Attachment-focused Family Therapy Workbook

Author: Daniel A. Hughes

Publisher: W. W. Norton

ISBN: 9780393706499

Category: Psychology

Page: 253

View: 4097

Daniel A. Hughes, a leading practitioner in his field, specializes in an attachment-oriented approach to family therapy. Applying his model to children and families with a range of psychological problems, this book distills just the clinical strategies, offering practitioners a host of practical exercises and interventions on the core skills of his treatment program. An accompanying DVD demonstrates Hughes putting these strategies to work in a therapy session, revealing the undeniable power of attachment-focused family therapy to create a safe psychological space for families to repair attachment breaks and build the foundation for a healthier future.

Attachment-Focused Family Therapy

Author: Daniel A. Hughes

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393075410

Category: Psychology

Page: 296

View: 9475

Over fifty years ago, John Bowlby and Mary Ainsworth’s research on the developmental psychology of children formed the basic tenets of attachment theory. And for years, following these tenets, the theory’s focus has been on how children develop vis-a-vis the attachments—whether secure or insecure—they form with their caregivers. In the therapy room, this has meant working with individuals one-on-one, with the therapist assuming the role of the attachment figure in order to provide a secure base for treating clients’ problems that arose from troubled interpersonal relationships in childhood. Here, Daniel A. Hughes, an eminent clinician and attachment specialist, is the first to expand this traditional model, applying attachment theory to a family therapy setting. Drawing on more than 20 years of clinical experience, Hughes presents his comprehensive, effective, and accessible treatment model for working with all members of a family—not simply the individual in question—to recognize, resolve, and heal personal and family problems using principles from theories of attachment and intersubjectivity. Beginning with an overview of attachment and intersubjectivity—the twin theories from which he forms his treatment plan—Hughes carefully outlines, chapter by chapter, the core principles and strategies of his family-based approach. He elaborates on the need to develop and maintain PACE (playfulness, acceptance, curiosity, and empathy)—the central therapeutic stance of attachment-focused family therapy—and supplies tips and sample dialogues for implementing this position. The importance of fostering affective/reflective (a/r) dialogue is covered in detail, as well as helping families to manage shame, understand and embrace the break-and-repair cycle of their interactions, and explore and resolve childhood trauma. Also discussed are the more procedural issues of how to incorporate parents into therapeutic conversations, when and how to question them on their own attachment histories, and how to “be” with children. Grounded in the fundamental principle of parents facilitating the healthy emotional development of their children, Attachment-Focused Family Therapy is the first book of its kind to offer therapists a complete manual for using attachment therapy with families. Extensive case studies, vignettes, and sample dialogues throughout clearly demonstrate how Hughes’s model plays out in the therapy room. By showing therapists how to create a bond of psychological safety and intersubjective discovery with parents and caregivers, Hughes reveals how they, in turn, can bring about similar experiences of safety and discovery for their children.

Attachment-Focused Parenting: Effective Strategies to Care for Children

Author: Daniel A. Hughes

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393707151

Category: Psychology

Page: 196

View: 2966

An expert clinician brings attachment theory into the realm of parenting skills. Attachment security and affect regulation have long been buzzwords in therapy circles, but many of these ideas—so integral to successful therapeutic work with kids and adolescents— have yet to be effectively translated to parenting practice itself. Moreover, as neuroscience reveals how the human brain is designed to work in good relationships, and how such relationships are central to healthy human development, the practical implications for the parent-child attachment relationship become even more apparent. Here, a leading attachment specialist with over 30 years of clinical experience brings the rich and comprehensive field of attachment theory and research from inside the therapy room to the outside, equipping therapists and caregivers with practical parenting skills and techniques rooted in proven therapeutic principles. A guide for all parents and a resource for all mental health clinicians and parent-educators who are searching for ways to effectively love, discipline, and communicate with children, this book presents the techniques and practices that are fundamental to optimal child development and family functioning—how to set limits, provide guidance, and manage the responsibilities and difficulties of daily life, while at the same time communicating safety, fun, joy, and love. Filled with valuable clinical vignettes and sample dialogues, Hughes shows how attachment-focused research can guide all those who care for children in their efforts to better raise them.

