Atlas of the Great Irish Famine

Author: William J. Smyth,John Crowley,Mike Murphy

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814771488

Category: History

Page: 728

View: 5076

Best Reference Books of 2012 presented by Library Journal The Great Irish Famine is the most pivotal event in modern Irish history, with implications that cannot be underestimated. Over a million people perished between 1845-1852, and well over a million others fled to other locales within Europe and America. By 1850, the Irish made up a quarter of the population in Boston, New York City, Philadelphia, and Baltimore. The 2000 US census had 41 million people claim Irish ancestry, or one in five white Americans. Atlas of the Great Irish Famine (1845-52) considers how such a near total decimation of a country by natural causes could take place in industrialized, 19th century Europe and situates the Great Famine alongside other world famines for a more globally informed approach. The Atlas seeks to try and bear witness to the thousands and thousands of people who died and are buried in mass Famine pits or in fields and ditches, with little or nothing to remind us of their going. The centrality of the Famine workhouse as a place of destitution is also examined in depth. Likewise the atlas represents and documents the conditions and experiences of the many thousands who emigrated from Ireland in those desperate years, with case studies of famine emigrants in cities such as Liverpool, Glasgow, New York and Toronto. The Atlas places the devastating Irish Famine in greater historic context than has been attempted before, by including over 150 original maps of population decline, analysis and examples of poetry, contemporary art, written and oral accounts, numerous illustrations, and photography, all of which help to paint a fuller picture of the event and to trace its impact and legacy. In this comprehensive and stunningly illustrated volume, over fifty chapters on history, politics, geography, art, population, and folklore provide readers with a broad range of perspectives and insights into this event.

Atlas of the Great Irish Famine, 1845-52

Author: John Crowley,William J. Smyth

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781859184790

Category: Famines

Page: 710

View: 8869

The Great Irish Famine is the most pivotal event in modern Irish history, with implications that cannot be underestimated. Over a million people perished between 1845-1852, and well over a million others fled to other locales within Europe and America. By 1850, the Irish made up a quarter of the population in Boston, New York City, Philadelphia, and Baltimore. The 2000 US census had 41 million people claim Irish ancestry, or one in five white Americans. This book considers how such a near total decimation of a country by natural causes could take place in industrialized, 19th century Europe and situates the Great Famine alongside other world famines for a more globally informed approach. It seeks to try and bear witness to the thousands and thousands of people who died and are buried in mass Famine pits or in fields and ditches, with little or nothing to remind us of their going. The centrality of the Famine workhouse as a place of destitution is also examined in depth. Likewise the atlas represents and documents the conditions and experiences of the many thousands who emigrated from Ireland in those desperate years, with case studies of famine emigrants in cities such as Liverpool, Glasgow, New York and Toronto. The Atlas places the devastating Irish Famine in greater historic context than has been attempted before, by including over 150 original maps of population decline, analysis and examples of poetry, contemporary art, written and oral accounts, numerous illustrations, and photography, all of which help to paint a fuller picture of the event and to trace its impact and legacy. In this comprehensive and stunningly illustrated volume, over fifty chapters on history, politics, geography, art, population, and folklore provide readers with a broad range of perspectives and insights into this event. -- Publisher description.

Mapping the great Irish famine

a survey of the Famine Decades

Author: Líam Kennedy,L. A. Clarkson

Publisher: Four Courts Pr Ltd

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 4929

The story of the Great Irish Famine of the 1840s, including the suffering and cruelty to which it gave rise, can be told in many different ways. This book traces the devastating impact of the catastrophe through the medium of maps, diagrams and commentary. The changes wrought by the crisis are shown at the detailed level of the county, and of the poor-law union or barony wherever possible. This approach highlights the dramatic changes in Irish economy, culture and social structure, which were compressed into a few terrible years.

