American Capitalism

The Concept of Countervailing Power

Author: John Galbraith

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351532863

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 208

View: 9000

In his new introduction to this classic text on political economy, Galbraith reasserts the validity of the core thesis of American Capitalism: The best and established answer to economic power is the building of countervailing power. The trade union remains an equalizing force in the labor markets, and the chain store is the best answer to the market power of big food companies. This work remains an essential guidepost of American mores as well as that as of the American economy.

Mein Leben für die Wirtschaft

Die Autobiografie

Author: Alan Greenspan

Publisher: Campus Verlag

ISBN: 3593384094

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 598

View: 5059

Alan Greenspan ist der bekannteste Banker der Welt. 18 Jahre lang war er als Vorsitzender der amerikanischen Notenbank der mächtigste Mann der Weltwirtschaft – und damit vermutlich mächtiger als der amerikanische Präsident. Niemand verfügt über tiefere Einsichten in die globale Wirtschaft als Greenspan. Jetzt berichtet er erstmals von seinen faszinierenden Erfahrungen und sagt uns, wie sich die Weltwirtschaft entwickeln wird.

Chosen Capital

The Jewish Encounter with American Capitalism

Author: Rebecca Kobrin

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813553296

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 5190

At which moments and in which ways did Jews play a central role in the development of American capitalism? Many popular writers address the intersection of Jews and capitalism, but few scholars, perhaps fearing this question’s anti-Semitic overtones, have pondered it openly. Chosen Capital represents the first historical collection devoted to this question in its analysis of the ways in which Jews in North America shaped and were shaped by America’s particular system of capitalism. Jews fundamentally molded aspects of the economy during the century when American capital was being redefined by industrialization, war, migration, and the emergence of the United States as a superpower. Surveying such diverse topics as Jews’ participation in the real estate industry, the liquor industry, and the scrap metal industry, as well as Jewish political groups and unions bent on reforming American capital, such as the American Labor Party and the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union, contributors to this volume provide a new prism through which to view the Jewish encounter with America. The volume also lays bare how American capitalism reshaped Judaism itself by encouraging the mass manufacturing and distribution of foods like matzah and the transformation of synagogue cantors into recording stars. These essays force us to rethink not only the role Jews played in American economic development but also how capitalism has shaped Jewish life and Judaism over the course of the twentieth century. Contributors: Marni Davis, Georgia State University Phyllis Dillon, independent documentary producer, textile conservator, museum curator Andrew Dolkart, Columbia University Andrew Godley, Henley Business School, University of Reading Jonathan Karp, executive director, American Jewish Historical Society Daniel Katz, Empire State College, State University of New York Ira Katznelson, Columbia University David S. Koffman, New York University Eli Lederhendler, Hebrew University, Jerusalem Jonathan Z. S. Pollack, University of Wisconsin—Madison Jonathan D. Sarma, Brandeis University Jeffrey Shandler, Rutgers University Daniel Soyer, Fordham University

The Agrarian Origins of American Capitalism

Author: Allan Kulikoff

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813914206

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 341

View: 3764

Allan Kulikoff's book aims to trace the rural origins and growth of capitalism in America, challenging earlier scholarship and aiming to chart a new course for future studies in history and economics. Kulikoff argues that long before the explosive growth of cities and big factories, capitalism in the countryside changes our society - the ties between men and women, the relations between different social classes, the rhetoric of the yeomanry, slave migration and frontier settlement.

American Capitalism

Social Thought and Political Economy in the Twentieth Century

Author: Nelson Lichtenstein

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812202635

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 392

View: 6228

At the dawn of the twenty-first century, the legitimacy of American capitalism seems unchallenged. The link between open markets, economic growth, and democratic success has become common wisdom, not only among policy makers but for many intellectuals as well. In this instance, however, the past has hardly been prologue to contemporary confidence in the free market. American Capitalism presents thirteen thought-provoking essays that explain how a variety of individuals, many prominent intellectuals but others partisans in the combative world of business and policy, engaged with anxieties about the seismic economic changes in postwar America and, in the process, reconfigured the early twentieth-century ideology that put critique of economic power and privilege at its center. The essays consider a broad spectrum of figures—from C. L. R. James and John Kenneth Galbraith to Peter Drucker and Ayn Rand—and topics ranging from theories of Cold War "convergence" to the rise of the philanthropic Right. They examine how the shift away from political economy at midcentury paved the way for the 1960s and the "culture wars" that followed. Contributors interrogate what was lost and gained when intellectuals moved their focus from political economy to cultural criticism. The volume thereby offers a blueprint for a dramatic reevaluation of how we should think about the trajectory of American intellectual history in twentieth-century United States.

The Rise of American Capitalism

The Growth of American Banks

Author: J. T. Moriarty

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc

ISBN: 9780823940226

Category: History

Page: 32

View: 6721

Examines the economic history of the United States, from the paper money issued during the American Revolution through the rise of big business after the Civil War, and the effort to create a stable monetary system.

