and the courts' decisions in turn shaped American politics. The federal courts, while the least democratic branch in theory, have proved in some ways and at various times to be the most democratic: open to ordinary people seeking redress, for example. Litigation in the federal courts reflects the changing aspirations and values of America's many peoples. The Federal Courts is an essential account of the branch that provides what Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Judge Oliver Wendell Homes Jr. called "a magic mirror, wherein we see reflected our own lives."

The Erosion of Tribal Power

The Supreme Court's Silent Revolution

Author: Dewi I. Ball

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780806155654

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 8772

For the past 180 years, the inherent power of indigenous tribes to govern themselves has been a central tenet of federal Indian law. Despite the U.S. Supreme Court's repeated confirmation of Native sovereignty since the early 1830s, it has, in the past half-century, incrementally curtailed the power of tribes to govern non-Indians on Indian reservations. The result, Dewi Ioan Ball argues, has been a "silent revolution," mounted by particular justices so gradually and quietly that the significance of the Court's rulings has largely evaded public scrutiny. Ball begins his examination of the erosion of tribal sovereignty by reviewing the so-called Marshall trilogy, the three cases that established two fundamental principles: tribal sovereignty and the power of Congress to protect Indian tribes from the encroachment of state law. Neither the Supreme Court nor Congress has remained faithful to these principles, Ball shows. Beginning with Williams v. Lee, a 1959 case that highlighted the tenuous position of Native legal authority over reservation lands and their residents, Ball analyzes multiple key cases, demonstrating how the Supreme Court's decisions weakened the criminal, civil, and taxation authority of tribal nations. During an era when many tribes were strengthening their economies and preserving their cultural identities, the high court was undermining sovereignty. In Atkinson Trading Co. v. Shirley (2001) and Nevada v. Hicks (2001), for example, the Court all but obliterated tribal authority over non-Indians on Native land. By drawing on the private papers of Chief Justice Earl Warren and Justices Harry A. Blackmun, William J. Brennan, Thurgood Marshall, William O. Douglas, Lewis F. Powell Jr., and Hugo L. Black, Ball offers crucial insight into federal Indian law from the perspective of the justices themselves. The Erosion of Tribal Power shines much-needed light on crucial changes to federal Indian law between 1959 and 2001 and discusses how tribes have dealt with the political and economic consequences of the Court's decisions.

Red, White, and Blue

A Critical Analysis of Constitutional Law

Author: Mark V. Tushnet

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780700621026

Category: Law

Page: 376

View: 4237

Examines the major approaches to constitutional interpretation developed in the late twentieth century. Though interpretive theories purport to constrain judges in a disciplined way, none actually can do so. An Afterword brings the story up to the present, without altering its conclusion, that "Critique is all there is."

Analytics, Policy, and Governance

Author: Benjamin Ginsberg,Kathy Wagner Hill,Jennifer Bachner

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300208391

Category:

Page: 272

View: 5263

The first available textbook on the rapidly growing and increasingly important field of government analytics This first textbook on the increasingly important field of government analytics provides invaluable knowledge and training for students of government in the synthesis, interpretation, and communication of "big data," which is now an integral part of governance and policy making. Integrating all the major components of this rapidly growing field, this invaluable text explores the intricate relationship of data analytics to governance while providing innovative strategies for the retrieval and management of information.