The Famine Plot

England's Role in Ireland's Greatest Tragedy

Author: Tim Pat Coogan

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1137045175

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 6007

During a Biblical seven years in the middle of the nineteenth century, Ireland experienced the worst disaster a nation could suffer. Fully a quarter of its citizens either perished from starvation or emigrated, with so many dying en route that it was said, "you can walk dry shod to America on their bodies." In this grand, sweeping narrative, Ireland''s best-known historian, Tim Pat Coogan, gives a fresh and comprehensive account of one of the darkest chapters in world history, arguing that Britain was in large part responsible for the extent of the national tragedy, and in fact engineered the food shortage in one of the earliest cases of ethnic cleansing. So strong was anti-Irish sentiment in the mainland that the English parliament referred to the famine as "God's lesson." Drawing on recently uncovered sources, and with the sharp eye of a seasoned historian, Coogan delivers fresh insights into the famine's causes, recounts its unspeakable events, and delves into the legacy of the "famine mentality" that followed immigrants across the Atlantic to the shores of the United States and had lasting effects on the population left behind. This is a broad, magisterial history of a tragedy that shook the nineteenth century and still impacts the worldwide Irish diaspora of nearly 80 million people today.

Ballykilcline Rising

From Famine Ireland to Immigrant America

Author: Mary Lee Dunn

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 9781558496590

Category: History

Page: 218

View: 1416

In 1847, in the third year of Ireland's Great Famine and the thirteenth year of their rent strike against the Crown, hundreds of tenant farmers in Ballykilcline, County Roscommon, were evicted by the Queen's agents and shipped to New York. Mary Lee Dunn tells their story in this meticulously researched book. Using numerous Irish and U.S. sources and with descendants' help, she traces dozens of the evictees to Rutland, Vermont, as railroads and marble quarries transformed the local economy. She follows the immigrants up to 1870 and learns not only what happened to them but also what light American experience and records cast on their Irish "rebellion." Dunn begins with Ireland's pre-Famine social and political landscape as context for the Ballykilcline strike. The tenants had rented earlier from the Mahons of Strokestown, whose former property now houses Ireland's Famine Museum. In 1847, landlord Denis Mahon evicted and sent nearly a thousand tenants to Quebec, where half died before or just after reaching the Grosse Ile quarantine station. Mahon was gunned down months later. His murder provoked an international controversy involving the Vatican. An early suspect in the case was a man from Ballykilcline. In the United States, many of the immigrants resettled in clusters in several locations, including Vermont, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, and New York. In Vermont they found jobs in the marble quarries, but some of them lost their homes again in quarry labor actions after 1859. Others prospered in their new lives. A number of Ballykilcline families who stopped in Rutland later moved west; one had a son kidnapped by Indians in Minnesota. Readers who have Irish Famine roots will gain a sense of their own "back story" from this account of Ireland and the native Irish, and scholars in the field of immigration studies will find it particularly useful.

Famine Echoes

Author: Cathal Póirtéir

Publisher: Gill & MacMillan

ISBN: 9780717123148

Category: Famines

Page: 301

View: 6388

Famine Echoes gives a unique perspective on the greatest tragedy in Irish history as descendants of Famine survivors recall the community memories of the great hunger.

The End of Outrage

Post-Famine Adjustment in Rural Ireland

Author: Breandán Mac Suibhne

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0191058645

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 6251

South-west Donegal, Ireland, June 1856. From the time that the blight first came on the potatoes in 1845, armed and masked men dubbed Molly Maguires had been raiding the houses of people deemed to be taking advantage of the rural poor. On some occasions, they represented themselves as 'Molly's Sons', sent by their mother, to carry out justice; on others, a man attired as a woman, introducing 'herself' as Molly Maguire, demanding redress for wrongs inflicted on her children. The raiders might stipulate the maximum price at which provisions were to be sold, warn against the eviction of tenants, or demand that an evicted family be reinstated to their holding. People who refused to meet their demands were often viciously beaten and, in some instances, killed — offences that the Constabulary classified as 'outrages'. Catholic clergymen regularly denounced the Mollies and in 1853, the district was proclaimed under the Crime and Outrage (Ireland) Act. Yet the 'outrages' continued. Then, in 1856, Patrick McGlynn, a young schoolmaster, suddenly turned informer on the Mollies, precipitating dozens of arrests. Here, a history of McGlynn's informing, backlit by episodes over the previous two decades, sheds light on that wave of outrage, its origins and outcomes, the meaning and the memory of it. More specifically, it illuminates the end of 'outrage' — the shifting objectives of those who engaged in it, and also how, after hunger faded and disease abated, tensions emerged in the Molly Maguires, when one element sought to curtail such activity, while another sought, unsuccessfully, to expand it. And in that contention, when the opportunities of post-Famine society were coming into view, one glimpses the end, or at least an ebbing, of outrage — in the everyday sense of moral indignation — at the fate of the rural poor. But, at heart, The End of Outrage is about contention among neighbours — a family that rose from the ashes of a mode of living, those consumed in the conflagration, and those who lost much but not all. Ultimately, the concern is how the poor themselves came to terms with their loss: how their own outrage at what had been done unto them and their forbears lost malignancy, and eventually ended. The author being a native of the small community that is the focus of The End of Outrage makes it an extraordinarily intimate and absorbing history.

