Benjamin Elijah Mays, Schoolmaster of the Movement

A Biography

Author: Randal Maurice Jelks

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807835366

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 327

View: 3890

In this first full-length biography of Benjamin Mays (1894-1984), Randal Maurice Jelks chronicles the life of the man Martin Luther King Jr. called his "spiritual and intellectual father." Dean of the Howard University School of Religion, president of Mor

Benjamin Elijah Mays, Schoolmaster of the Movement

A Biography

Author: Randal Maurice Jelks

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807869872

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 1490

In this first full-length biography of Benjamin Mays (1894-1984), Randal Maurice Jelks chronicles the life of the man Martin Luther King Jr. called his "spiritual and intellectual father." Dean of the Howard University School of Religion, president of Morehouse College, and mentor to influential black leaders, Mays had a profound impact on the education of the leadership of the black church and of a generation of activists, policymakers, and educators. Jelks argues that Mays's ability to connect the message of Christianity with the responsibility to challenge injustice prepared the black church for its pivotal role in the civil rights movement. From Mays's humble origins in Epworth, South Carolina, through his doctoral education, his work with institutions such as the National Urban League, the NAACP, and the national YMCA movement, and his significant career in academia, Jelks creates a rich portrait of the man, the teacher, and the scholar. Benjamin Elijah Mays, Schoolmaster of the Movement is a powerful portrayal of one man's faith, thought, and mentorship in bringing American apartheid to an end.

Born to Rebel

An Autobiography

Author: Benjamin E. Mays

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820342270

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 448

View: 2493

Born the son of a sharecropper in 1894 near Ninety Six, South Carolina, Benjamin E. Mays went on to serve as president of Morehouse College for twenty-seven years and as the first president of the Atlanta School Board. His earliest memory, of a lynching party storming through his county, taunting but not killing his father, became for Mays an enduring image of black-white relations in the South. Born to Rebel is the moving chronicle of his life, a story that interlaces achievement with the rebuke he continually confronted.

The Race Whisperer

Barack Obama and the Political Uses of Race

Author: Melanye T. Price

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479819255

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 2919

Nearly a week after George Zimmerman was found not guilty of killing Trayvon Martin, President Obama walked into the press briefing room and shocked observers by saying that “Trayvon could have been me.” He talked personally and poignantly about his experiences and pointed to intra-racial violence as equally serious and precarious for black boys. He offered no sweeping policy changes or legislative agendas; he saw them as futile. Instead, he suggested that prejudice would be eliminated through collective efforts to help black males and for everyone to reflect on their own prejudices. Obama’s presidency provides a unique opportunity to engage in a discussion about race and politics. In The Race Whisperer, Melanye Price analyzes the manner in which Barack Obama uses race strategically to engage with and win the loyalty of potential supporters. This book uses examples from Obama’s campaigns and presidency to demonstrate his ability to authentically tap into notions of blackness and whiteness to appeal to particular constituencies. By tailoring his unorthodox personal narrative to emphasize those parts of it that most resonate with a specific racial group, he targets his message effectively to that audience, shoring up electoral and governing support. The book also considers the impact of Obama’s use of race on the ongoing quest for black political empowerment. Unfortunately, racial advocacy for African Americans has been made more difficult because of the intense scrutiny of Obama’s relationship with the black community, Obama’s unwillingness to be more publicly vocal in light of that scrutiny, and the black community’s reluctance to use traditional protest and advocacy methods on a black president. Ultimately, though, The Race Whisperer argues for a more complex reading of race in the age of Obama, breaking new ground in the study of race and politics, public opinion, and political campaigns.

African Americans in the Furniture City

The Struggle for Civil Rights in Grand Rapids

Author: Randal Maurice Jelks

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252073479

Category: History

Page: 217

View: 8076

African Americans in the Furniture City is unique not only in terms of its subject, but also for its framing of the African American struggle for survival, civil rights, and community inside a discussion of the larger white community. Examining the African-American community of Grand Rapids, Michigan between 1850 and 1954, Randal Maurice Jelks uncovers the ways in which its members faced urbanization, responded to structural racism, developed in terms of occupations, and shaped their communal identities. Focusing on the intersection of African Americans' nineteenth-century cultural values and the changing social and political conditions in the first half of the twentieth century, Jelks pays particularly close attention to the religious community's influence during their struggle toward a respectable social identity and fair treatment under the law. He explores how these competing values defined the community's politics as it struggled to expand its freedoms and change its status as a subjugated racial minority.

Christians and the Color Line

Race and Religion After Divided by Faith

Author: Philip Luke Sinitiere

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199329508

Category: Religion

Page: 278

View: 6361

The essays in Christians and the Color Line complicate the research findings of Emerson and Smith's Divided by Faith (2000) and explore new areas of research that have opened in the years since its publication.