Fish Raincoats

A Woman Lawyer's Life

Author: Barbara Babcock

Publisher: Quid Pro Books

ISBN: 1610273613

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 242

View: 9862

The life and times of a trailblazing feminist in American law. The first female Stanford law professor was also first director of the District of Columbia Public Defender Service, one of the first women to be an Assistant Attorney General of the United States, and the biographer of California’s first woman lawyer, Clara Foltz. Survivor, pioneer, leader, and fervent defender of the powerless and colorful mobsters alike, Barbara Babcock led by example and by the written word—and recounts her part of history in this candid and personal memoir. “For woman lawyers, Barbara Babcock has led the way. How? By being smarter and tougher than the men; also, more empathetic and self-aware. Funny, shrewd, and telling, her memoir Fish Raincoats is a joy to read.” — Evan Thomas, author of Being Nixon: A Man Divided “An immensely engaging, articulate and detail-rich memoir from a pioneer who helped forge the path for women in the legal profession. Barbara Babcock taught, mentored and inspired generations of law students to look beyond the billable hour; she has chronicled her times—the modern Women’s Movement, the challenges and characters she met along the way—with insight, humility and grace.” — Thelton E. Henderson, Senior U.S. District Judge, San Francisco “Life will afford you no better sherpa on the extraordinary journey women have taken in the legal profession than Barbara Babcock. From her description of her career in DC courtrooms, to her role in the battle to defeat the Bork nomination, and her pathbreaking biography of another woman ‘first,’ she is the same warm and generous storyteller and narrator who welcomed untold numbers of new students to Stanford Law School and assured us all that we indeed had a place in the life of the law. This should be required reading for anyone who isn’t certain that they have a place at the lawyers table. Babcock’s amazing life has made a space for so many of us. Her story will do the same.” — Dahlia Lithwick, Senior Editor, Slate “‘But men are writing the history!’ Barbara Babcock thought to herself in response to a sexist comment about women in the law years ago. Not anymore. Babcock spins her formidable legal career into insightful stories about how she made her way and made her field her own. The best kind of personal history.” — Emily Bazelon, author of Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy Fish Raincoats is a compelling new addition to the Journeys & Memoirs Series from Quid Pro Books; also available in paperback and clothbound editions. Quality digital formatting includes linked notes, active Contents, active URLs in notes, and all the original images (thirteen, most in color) from the print editions.

Constitutional Law

Author: Erwin Chemerinsky

Publisher: Wolters Kluwer Law & Business

ISBN: 1454860596

Category: Law

Page: 1900

View: 1195

A leading fifth edition text by a prominent scholar, Constitutional Law, is known for its concise, yet comprehensive presentation. Professor Chemerinsky’s distinctive approach presents the law solely through case excerpts and his own essays, and with the author’s context and background information, the law becomes more readily understood. The text’s flexible organization accommodates a variety of course structures so that no chapter assumes that students have read preceding material. Finally, a complete Teacher's Manual and Annual Case Supplement round out this acclaimed Constitutional Law text. Features: Comprehensive coverage; accessible writing style Distinctive approach presents the law solely through case excerpts and author-written essays Provides context and background information Flexible organization—no chapter assumes that students have read other chapters Updated throughout; includes major new cases

Supreme Democracy

The End of Elitism in Supreme Court Nominations

Author: Richard Davis

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190656964

Category: LAW

Page: 272

View: 2293

"In Supreme Court Nominations in an Age of Democracy, Richard Davis, an eminent scholar of American politics and the courts, traces the history of nominations from the early republic to the present, focusing in particular on how changes in the process have affected the two central institutions involved: the presidency and the Senate. He breaks the process down into its components and examines them one by one: the presidential nomination stage, the confirmation management process, the role of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and the increasing involvement over time of interest groups, television networks, Internet commentators, and-more broadly-public opinion. From there, Davis analyzes how the transformation of the process in recent years has affected both the Senate and the presidency. As a consequence of these changes, the Senate has seen its internal procedures and rules change. It has also affected relations between the two parties within the institution, and reshaped how Senators' interact with constituents. The presidency has transformed, as well. The infrastructure for advancing confirmations has grown enormously, and the president puts far more effort into winning over public opinion than in the past. Needless to say, the relationship between the Senate and presidency has changed too, and in a more acrimonious direction. Partly because of Davis' focus on how institutions evolve over time, this will stand as an authoritative analysis of the Supreme Court nomination process from the founding era to the present"--

Corporations Are People Too

(And They Should Act Like It)

Author: Kent Greenfield

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0300211473

Category: Law

Page: 296

View: 2350

Why we're better off treating corporations as people under the law--and making them behave like citizens Are corporations people? The U.S. Supreme Court launched a heated debate when it ruled in Citizens United that corporations can claim the same free speech rights as humans. Should corporations be able to claim rights of free speech, religious conscience, and due process? Kent Greenfield provides an answer: Sometimes. With an analysis sure to challenge the assumptions of both progressives and conservatives, Greenfield explores corporations' claims to constitutional rights and the foundational conflicts about their obligations in society. He argues that a blanket opposition to corporate personhood is misguided, since it is consistent with both the purpose of corporations and the Constitution itself that corporations can claim rights at least some of the time. The problem with Citizens United is not that corporations have a right to speak, but for whom they speak. The solution is not to end corporate personhood but to require corporations to act more like citizens.