American Capitalism

New Histories

Author: Sven Beckert,Christine Desan

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231546068

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 432

View: 7918

The United States has long epitomized capitalism. From its enterprising shopkeepers, wildcat banks, violent slave plantations, huge industrial working class, and raucous commodities trade to its world-spanning multinationals, its massive factories, and the centripetal power of New York in the world of finance, America has come to symbolize capitalism for two centuries and more. But an understanding of the history of American capitalism is as elusive as it is urgent. What does it mean to make capitalism a subject of historical inquiry? What is its potential across multiple disciplines, alongside different methodologies, and in a range of geographic and chronological settings? And how does a focus on capitalism change our understanding of American history? American Capitalism presents a sampling of cutting-edge research from prominent scholars. These broad-minded and rigorous essays venture new angles on finance, debt, and credit; women’s rights; slavery and political economy; the racialization of capitalism; labor beyond industrial wage workers; and the production of knowledge, including the idea of the economy, among other topics. Together, the essays suggest emerging themes in the field: a fascination with capitalism as it is made by political authority, how it is claimed and contested by participants, how it spreads across the globe, and how it can be reconceptualized without being universalized. A major statement for a wide-open field, this book demonstrates the breadth and scope of the work that the history of capitalism can provoke.

The Corporate Reconstruction of American Capitalism, 1890-1916

The Market, the Law, and Politics

Author: Martin J. Sklar

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521313827

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 484

View: 4901

At the turn of the twentieth century American politics underwent a profound change, as both regulatory minimalism and statist command were rejected in favor of positive government engaged in both regulatory and distributive roles. Through a fresh examination of the judicial, legislative, and political aspects of the antitrust debates in the years from 1890-1916, Martin Sklar shows that the arguments did not arise simply because of competition versus combination, but because of the larger question of the proper relations between government and the market and between state and society.

American Capitalism

A Reader

Author: Louis Hyman,Edward E. Baptist

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501171305

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 464

View: 2016

From Cornell University Professors Louis Hyman and Edward E. Baptist, a collection of the most relevant readings on the history of capitalism in America, created to accompany their EdX course "American Capitalism: A Reader." To understand the past and especially our own times, arguably no story is as essential to get right as the history of capitalism. Nearly all of our theories about promoting progress come from how we interpret the economic changes of the last 500 years. This past decade's crises continue to remind us just how much capitalism changes, even as basic features like wage labor, financial markets, private property, and entrepreneurs endure. While capitalism has a global history, the United States plays a special role in that story. "American Capitalism: A Reader" will help you to understand how the United States became the world's leading economic power, while revealing essential lessons about what has been and what will be possible in capitalism's ongoing revolution. Combining a wealth of essential readings, introductions by Professors Baptist and Hyman, and questions to help guide readers through the materials and broader subject, this course reader will prepare students to think critically about the history of capitalism in America.

Can American Capitalism Survive?

Why Greed Is Not Good, Opportunity Is Not Equal, and Fairness Won't Make Us Poor

Author: Steven Pearlstein

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1250185998

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 224

View: 3427

"If anyone can save capitalism from the capitalists, it’s Steven Pearlstein. This lucid, brilliant book refuses to abandon capitalism to those who believe morality and justice irrelevant to an economic system." —Ezra Klein, founder and editor-at-large, Vox Pulitzer Prize-winning economics journalist Steven Pearlstein argues that our thirty year experiment in unfettered markets has undermined core values required to make capitalism and democracy work. Thirty years ago, “greed is good” and “maximizing shareholder value” became the new mantras woven into the fabric of our business culture, economy, and politics. Although, around the world, free market capitalism has lifted more than a billion people from poverty, in the United States most of the benefits of economic growth have been captured by the richest 10%, along with providing justification for squeezing workers, cheating customers, avoiding taxes, and leaving communities in the lurch. As a result, Americans are losing faith that a free market economy is the best system. In Can American Capitalism Survive?, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Steven Pearlstein chronicles our descent and challenges the theories being taught in business schools and exercised in boardrooms around the country. We’re missing a key tenet of Adam Smith’s wealth of nations: without trust and social capital, democratic capitalism cannot survive. Further, equality of incomes and opportunity need not come at the expense of economic growth. Pearlstein lays out bold steps we can take as a country: a guaranteed minimum income paired with universal national service, tax incentives for companies to share profits with workers, ending class segregation in public education, and restoring competition to markets. He provides a path forward that will create the shared prosperity that will sustain capitalism over the long term.