A Long Journey: Dr. Benjamin E. Mays

Speaks on the Struggle for Social Justice in America

Author: Freddie C. Colston,Benjamin Elijah Mays

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 9781456847210

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 2950

This volume contains twenty-one speeches on the long and enduring struggle for equal rights, from one of America's finest scholars and orators on race relations in American history. Dr. Benjamin E. Mays. He witnessed race relations (1920s 1980s), and the transformation of America from a rigidly segregated society to a desegregated social structure. Mays is often referred to as the "Godfather of the Civil Rights Movement" of the 1960s, since he mentored many of the leaders of the movement. And he is acknowledged as the spiritual and intellectual mentor of Martin Luther King, Jr. the selfless leader of the most important social movement of the twentieth century, and the Nobel laureate's birthday is a national holiday celebrated on the third Monday in January annually. Outside of King's immediate family, Dr. Mays influenced his spiritual and intellectual maturation more than anyone else.

The Legend of the Black Mecca

Politics and Class in the Making of Modern Atlanta

Author: Maurice J. Hobson

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469635364

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 4303

For more than a century, the city of Atlanta has been associated with black achievement in education, business, politics, media, and music, earning it the nickname "the black Mecca." Atlanta's long tradition of black education dates back to Reconstruction, and produced an elite that flourished in spite of Jim Crow, rose to leadership during the civil rights movement, and then took power in the 1970s by building a coalition between white progressives, business interests, and black Atlantans. But as Maurice J. Hobson demonstrates, Atlanta's political leadership--from the election of Maynard Jackson, Atlanta's first black mayor, through the city's hosting of the 1996 Olympic Games--has consistently mishandled the black poor. Drawn from vivid primary sources and unnerving oral histories of working-class city-dwellers and hip-hop artists from Atlanta's underbelly, Hobson argues that Atlanta's political leadership has governed by bargaining with white business interests to the detriment of ordinary black Atlantans. In telling this history through the prism of the black New South and Atlanta politics, policy, and pop culture, Hobson portrays a striking schism between the black political elite and poor city-dwellers, complicating the long-held view of Atlanta as a mecca for black people.

Stars for Freedom

Hollywood, Black Celebrities, and the Civil Rights Movement

Author: Emilie Raymond

Publisher: Capell Family Books

ISBN: 9780295742670

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 2984

From Oprah Winfrey to Angelina Jolie, George Clooney to Leonardo DiCaprio, Americans have come to expect that Hollywood celebrities will be outspoken advocates for social and political causes. However, that wasn't always the case. As Emilie Raymond shows, during the civil rights movement the Stars for Freedom - a handful of celebrities both black and white - risked their careers by crusading for racial equality, and forged the role of celebrity in American political culture. Focusing on the "Leading Six" trailblazers - Harry Belafonte, Ossie Davis, Ruby Dee, Sammy Davis, Jr., Dick Gregory, and Sidney Poitier - Raymond reveals how they not only advanced the civil rights movement in front of the cameras, but also worked tirelessly behind the scenes, raising money for Martin Luther King, Jr.'s legal defense, leading membership drives for the NAACP, and personally engaging with workaday activists to boost morale. Through meticulous research, engaging writing, and new interviews with key players, Raymond traces the careers of the Leading Six against the backdrop of the movement. Perhaps most revealing is the new light she sheds on Sammy Davis, Jr., exploring how his controversial public image allowed him to raise more money for the movement than any other celebrity. The result is an entertaining and informative book that will appeal to film buffs and civil rights historians alike, as well as to anyone interested in the rise of celebrity power in American society.

Ali

A Life

Author: Jonathan Eig

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0544435249

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 640

View: 9561

"Based on more than 500 interviews, including Muhammad Ali's closest associates, and enhanced by access to thousands of pages of newly released FBI records, this is a ... story of a man who became one of the great figures of the twentieth century [boxing world]"--

Men and Women Adrift

The YMCA and the YWCA in the City

Author: Nina Mjagkij,Margaret Ann Spratt

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814755410

Category: History

Page: 311

View: 2589

The Dark Age Ridiculed, by Níla·kantha, Beguiling Artistry, by Ksheméndra, The Hundred Allegories, by Bhállata Written over a period of nearly a thousand years, these works show three very different approaches to satire. Níla·kantha gets straight to the point: swindlers prey on stupidity. The artistry that beguiles Ksheméndra is as varied as human nature and just as fallible. We are off to a gentle start Sanctimonious--really no more than a warm-up among vices—but soon graduate to Greed and Lust. From there it's downhill all the way, as unfaithfulness leads on to fraud, and drunkenness to depravity; deception and quackery bring up the rear. What's this at the very end? Virtue? A late arrival, pale and unconvincing. This volume presents three Indian satirists with three different strategies: in the ninth century C.E., Bhállata sought vengeance on his boorish new king by producing vicious sarcastic verse, “The Hundred Allegories;” in the eleventh century, Ksheméndra presents himself as a social reformer out to shame the complacent into compliance with Vedic morality; and in the seventeenth century little can redeem the fallen characters Níla·kantha portrays, so his duty is simply to warn about the corruption of every social type. Co-published by New York University Press and the JJC Foundation For more on this title and other titles in the Clay Sanskrit series, please visit http://www.claysanskritlibrary.org

