Battling the Inland Sea

Floods, Public Policy, and the Sacramento Valley

Author: Robert Kelley

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520921214

Category: History

Page: 420

View: 6212

In its natural condition the Sacramento Valley was a flood-ravaged region where an inland sea a hundred miles long regularly formed during the rainy season, to drain slowly away by the summer months. Today the Valley is marvelously productive, with a great capital city at its center, but only after a seventy-year struggle to devise and build an intricate thousand miles of levees and drains. Robert Kelley sets that battle within the encompassing national political culture, which produced, through the Republican and Democratic parties, widely diverging ideas about how best to reclaim the Valley from flood. He draws on approaches developed in the field of policy analysis to examine the relationship between American political culture and environmental policy-making. We find that the prolonged controversy over the Sacramento Valley illuminates American decision-making, then and now.

Battling the Inland Sea

American Political Culture, Public Policy, and the Sacramento Valley, 1850-1986

Author: Robert Lloyd Kelley

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 395

View: 4950

In its natural condition the Sacramento Valley flooded annually and an inland sea formed during the rainy season, draining slowly away by the summer months. The effort to control the flooding and exploit the rich valley for agriculture has resulted in an intricate, thousand-mile system of levees and drains. Robert Kelley documents and analyzes the process and the widely-diverging ideas about how best to reclaim the Valley from flood -- a process equally relevant to riverine areas across the country, many of which experienced serious flooding in 1997. A new foreword by David N. Kennedy discusses the Sacramento Valley floods of 1997. "A valuable study, rich in scholarly detail and documentation... of America's use -- and abuse -- of natural resources in the western United States". -- Thomas Jablonsky, Southern California Quarterly

River City and Valley Life

An Environmental History of the Sacramento Region

Author: Christopher J. Castaneda,Lee M. A. Simpson

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press

ISBN: 0822979187

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 1288

Often referred to as “the Big Tomato,” Sacramento is a city whose makeup is significantly more complex than its agriculture-based sobriquet implies. In River City and Valley Life, seventeen contributors reveal the major transformations to the natural and built environment that have shaped Sacramento and its suburbs, residents, politics, and economics throughout its history. The site that would become Sacramento was settled in 1839, when Johann Augustus Sutter attempted to convert his Mexican land grant into New Helvetia (or “New Switzerland”). It was at Sutter’s sawmill fifty miles to the east that gold was first discovered, leading to the California Gold Rush of 1849. Nearly overnight, Sacramento became a boomtown, and cityhood followed in 1850. Ideally situated at the confluence of the American and Sacramento Rivers, the city was connected by waterway to San Francisco and the surrounding region. Combined with the area’s warm and sunny climate, the rivers provided the necessary water supply for agriculture to flourish. The devastation wrought by floods and cholera, however, took a huge toll on early populations and led to the construction of an extensive levee system that raised the downtown street level to combat flooding. Great fortune came when local entrepreneurs built the Central Pacific Railroad, and in 1869 it connected with the Union Pacific Railroad to form the first transcontinental passage. Sacramento soon became an industrial hub and major food-processing center. By 1879, it was named the state capital and seat of government. In the twentieth century, the Sacramento area benefitted from the federal government’s major investment in the construction and operation of three military bases and other regional public works projects. Rapid suburbanization followed along with the building of highways, bridges, schools, parks, hydroelectric dams, and the Rancho Seco nuclear power plant, which activists would later shut down. Today, several tribal gaming resorts attract patrons to the area, while “Old Sacramento” revitalizes the original downtown as it celebrates Sacramento’s pioneering past. This environmental history of Sacramento provides a compelling case study of urban and suburban development in California and the American West. As the contributors show, Sacramento has seen its landscape both ravaged and reborn. As blighted areas, rail yards, and riverfronts have been reclaimed, and parks and green spaces created and expanded, Sacramento’s identity continues to evolve. As it moves beyond its Gold Rush, Transcontinental Railroad, and government-town heritage, Sacramento remains a city and region deeply rooted in its natural environment.

Flood Risk Management

Global Case Studies of Governance, Policy and Communities

Author: Edmund C. Penning-Rowsell,Matilda Becker

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351009982

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 210

View: 7311

Our changing climate and more extreme weather events have dramatically increased the number and severity of floods across the world. Demonstrating the diversity of global flood risk management (FRM), this volume covers a range of topics including planning and policy, risk governance and communication, forecasting and warning, and economics. Through short case studies, the range of international examples from North America, Europe, Asia and Africa provide analysis of FRM efforts, processes and issues from human, governance and policy implementation perspectives. Written by an international set of authors, this collection of chapters and case studies will allow the reader to see how floods and flood risk management is experienced in different regions of the world. The way in which institutions manage flood risk is discussed, introducing the notions of realities and social constructions when it comes to risk management. The book will be of great interest to students and professionals of flood, coastal, river and natural hazard management, as well as risk analysis and insurance, demonstrating multiple academic frameworks of analysis and their utility and drawbacks when applied to real-life FRM contexts.