Building the Bonds of Attachment

Awakening Love in Deeply Traumatized Children

Author: Daniel A. Hughes

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 144227414X

Category: Psychology

Page: 304

View: 6710

A highly accessible resource for students and professionals as well as parents, Building the Bonds of Attachment presents a composite case study of one child’s developmental course following years of abuse and neglect. Weaving theory and research into a powerful narrative, Hughes offers effective methods for facilitating attachment in children who have experienced serious trauma. The text emphasizes both the specialized psychotherapy and parenting strategies often necessary in facilitating a child's psychological development and attachment security. Hughes steps through an integrated intervention model that blends attachment and trauma theories with the most current research as well as general principles of both parenting and child and family therapy. Thoughtful and practical, the third edition provides an invaluable guide for therapists and social workers, students in training, and parents. Updates to the Third Edition include: Coverage of the greater preparation given to both the therapist and parent before the onset of the treatment and placement based on our understanding of how the attachment histories of both the parents and therapists impact their engagement with the child Introduction of the concept of blocked care to better understand the challenges of raising a traumatized child with attachment difficulties Introduction of the classification of developmental trauma that is now commonly used to describe the challenges faced by children such as Katie Expanded coverage of intersubjectivity with demonstrations throughout the book as to its impact on the development of the child Stronger development of the therapeutic and parenting stance of PACE (playful, accepting, curious, empathic) since this has become a strong organizing principle for training both therapists and parents using the dyadic developmental psychotherapy (DDP) model Updated examples of the components of DDP (affective-reflective dialogue, follow-lead-follow, interactive repair, deepening the narrative) and a discussion of the ties between DDP and new research in interpersonal neurobiology

The Neurobiology of Attachment-Focused Therapy: Enhancing Connection & Trust in the Treatment of Children & Adolescents (Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology)

Author: Jonathan Baylin,Daniel A. Hughes

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393711056

Category: Psychology

Page: 304

View: 6391

Uniting attachment-focused therapy and neurobiology to help distrustful and traumatized children revive a sense of trust and connection. How can therapists and caregivers help maltreated children recover what they were born with: the potential to experience the safety, comfort, and joy of having trustworthy, loving adults in their lives? This groundbreaking book explores, for the first time, how the attachment-focused family therapy model can respond to this question at a neural level. It is a rich, accessible investigation of the brain science of early childhood and developmental trauma. Each chapter offers clinicians new insights—and powerful new methods—to help neglected and insecurely attached children regain a sense of safety and security with caring adults. Throughout, vibrant clinical vignettes drawn from the authors' own experience illustrate how informed clinical processes can promote positive change. Authors Baylin and Hughes have collaborated for many years on the treatment of maltreated children and their caregivers. Both experienced psychologists, their shared project has bee the development of the science-based model of attachment-focused therapy in this book—a model that links clinical interventions to the crucial underlying processes of trust, mistrust, and trust building—helping children learn to trust caregivers and caregivers to be the "trust builders" these children need. The book begins by explaining the neurobiology of blocked trust, using the latest social neuroscience to show how the child's early development gets channeled into a core strategy of defensive living. Subsequent chapters address, among other valuable subjects, how new research on behavioral epigenetics has shown ways that highly stressful early life experiences affect brain development through patterns of gene expression, adapting the child's brain for mistrust rather than trust, and what it means for treatment approaches. Finally, readers will learn what goes on in the child's brain during attachment-focused therapy, honing in on the dyadic processes of adult-child interaction that seem to embody the core "mechanisms of change": elements of attachment-focused interventions that target the child's defensive brain, calm this system, and reopen the child's potential to learn from new experiences with caring adults, and that it is safe to depend upon them. If trust is to develop and care is to be restored, clinicians need to know what prevents the development of trust in the first place, particularly when a child is living in an environment of good care for a long period of time. What do abuse and neglect do to the development of children's brains that makes it so difficult for them to trust adults who are so different from those who hurt them? This book presents a brain-based understanding that professionals can apply to answering these questions and encouraging the development of healthy trust.