Hoodlums

Black Villains and Social Bandits in American Life

Author: William L. Van Deburg

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226847191

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 283

View: 983

Martin Luther King Jr. Malcolm X. Muhammad Ali. When you think of African American history, you think of its heroes—individuals endowed with courage and strength who are celebrated for their bold exploits and nobility of purpose. But what of black villains? Villains, just as much as heroes, have helped define the black experience. Ranging from black slaveholders and frontier outlaws to serial killers and gangsta rappers, Hoodlums examines the pivotal role of black villains in American society and popular culture. Here, William L. Van Deburg offers the most extensive treatment to date of the black badman and the challenges that this figure has posed for race relations in America. He first explores the evolution of this problematic racial stereotype in the literature of the early Republic—documents in which the enslavement of African Americans was justified through exegetical claims. Van Deburg then probes antebellum slave laws, minstrel shows, and the works of proslavery polemicists to consider how whites conceptualized blacks as members of an inferior and dangerous race. Turning to key works by blacks themselves, from the writings of Frederick Douglass and W. E. B. Du Bois to classic blaxploitation films like Black Caesar and The Mack, Van Deburg demonstrates how African Americans have combated such negative stereotypes and reconceptualized the idea of the badman through stories of social bandits—controversial individuals vilified by whites for their proclivity toward evil, but revered in the black community as necessarily insurgent and revolutionary. Ultimately, Van Deburg brings his story up-to-date with discussions of prison and hip-hop culture, urban rioting, gang warfare, and black-on-black crime. What results is a work of remarkable virtuosity—a nuanced history that calls for both whites and blacks to rethink received wisdom on the nature and prevalence of black villainy.

Never Surrender

Confederate Memory and Conservatism in the South Carolina Upcountry

Author: W. Scott Poole

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820325071

Category: History

Page: 263

View: 8891

Near Appomattox, during a cease-fire in the final hours of the Civil War, Confederate general Martin R. Gary harangued his troops to stand fast and not lay down their arms. Stinging the soldiers' home-state pride, Gary reminded them that "South Carolinians never surrender." By focusing on a reactionary hotbed within a notably conservative state--South Carolina's hilly western "upcountry"--W. Scott Poole chronicles the rise of a post-Civil War southern culture of defiance whose vestiges are still among us. The society of the rustic antebellum upcountry, Poole writes, clung to a set of values that emphasized white supremacy, economic independence, masculine honor, evangelical religion, and a rejection of modernity. In response to the Civil War and its aftermath, this amorphous tradition cohered into the Lost Cause myth, by which southerners claimed moral victory despite military defeat. It was a force that would undermine Reconstruction and, as Poole shows in chapters on religion, gender, and politics, weave its way into nearly every dimension of white southern life. The Lost Cause's shadow still looms over the South, Poole argues, in contemporary controversies such as those over the display of the Confederate flag. Never Surrender brings new clarity to the intellectual history of southern conservatism and the South's collective memory of the Civil War.

Real Role Models

Successful African Americans Beyond Pop Culture

Author: Joah Spearman,Louis Harrison, Jr.