The Iveragh Peninsula

a cultural atlas of the Ring of Kerry

Author: John Crowley,John Sheehan

Publisher: Cork Univ Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 495

View: 1187

* The Ring of Kerry is one of Ireland's most beloved of landscapes * This multidisciplinary exploration will make anyone's visit to the Ring even more magical The Iveragh Peninsula, often referred to as the 'Ring of Kerry', is one of Ireland's most dramatic and beautiful landscapes. This cultural atlas, comprising over fifty individual chapters and case studies, provides the reader with a broad range of perspectives on the peninsula and the human interactions with it since prehistoric times to the present day. Although not a conventional atlas, it contains many historic and newly commissioned maps. The opening chapters explore the physical and environmental setting of the peninsula. Subsequent chapters deal with is development over the millennia and the influences that have shaped it. All aspects of Iveragh's past and present are considered, using the evidence of disciplines such as archaeology, art history, cartography, folklore, geography, geology, history, mythology and zoology. Given its status as a peninsula projecting into the Atlantic, the history and culture of the Iveragh Peninsula have been molded by external influences as well as by regional and national ones. Its story is multi-layered, involving the imprint of mythological as well as historic settlers and invaders. The peninsula has witnessed significant periods of transition, perhaps none more so than in the present era. This book seeks to deepen and illuminate our understanding of its landscape, history and heritage.

An Atlas of Irish History

Author: Ruth Dudley Edwards,Bridget Hourican

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415278591

Category: History

Page: 299

View: 2380

Combining over 100 beautifully crafted maps, charts and graphs with a narrative packed with facts and information, An Atlas of Irish History provides coverage of the main political, military, economic, religious and social changes that have occurred in Ireland and among the Irish abroad over the past two millennia. Ruth Dudley Edwards and Bridget Hourican use the combination of thematic narrative and visual aids to examine and illustrate issues such as: the Viking invasions of Ireland the Irish in Britain pre- and post-famine agriculture population change twentieth-century political affiliations. This third edition has been comprehensively revised and updated to include coverage of the many changes that have occurred in Ireland and among its people overseas. Taking into consideration the main issues that have developed since 1981, and adding a number of new maps and graphs, this new edition also includes an informative and detailed section on the troubles that have been a feature of Irish life since 1969. An Atlas of Irish History is an invaluable resource for students of Irish history and politics and the general reader alike.

Atlas of Irish History

Author: Seán Duffy

Publisher: Gill & MacMillan

ISBN: 9780717148905

Category: Atlas / swd

Page: 144

View: 9047

'The Atlas of Irish History' tells the story of the Irish past in graphic cartography, beautifully rendered and augmented by an authoritative text. It is an essential basic reference tool for any student of the Irish past.

The Great Famine

Ireland's Agony 1845-1852

Author: Ciarán Ó Murchadha

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1847252176

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 2295

An engaging and moving account of this most destructive event in Irish history.

The Irish Famine

A Documentary

Author: Colm Toibin,Diarmaid Ferriter

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780756778620

Category: History

Page: 214

View: 918

The Irish Potato Famine of the 1840s has been popularly perceived as a genocide attributable to the British gov't. In professional historical circles, however, such singular thinking was dismissed many years ago. And while British governmental sins of omission & commission during the famine played their part, there is a broader context of land agitation & regional influences of class conflict within Ireland that also contributed to the starvation of more than a million people. This book opens a door to understanding all sides of this tragedy with an absorbing history that is supported by a collection of key documents. An important piece of revisionist that is sure to become the classic primer for this lamentable period of Irish history.