Endangered Dreams

The Great Depression in California

Author: Kevin Starr

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199923566

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 9134

California, Wallace Stegner observed, is like the rest of the United States, only more so. Indeed, the Golden State has always seemed to be a place where the hopes and fears of the American dream have been played out in a bigger and bolder way. And no one has done more to capture this epic story than Kevin Starr, in his acclaimed series of gripping social and cultural histories. Now Starr carries his account into the 1930s, when the political extremes that threatened so much of the Depression-ravaged world--fascism and communism--loomed large across the California landscape. In Endangered Dreams, Starr paints a portrait that is both detailed and panoramic, offering a vivid look at the personalities and events that shaped a decade of explosive tension. He begins with the rise of radicalism on the Pacific Coast, which erupted when the Great Depression swept over California in the 1930s. Starr captures the triumphs and tumult of the great agricultural strikes in the Imperial Valley, the San Joaquin Valley, Stockton, and Salinas, identifying the crucial role played by Communist organizers; he also shows how, after some successes, the Communists disbanded their unions on direct orders of the Comintern in 1935. The highpoint of social conflict, however, was 1934, the year of the coastwide maritime strike, and here Starr's narrative talents are at their best, as he brings to life the astonishing general strike that took control of San Francisco, where workers led by charismatic longshoreman Harry Bridges mounted the barricades to stand off National Guardsmen. That same year socialist Upton Sinclair won the Democratic nomination for governor, and he launched his dramatic End Poverty in California (EPIC) campaign. In the end, however, these challenges galvanized the Right in a corporate, legal, and vigilante counterattack that crushed both organized labor and Sinclair. And yet, the Depression also brought out the finest in Californians: state Democrats fought for a local New Deal; California natives helped care for more than a million impoverished migrants through public and private programs; artists movingly documented the impact of the Depression; and an unprecedented program of public works (capped by the Golden Gate Bridge) made the California we know today possible. In capturing the powerful forces that swept the state during the 1930s--radicalism, repression, construction, and artistic expression--Starr weaves an insightful analysis into his narrative fabric. Out of a shattered decade of economic and social dislocation, he constructs a coherent whole and a mirror for understanding our own time.

Engineering Progress

Californians and the Making of a Global Economy

Author: Jessica Beth Teisch

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Irrigation farming

Page: 748

View: 7525


Contested Landscapes

Using Scientific Information and Collaborative Processes to Support Ecological Restoration

Author: Suzanne M. Langridge

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 254

View: 7022


Material Dreams

Southern California Through the 1920s

Author: Kevin Starr

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 019507260X

Category: Philosophy

Page: 496

View: 6425

Kevin Starr is the foremost chronicler of the California dream and indeed one of the finest narrative historians writing today on any subject. The first two installments of his monumental cultural history, "Americans and the California Dream," have been hailed as "mature, well-proportioned and marvelously diverse (and diverting)" (The New York Times Book Review) and "rich in details and alive with interesting, and sometimes incredible people" (Los Angeles Times). Now, in Material Dreams, Starr turns to one of the most vibrant decades in the Golden State's history, the 1920s, when some two million Americans migrated to California, the vast majority settling in or around Los Angeles. In a lively and eminently readable narrative, Starr reveals how Los Angeles arose almost defiantly on a site lacking many of the advantages required for urban development, creating itself out of sheer will, the Great Gatsby of American cities. He describes how William Ellsworth Smyth, the Peter the Hermit of the Irrigation Crusade, the self-educated, Irish engineer William Mulholland (who built the main aquaducts to Los Angeles), and George Chaffey (who diverted the Colorado River, transforming desert into the lush Imperial Valley) brought life-supporting water to the arid South. He examines the discovery of oil, the boosters and land developers, the evangelists (such as Bob Shuler, the Methodist Savanarola of Los Angeles, and Aimee Semple McPherson), and countless other colorful figures of the period. There are also fascinating sections on the city's architecture the impact of the automobile on city planning, the Hollywood film community, the L.A. literati, and much more. By the end of the decade, Los Angeles had tripled in population and become the fifth largest city in the nation. In Material Dreams, Starr captures this explosive growth in a narrative tour de force that combines wide-ranging scholarship with captivating prose.

World Geography: The World

Author: Ray Sumner

Publisher: Salem PressInc

ISBN: 9780893562762

Category: Science

Page: 2379

View: 3232

Covers the major region of the world, with information on such topics as physical geography, biogeography, economic geography, human geography, and natural resources.

Workshop on Nonstationarity, Hydrologic Frequency Analysis, and Water Management , January 13-15, 2010, Boulder, Colorado

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Climatic changes

Page: 304

View: 2439

"An underlying assumption of traditional hydrologic frequency analysis is that climate, and hence the frequency of hydrologic events, is stationary, or unchanging over time. A stationary series is relatively easy to forecast: one simply predicts that statistical properties will be the same in the future as they have been in the past. Anthropogenic climate change and better understanding of decadal and multi-decadal climate variability present a challenge to the validity of this assumption. The workshop ... was organized to present and discuss possible operational alternatives to the assumption of stationarity in hydrologic frequency analysis."--Abstract.

Inland Island

The Sutter Buttes

Author: Walt Anderson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780961072278

Category: Nature

Page: 273

View: 2129