Creating Loving Attachments

Parenting with PACE to Nurture Confidence and Security in the Troubled Child

Author: Daniel Hughes,Kim Golding

Publisher: Jessica Kingsley Publishers

ISBN: 9780857004703

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 240

View: 6272

All children need love, but for troubled children, a loving home is not always enough. Children who have experienced trauma need to be parented in a special way that helps them feel safe and secure, builds attachments and allows them to heal. Playfulness, acceptance, curiosity and empathy (PACE) are four valuable elements of parenting that, combined with love, can help children to feel confident and secure. This book shows why these elements are so important to a child's development, and demonstrates to parents and carers how they can incorporate them into their day-to-day parenting. Real life examples and typical dialogues between parents and children illustrate how this can be done in everyday life, and simple stories highlight the ideas behind each element of PACE. This positive book will help parents and carers understand how parenting with love and PACE is invaluable to a child's development, and will guide them through using this parenting attitude to help their child feel happy, confident and secure.

8 Keys to Building Your Best Relationships (8 Keys to Mental Health)

Author: Daniel A. Hughes

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393708802

Category: Self-Help

Page: 208

View: 7318

Bringing attachment theory essentials to everyday life. A revolution is under way in how we understand the nature of relationships, how we develop in those relationships, and how our brains function synergistically in connection with others. This field is known as attachment theory, and until now most of the cutting-edge insights have been written in “researcher-speak” and reserved for neurologists, psychologists, and others in the healing professions. Here veteran therapist and specialist in attachment disorders Daniel A. Hughes demystifies the research for lay people. By summarizing in short, easy-to-read “keys” the theory and brain science that underpin our ability to form relationships, he skillfully reveals how we can become better friends, spouses, siblings, and children. For anyone interested in how to develop meaningful new relationships or how to deepen and enrich their current ones, this book makes sense of it all.

Attachment Processes in Couple and Family Therapy

Author: Susan M. Johnson,Valerie E. Whiffen

Publisher: Guilford Press

ISBN: 9781572308732

Category: Psychology

Page: 411

View: 6995

Offering fresh and provocative insights on the practice of couple and family therapy, this unique volume shows how attachment theory can inform, enhance, and guide interventions for a wide range of relationship problems and clinical issues. Chapters from leading attachment researchers and family therapists integrate the literature from both fields to provide a multifaceted perspective on the role of attachment in distressed and satisfying relationships. Illustrated with evocative clinical material, the book presents research-based therapy models for embattled couples, families struggling with parent-child conflict and adolescent problems, and adoptive and foster families. Also discussed are ways to support stronger mother-infant attachment attachment-oriented interventions for couples facing specific clinical problems, including depression, PTSD, and chronic pain applications for same-sex couples and much more.

Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy

Essential Practices and Methods

Author: Arthur Becker-Weidman

Publisher: Jason Aronson

ISBN: 0765707950

Category: Psychology

Page: 178

View: 900

The pervasive effects of maltreatment on child development can be repaired when professionals use effective, empirically validated, and evidence-based methods. This book describes a comprehensive approach to treatment, Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, which is an evidence-based, effective, and empirically validated family based treatment. Therapists, social workers, residential treatment programs, psychologists, and child welfare professionals will find this book of immediate practical value. Professors teaching family-therapy, child-welfare, and child-treatment courses will find the book a good adjunct text.

Facilitating Developmental Attachment

The Road to Emotional Recovery and Behavioral Change in Foster and Adopted Children

Author: Daniel A. Hughes

Publisher: Jason Aronson, Incorporated

ISBN: 1461628474

Category: Psychology

Page: 264

View: 5008

This book shows how to work successfully with emotional and behavioral problems rooted in deficient early attachments. In particular, it addresses the emotional difficulties of many of the foster and adopted children living in our country who are unable to form secure attachments. Traditional interventions, which do not teach parents how to successfully engage the child, frequently do not provide the means by which the seriously damaged child can form the secure attachment that underlies behavioral change. Dr. Daniel Hughes maps out a treatment plan designed to help the child begin to experience and accept, from both the therapist and the parents, affective attunement that he or she should have received in the first few years of life. All children, at the core of their beings, need to be attached to someone who considers them to be very special and who is committed to providing for their ongoing care. Children who lose their birth parents desperately need such a relationship if they are to heal and grow. This book shows therapists how to facilitate this crucial bond. A Jason Aronson Book