An Historical, Environmental and Cultural Atlas of County Donegal

Author: Jim Mac Laughlin,Seán Beattie

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781859184943

Category: History

Page: 619

View: 6470

After decades of neglect--and indeed misrepresentation--this atlas seeks to put Donegal on the map of contemporary Ireland. Contributors are drawn from a wide range of academic disciplines and interests, including established authors and academics as well as competent local scholars whose work merits publication. The editors, who have also contributed very substantially to the volume, have sought to raise the bar in regional studies in order to set a high standard of scholarship and writing, to make this a volume that will be consulted by those interested in the history and heritage of the county for many years to come. This richly illustrated atlas also has a very strong heritage focus in that the historic, archaeological, natural landscapes and the built environment of the county are treated as powerful elements of Donegal's cultural heritage. Thus topics include historic and recent emigration, Gaelic language and literature, musical traditions, the marine environment, fishing and the coastal economy, textile industries, the history of tourism and travel, art and architecture, Ulster Scots and Donegal's Presbyterian community, material culture, farming, the history of rail, newspapers, sports, the natural and physical landscape and urban-rural relations.

Ancient Light

Author: John Banville

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307960838

Category: Fiction

Page: 304

View: 6666

The Man Booker Prize-winning author of The Sea gives us a brilliant, profoundly moving new novel about an actor in the twilight of his life and his career: a meditation on love and loss, and on the inscrutable immediacy of the past in our present lives. Is there any difference between memory and invention? That is the question that fuels this stunning novel, written with the depth of character, the clarifying lyricism and the sly humor that have marked all of John Banville’s extraordinary works. And it is the question that haunts Alexander Cleave, an actor in the twilight of his career and of his life, as he plumbs the memories of his first—and perhaps only—love (he, fifteen years old, the woman more than twice his age, the mother of his best friend; the situation impossible, thrilling, devouring and finally devastating) . . . and of his daughter, lost to a kind of madness of mind and heart that Cleave can only fail to understand. When his dormant acting career is suddenly, inexplicably revived with a movie role portraying a man who may not be who he says he is, his young leading lady—famous and fragile—unwittingly gives him the opportunity to see with aching clarity the “chasm that yawns between the doing of a thing and the recollection of what was done.” Ancient Light is a profoundly moving meditation on love and loss, on the inscrutable immediacy of the past in our present lives, on how invention shapes memory and memory shapes the man. It is a book of spellbinding power and pathos from one of the greatest masters of prose at work today. This eBook edition includes a Reading Group Guide.

The Great Irish Famine

A History in Four Lives

Author: Enda Delaney

Publisher: Gill Books

ISBN: 9780717160105

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 5272

The Great Irish Famine tells of the last great famine in European history. First-hand accounts and writings by four contemporary real people are used to give a complete and personal picture of the historic tragedy.

The Hook Peninsula

County Wexford

Author: Billy Colfer

Publisher: Cork University Press

ISBN: 1859183786

Category: Architecture

Page: 242

View: 6056

"The Hook Peninsula continues the Irish Rural Landscape series, building on the research agenda established by the internationally successful Atlas of the Irish Rural Landscape. Located in county Wexford, this region was the first to be conquered by the Anglo-Normans and its landscape was shaped by the establishment of two Cistercian abbeys (Tintern and Dunbrody) in the Middle Ages. The location of the peninsula beside a major estuary and busy shipping lanes was of vital importance. The Hook figured prominently in the Confederate Wars in the seventeenth century and in the 1798 rebellion." "This compact and highly distinctive peninsula makes for a compelling case-study in which Billy Colfer carefully knits the local story into a wider narrative. An eye for detail and an intuitive understanding of his local community creates a vivid story, while Colfer's obvious love for the Hook infuses the volume with an underlying passion all the more moving for being understated. Ireland, 'an island nation', has at last a volume informed by a maritime perspective from a writer who understands the sea and its formative influence on landscapes and lives. In these beautiful pages, an astonishing array of maps, photographs, paintings, archive sketches and new drawings ensure that the Hook landscape is given a radiant treatment."--BOOK JACKET.

ATLAS & CYCLOPEDIA OF IRELAND

Author: P. W. (Patrick Weston) 1827-1914 Joyce,A. M. (Alexander Martin) 1830 Sullivan,P. D. Nunan

Publisher: Wentworth Press

ISBN: 9781360451695

Category: History

Page: 722

View: 6865

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