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292736797

Category: Social Science

Page: 182

View: 688

All young people need good role models, and black youth especially need positive and real examples beyond the famous and wealthy people they see on SportsCenter highlights and MTV Cribs. While success as a celebrity athlete or entertainer may seem like an achievable dream, the reality is that young African Americans have a much greater chance of succeeding in the professions through education and hard work—and a mentor to show them the path. Real Role Models introduces high school and college-age African Americans to twenty-three black professionals who have achieved a high level of success in their chosen fields and who tell their stories to inspire young people to pursue a professional career and do the work necessary to achieve their dreams. Some of the individuals profiled by Joah Spearman and Louis Harrison, Jr., include Leonard Pitts, Pulitzer Prize–winning columnist for the Miami Herald; Melody Barnes, Director of the White House Domestic Policy Council; Danyel Smith, editor-in-chief of Vibe; and Dr. Tim George, Chief of Pediatric Neuroscience at Dell Children's Medical Center of Central Texas. They and other interviewees describe their backgrounds, career paths, and desire to give back by helping others reach their goals. Representing a wide range of occupations, these real role models prove to African American youths that a whole world of successful, rewarding careers awaits them. The Real Role Models Rufus Cormier, JD, Partner at the Baker Botts Law Firm, Houston, Texas Melody Barnes, Director of the White House Domestic Policy Council, Washington, D.C. Eric Motley, PhD, Managing Director of the Aspen Institute's Henry Crown Fellowship Program, Aspen, Colorado James McIntyre, Spokesman for the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Washington, D.C. Tracie Hall, Assistant Dean and Librarian at Dominican University, River Forest, Illinois Kimberlydawn Wisdom, MD, Surgeon General of the State of Michigan, Lansing, Michigan Timothy George, MD, Chief of Pediatric Neuroscience at Dell Children's Medical Center, Austin, Texas Victoria Holloway Barbosa, MD, Ethnic Dermatologist and Former Executive for L'Oreal, Chicago, Illinois Bill Douglas, White House Correspondent for McClatchy Newspapers, Washington, D.C. Leonard Pitts, Jr., Columnist for the Miami Herald, Miami, Florida Danyel Smith, Editor of Vibe Magazine, New York, New York Ed Stewart, Managing Director of External Communications for Delta Airlines, Atlanta, Georgia Lynn Tyson, Vice President of Investor Relations for Dell, Austin, Texas Willie Miles, Jr., Founder and CEO of Miles Wealth Management, Houston, Texas Horace Allen, Founder and CEO of TeamPact, Atlanta, Georgia Deavra Daughtry, President and CEO of Excellent Care Management, Houston, Texas Je'Caryous Johnson, Founder and CEO of I'm Ready Productions, Houston, Texas Steve Jones, Cofounder of a graphic design company, Oakland, California Isiah Warner, PhD, Chemistry Professor at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana Gloria Ladson-Billings, PhD, Professor of Education at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin Bernard Muir, Athletic Director at Georgetown University, Washington, D.C. Craig Littlepage, Athletic Director at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia Beverly Kearney, Women's Track Coach at the University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas

The Wings of Ethiopia

Studies in African-American Life and Letters

Author: Wilson Jeremiah Moses

Publisher: Iowa State Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: African Americans

Page: 291

View: 2856


Race and Religion in American History

Bounds of Their Habitation

Author: Paul Harvey

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 9781442236189

Category:

Page: 216

View: 874

There is an "American Way" to religion and race unlike anyplace else in the world, and the rise of religious pluralism in contemporary American (together with the continuing legacy of the racism of the past and misapprehensions in the present) render its understanding crucial. Paul Harvey's Bounds of Their Habitation, the latest installment in the acclaimed American Ways Series, concisely surveys the evolution and interconnection of race and religion throughout American history. Harvey pierces through the often overly academic treatments afforded these essential topics to accessibly delineate a narrative between our nation's revolutionary racial and religious beginnings, and our increasingly contested and pluralistic future. Anyone interested in the paths America's racial and religious histories have traveled, where they've most profoundly intersected, and where they will go from here, will thoroughly enjoy this book and find its perspectives and purpose essential for any deeper understanding of the soul of the American nation.

The Religious Left in Modern America

Doorkeepers of a Radical Faith

Author: Leilah Danielson,Marian Mollin,Doug Rossinow

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319731203

Category: History

Page: 303

View: 616

This edited collection of exciting new scholarship provides comprehensive coverage of the broad sweep of twentieth century religious activism on the American left. The volume covers a diversity of perspectives, including Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish history, and important essays on African-American, Latino, and women’s spirituality. Taken together, these essays offer a comparative and long-term perspective on religious groups and social movements often studied in isolation, and fully integrate faith-based action into the history of progressive social movements and politics in the modern United States. It becomes clear that throughout the twentieth century, religious faith has served as a powerful motivator and generator for activism, not just as on the right, where observers regularly link religion and politics, but on the left. This volume will appeal to historians of modern American politics, religion, and social movements, religious studies scholars, and contemporary activists.

The Cambridge Guide to African American History

Author: Raymond Gavins

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107103398

Category: History

Page: 346

View: 7324

Intended for high school and college students, teachers, adult educational groups, and general readers, this book is of value to them primarily as a learning and reference tool. It also provides a critical perspective on the actions and legacies of ordinary and elite blacks and their non-black allies.

Living with Miss G

Author: Mearene Jordan

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780615686516

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 260

View: 9294

Many books have been written about the fascinating public and private life of Ava Gardner, one of the most famous and beautiful film stars of all time-but none can compare to this one by Mearene "Rene" Jordan. While some biographers had to rely on second-hand knowledge and newspaper and magazine articles that were often unreliable or deliberately inaccurate, Jordan (whose nickname is pronounced "Reenie") was on the scene for countless real-life Gardner episodes that rivaled any fiction. It is a must-read for classic movie enthusiasts and also for those who need a reminder of what true friendship is.