Handbook of Attachment Interventions

Author: Terry M. Levy

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 0080533388

Category: Psychology

Page: 289

View: 3827

The emotional attachment of a child to caregivers, and the attachment of the caregivers to the child, is of vital importance to the child's socioemotional development. Proper attachment can affect one's ability to feel and express love, moral development, motivation to achieve, and sense of identity. Modern industrial societies have seen a recent surge in attachment problems, yet there has been little information on clinical interventions for attachment disorders. The Handbook of Attachment Interventions meets this need by providing information on diverse patient populations across different therapeutic philosophies, while providing specific techniques for treating attachment disordered children and their families. The book begins with a discussion of how attachment disorders relate to subsequent antisocial behavior patterns and other disorders, as well as general issues parents may encounter with an attachment disordered child. Subsequent chapters discuss special patient populations (the adopted child, military families, etc.) and techniques for intervention. Practitioners in clinical, private practice, managed care, and hospital settings, social workers, developmental psychologists, and interested parents find the Handbook of Attachment Interventions a valuable reference.

Emotionally Focused Couple Therapy with Trauma Survivors

Strengthening Attachment Bonds

Author: Susan M. Johnson

Publisher: Guilford Press

ISBN: 1462504353

Category: Psychology

Page: 228

View: 5395

This book provides a theoretical framework and an innovative model of intervention for distressed couples whose relationships are affected by the echoes of trauma. Combining attachment theory, trauma research, and emotionally focused therapeutic techniques, Susan M. Johnson guides the clinician in modifying the interactional patterns that maintain traumatic stress and fostering positive, healing relationships among survivors and their partners. In-depth case material brings to life the process of assessment and treatment with couples coping with the impact of different kinds of trauma, including childhood abuse, serious illness, and combat experiences. The concluding chapter features valuable advice on therapist self-care.

Brain-Based Parenting: The Neuroscience of Caregiving for Healthy Attachment

Author: Daniel A. Hughes,Jonathan Baylin

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393707687

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 272

View: 8867

An attachment specialist and a clinical psychologist with neurobiology expertise team up to explore the brain science behind parenting. In this groundbreaking exploration of the brain mechanisms behind healthy caregiving, attachment specialist Daniel A. Hughes and veteran clinical psychologist Jonathan Baylin guide readers through the intricate web of neuronal processes, hormones, and chemicals that drive—and sometimes thwart—our caregiving impulses, uncovering the mysteries of the parental brain. The biggest challenge to parents, Hughes and Baylin explain, is learning how to regulate emotions that arise—feeling them deeply and honestly while staying grounded and aware enough to preserve the parent–child relationship. Stress, which can lead to “blocked” or dysfunctional care, can impede our brain’s inherent caregiving processes and negatively impact our ability to do this. While the parent–child relationship can generate deep empathy and the intense motivation to care for our children, it can also trigger self-defensive feelings rooted in our early attachment relationships, and give rise to “unparental” impulses. Learning to be a “good parent” is contingent upon learning how to manage this stress, understand its brain-based cues, and respond in a way that will set the brain back on track. To this end, Hughes and Baylin define five major “systems” of caregiving as they’re linked to the brain, explaining how they operate when parenting is strong and what happens when good parenting is compromised or “blocked.” With this awareness, we learn how to approach kids with renewed playfulness, acceptance, curiosity, and empathy, re-regulate our caregiving systems, foster deeper social engagement, and facilitate our children’s development. Infused with clinical insight, illuminating case examples, and helpful illustrations, Brain-Based Parenting brings the science of caregiving to light for the first time. Far from just managing our children’s behavior, we can develop our “parenting brains,” and with a better understanding of the neurobiological roots of our feelings and our own attachment histories, we can transform a fraught parent-child relationship into an open, regulated, and loving one.

