Aftermath

France, Germany, Austria, Yugoslavia, 1945 and 1946

Author: Francesca M. Wilson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: World War, 1939-1945

Page: 253

View: 1742


Missing

Persons and Politics

Author: Jenny Edkins

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801462800

Category: Political Science

Page: 296

View: 4237

Stories of the missing offer profound insights into the tension between how political systems see us and how we see each other. The search for people who go missing as a result of war, political violence, genocide, or natural disaster reveals how forms of governance that objectify the person are challenged. Contemporary political systems treat persons instrumentally, as objects to be administered rather than as singular beings: the apparatus of government recognizes categories, not people. In contrast, relatives of the missing demand that authorities focus on a particular person: families and friends are looking for someone who to them is unique and irreplaceable. In Missing, Jenny Edkins highlights stories from a range of circumstances that shed light on this critical tension: the aftermath of World War II, when millions in Europe were displaced; the period following the fall of the World Trade Center towers in Manhattan in 2001 and the bombings in London in 2005; searches for military personnel missing in action; the thousands of political "disappearances" in Latin America; and in more quotidian circumstances where people walk out on their families and disappear of their own volition. When someone goes missing we often find that we didn't know them as well as we thought: there is a sense in which we are "missing" even to our nearest and dearest and even when we are present, not absent. In this thought-provoking book, Edkins investigates what this more profound "missingness" might mean in political terms.

The Bitter Road to Freedom

A New History of the Liberation of Europe

Author: William I. Hitchcock

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0743273818

Category: History

Page: 446

View: 5329

A revisionist account of the liberation of Europe in World War II from the perspectives of Europeans offers insight into the more complicated aspects of the occupation, the cultural differences between Europeans and Americans, and their perspectives on the moral implications of military action. 75,000 first printing.

Goodbye to All That?

The Story of Europe Since 1945

Author: Dan Stone

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019969771X

Category: History

Page: 379

View: 8777

This is the story of Europe's emergence from the catastrophe of fascism and world war in the years after 1945 - and how the broad anti-fascist consensus on which this was based has ominously unravelled in recent decades. Essential reading for all those interested in the history of Europe in the twentieth century - and in the question of where Europe is heading in the twenty-first century.

In War's Wake

Europe's Displaced Persons in the Postwar Order

Author: Gerard Daniel Cohen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199912211

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 940

After WWII, Europe was awash in refugees. Never in modern times had so many been so destitute and displaced. No longer subjects of a single nation-state, this motley group of enemies and victims consisted of Jewish survivors of the Holocaust, ex-Soviet POWs, ex-forced laborers in the Third Reich, legions of people who fled the advancing Red Army, and many thousands uprooted by the sheer violence of the war. This book argues that postwar international relief operations went beyond their stated goal of civilian "rehabilitation" and contributed to the rise of a new internationalism, setting the terms on which future displaced persons would be treated by nations and NGOs.

Outcast Europe

Refugees and Relief Workers in an Era of Total War 1936-48

Author: Sharif Gemie,Laure Humbert,Fiona Reid

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1441142134

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 3935

The period of the 'long' Second World War (1936-1948) was marked by mass movements of diverse populations: 60 million people either fled or were forced from their homes. This book considers the Spanish Republicans fleeing Franco's Spain in 1939, the French civilians trying to escape the Nazi invasion in 1940, and the millions of people displaced or expelled by the forces of Hitler's Third Reich. Throughout this period state and voluntary organisations were created to take care of the homeless and the displaced. National organisations dominated until the end of the war; afterwards, international organisations - the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Agency and the International Refugee Organisation - were formed to deal with what was clearly an international problem. Using case studies of displaced people and of relief workers, this book is unique in placing such crises at the centre rather than the margins of wartime experience, making the work nothing less than an alternative history of the Second World War.