The Psychopathology of American Capitalism

Author: Thomas Paul Bonfiglio

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319555928

Category: Political Science

Page: 296

View: 3843

This book synthesizes psychoanalytic and Marxist techniques in order to illuminate the resistance to a socialization of the American economy, the protectionist discourses of anomalous American capitalism, and the suppression of the capitalist welfare state. After the Second World War, Democrats and Republicans effectively eliminated the communist and socialist parties from the American political spectrum and suppressed their allied labor movements. The right-wing shift of both parties fabricated a false opposition of left and right that does not correspond to political oppositions in the industrialized democracies. Marxist perspectives can account for the massive inequality of the political economy, but they are insufficient for illuminating its preservation. Psychoanalysis is necessary in order to explain why Americans continue to vote within a two-party system that neglects the lower classes, and why the working class tends to vote against its own interests. The psychoanalytic techniques employed include doubling, repetition, displacement, condensation, inversion, denial, fetishizing, and cognitive repression. In examining the fixation upon the proxy binary of Democrat vs. Republican, which suppresses the true opposition of left vs. right and neutralizes alternatives, the work analyses numerous contemporary political issues through applications of Marxist psychoanalytic theory.

The Archaeology of American Capitalism

Author: Christopher N. Matthews

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813044163

Category: History

Page: 255

View: 4833

From the publisher. Drawing on archaeological evidence from the colonial period to the modern era and covering sites from New England to California, The Archaeology of American Capitalism is the first comparative treatment in historical archaeology to comprehensively illustrate the development of capitalism in the United States. Included are studies on European-Indian relations, early colonial culture change, urbanization, mass consumption, and heritage tourism that track the emergence to dominance of capitalist social relations. In this wide-ranging and compelling study, Christopher Matthews unravels the complexities of the material construction of individuals as commodities, the orientation of social life to the market, and grassroots resistance to capitalist culture. Perhaps most intriguing, he identifies the discipline of archaeology itself as an artifact of capitalism and offers a thoughtful investigation into the ways in which the transformative effects of capitalism not only determine much of the archaeological record but the pursuit of archaeology itself.

The Business of Slavery and the Rise of American Capitalism, 1815-1860

Author: Jack Lawrence Schermerhorn,Calvin Schermerhorn

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300192002

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 352

View: 5270

Calvin Schermerhorn's provocative study views the development of modern American capitalism through the window of the nineteenth-century interstate slave trade. This eye-opening history follows money and ships as well as enslaved human beings to demonstrate how slavery was a national business supported by far-flung monetary and credit systems reaching across the Atlantic Ocean. The author details the anatomy of slave supply chains and the chains of credit and commodities that intersected with them in virtually every corner of the pre–Civil War United States, and explores how an institution that destroyed lives and families contributed greatly to the growth of the expanding republic's capitalist economy.

Irrationaler Überschwang

Author: Robert J. Shiller

Publisher: Plassen Verlag

ISBN: 386470264X

Category: Political Science

Page: 432

View: 8126

Er hat die Technologieblase vorhergesagt und vor der Immobilienblase warnte er ebenfalls frühzeitig. Nun analysiert Wirtschafts-Nobelpreisträger Robert Shiller die aktuelle Situation an den Finanzmärkten – und warnt erneut. Mit seiner Theorie des "Irrationalen Überschwangs" zeigt Nobelpreisträger Robert Shiller, dass Euphorie seitens der Akteure die Märkte auf unhaltbare und gefährliche Niveaus treiben kann. So geschehen in den Jahren 2000 bei der Hightechblase und 2007/2008 bei der Subprimeblase, die Shiller präzise vorhergesagt hat. Dies ist die dritte, aktualisierte und erweiterte Auflage seines Klassikers. Shiller bezieht hier erstmals auch den Anleihenmarkt ein und gibt Empfehlungen, was die Individuen und die Politik im Lichte der aktuellen Situation an den Finanzmärkten tun sollten.

The Long Gilded Age

American Capitalism and the Lessons of a New World Order

Author: Leon Fink

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812292030

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 6620

From the end of the nineteenth century through the first decades of the twentieth, the United States experienced unprecedented structural change. Advances in communication and manufacturing technology brought about a revolution for major industries such as railroads, coal, and steel. The still-growing nation established economic, political, and cultural entanglements with forces overseas. Local strikes in manufacturing, urban transit, and construction placed labor issues front and center in political campaigns, legislative corridors, church pulpits, and newspapers of the era. The Long Gilded Age considers the interlocking roles of politics, labor, and internationalism in the ideologies and institutions that emerged at the turn of the twentieth century. Presenting a new twist on central themes of American labor and working-class history, Leon Fink examines how the American conceptualization of free labor played out in iconic industrial strikes, and how "freedom" in the workplace became overwhelmingly tilted toward individual property rights at the expense of larger community standards. He investigates the legal and intellectual centers of progressive thought, situating American policy actions within an international context. In particular, he traces the development of American socialism, which appealed to a young generation by virtue of its very un-American roots and influences. The Long Gilded Age offers both a transnational and comparative look at a formative era in American political development, placing this tumultuous period within a worldwide confrontation between the capitalist marketplace and social transformation.