Attachment Parenting

Developing Connections and Healing Children

Author: Arthur Becker-Weidman,Deborah Shell

Publisher: Jason Aronson

ISBN: 076570756X

Category: Psychology

Page: 306

View: 9325

Attachment Parenting describes a comprehensive approach to parenting children who have a history of neglect, abuse, orphanage care, or other experiences that may interfere with the normal development of attachment between parent and child. Grounded in attachment theory, Attachment Parenting gives parents, therapists, educators, and child-welfare and residential-treatment professionals the tools and skills necessary to help these children. With an approach rooted in dyadic developmental psychotherapy, which is an evidence-based, effective, and empirically validated treatment for complex trauma and disorders of attachment, Arthur Becker-Weidman and Deborah Shell provide practical and immediately usable approaches and methods to help children develop a healthier and more secure attachment. Attachment Parenting covers a wide range of topics, from describing the basic principles of this approach and how to select a therapist to chapters on concrete logistics, such as detailed suggestions for organizing the child's room, dealing with schools' concerns, and problem-solving. Chapters on sensory integration, art therapy for parents, narratives, and Theraplay give parents specific therapeutic activities that can be done at home to improve the quality of the child's attachment with the parent. And chapters on neuropsychological issues, mindfulness, and parent's use of self will also help parents directly. The book includes two chapters by parents discussing what worked for them, providing inspiration to parents and demonstrating that there is hope. Finally, the book ends with a comprehensive chapter on resources for parents and a summary of various professional standards regarding attachment, treatment, and parenting.

Creating Capacity for Attachment

Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy in the Treatment of Trauma-attachment Disorders

Author: Deborah Shell,Arthur Becker-Weidman

Publisher: Wood 'N' Barnes Publishing

ISBN: 9781885473721

Category: Psychology

Page: 230

View: 9268

A comprehensive book about Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy - a gentle, holistic therapeutic approach designed to resolve trauma in children who have experienced abuse, neglect, loss or other extreme challenges to primary relationships.

Teenagers and Attachment

Helping Adolescents Engage with Life and Learning

Author: Dan Hughes

Publisher: Worth Publishers

ISBN: 9781903269138

Category: Attachment disorder in adolescence

Page: 224

View: 6879

Offers practical attachment-based strategies to support disaffected teenagers integrate into schools and society. This book enables teachers, psychologists, therapists and social workers to reach out to young people in fresh ways, establishing genuine connection and real possibilities for learning and hope.

An Emotionally Focused Workbook for Couples

The Two of Us

Author: Veronica Kallos-Lilly,Jennifer Fitzgerald

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317804864

Category: Psychology

Page: 200

View: 2857

This workbook is intended for use with couples who want to enhance their emotional connection or overcome their relationship distress. It is recommended for use with couples pursuing Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT). It closely follows the course of treatment and is designed so that clinicians can easily integrate guided reading and reflections into the therapeutic process. The material is presented in a recurring format: Read, Reflect, and Discuss. Readings help couples look at their relationship through an attachment lens, walking them through the step-by-step process of creating a secure relationship bond. 33 Reflections invite readers to engage with the material personally, expanding their own awareness and ability to tune into their partner. Discussion sections suggest relationship-building exercises and a framework for conversations that promote safety, disclosure, and engagement. Case examples, along with informative illustrations, are scattered throughout the book to validate, illustrate, and inspire couples along their journey. Clinicians conversant with EFT can use this workbook to extend the effectiveness of their work with couples by giving them structured tasks to work on between sessions. For clinicians training in EFT, the book can guide them in staying focused on the EFT roadmap and illuminate how important change events unfold.

Using Stories to Build Bridges with Traumatized Children

Creative Ideas for Therapy, Life Story Work, Direct Work and Parenting

Author: Kim Golding

Publisher: Jessica Kingsley Publishers

ISBN: 0857009613

Category: Psychology

Page: 176

View: 5332

Using Stories to Build Bridges with Traumatized Children is full of creative ideas for how you can use stories therapeutically with children in counselling, life story work or direct work. Psychologist Kim S. Golding shows how you can use stories to build connections with children aged 4–16 and support their recovery from trauma and stress. She illustrates the techniques with 21 stories adapted from her own clinical work with children and families, and explains how you can expand or adapt them to make them more relevant for a particular child. Advice and stories are arranged into sections dealing with common psychological issues, including looking back and moving on, lack of trust and need for attention. Golding also gives invaluable tips for planning stories and life story work, and for storymaking with children. She also describes how stories can be used therapeutically with parents of traumatized children and as a tool for self-reflection by counsellors. Imaginative and practical, this book will be enormously useful for counsellors, psychologists, therapists and social workers working with traumatized children, and will also be helpful for parents and carers involved in therapeutic parenting.