The Collapse of the Third Republic

An Inquiry into the Fall of France in 1940

Author: William L. Shirer

Publisher: Rosetta Books

ISBN: 0795342470

Category: History

Page: 1010

View: 2312

An acclaimed historian unfolds a monumental, eyewitness page-turner on the tragic fall of France to Hitler’s Third Reich at the outset of WWII. As an international war correspondent and radio commentator, William L. Shirer didn’t just research the fall of France. He was there. In just six weeks, he watched the Third Reich topple one of the world’s oldest military powers—and institute a rule of terror and paranoia. Based on in-person conversation with the leaders, diplomats, generals, and ordinary citizens who both shaped the events of this time and lived through them on a daily basis, Shirer shapes a compelling account of historical events—without losing sight of the personal experience. From the heroic efforts of the Freedom Fighters to the tactical military misjudgments that caused the fall and the daily realities of life for French citizens under Nazi rule, this fascinating and exhaustively documented account from one of the twentieth Century’s most important historians makes the events of the fall accessible to a younger audience in vivid and memorable style.

Pattern and Repertoire in History

Author: Bertrand M. ROEHNER,Tony Syme,Bertrand M Roehner

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674042840

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 8476

The aim of this book is to analyze clusters of similar "elementary" occurrences that serve as the building blocks of more global events. Making connections between seemingly unrelated case studies, Roehner and Syme apply scientific methodology to the analysis of history. Their book identifies the recurring patterns of behavior that shape the histories of different countries separated by vast stretches of time and space. Taking advantage of a broad wealth of historical evidence, the authors decipher what may be seen as a kind of genetic code of history.

Spoils of War

Author: E Simpson,Elizabeth Simpson

Publisher: Harry N. Abrams

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 1259

Features records of a 1995 symposium on ownership of lost or stolen property during World War II

A Diplomatic Revolution

Algeria's Fight for Independence and the Origins of the Post-Cold War Era

Author: Matthew Connelly

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199881804

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 2322

Algeria sits at the crossroads of the Atlantic, European, Arab, and African worlds. Yet, unlike the wars in Korea and Vietnam, Algeria's fight for independence has rarely been viewed as an international conflict. Even forty years later, it is remembered as the scene of a national drama that culminated with Charles de Gaulle's decision to "grant" Algerians their independence despite assassination attempts, mutinies, and settler insurrection. Yet, as Matthew Connelly demonstrates, the war the Algerians fought occupied a world stage, one in which the U.S. and the USSR, Israel and Egypt, Great Britain, Germany, and China all played key roles. Recognizing the futility of confronting France in a purely military struggle, the Front de Lib?ration Nationale instead sought to exploit the Cold War competition and regional rivalries, the spread of mass communications and emigrant communities, and the proliferation of international and non-governmental organizations. By harnessing the forces of nascent globalization they divided France internally and isolated it from the world community. And, by winning rights and recognition as Algeria's legitimate rulers without actually liberating the national territory, they rewrote the rules of international relations. Based on research spanning three continents and including, for the first time, the rebels' own archives, this study offers a landmark reevaluation of one of the great anti-colonial struggles as well as a model of the new international history. It will appeal to historians of post-colonial studies, twentieth-century diplomacy, Europe, Africa, and the Middle East. A Diplomatic Revolution was winner of the 2003 Stuart L. Bernath Prize of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations, and the Akira Iriye International History Book Award, The Foundation for Pacific Quest.

Hamilton's Paradox

The Promise and Peril of Fiscal Federalism

Author: Jonathan Rodden

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521603669

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 313

View: 6259

As new federations take shape and old ones are revived around the world, a difficult challenge is to create incentives for fiscal discipline. By combining theory, quantitative analysis, and historical and contemporary case studies, this book lays out the first systematic explanation of why decentralized countries have had dramatically different fiscal experiences. It provides insights into current policy debates from Latin America to the European Union, and a new perspective on a tension between the promise and peril of federalism that has characterized the literature since The Federalist Papers.

Austrian Lives

Author: Günter Bischof

Publisher: innsbruck University Press

ISBN: 3903122351

Category: History

Page: 490

View: 2213

Writing biographies (life stories) for a long time had been a male hegemonic project-writing the lives of great (white) men. Ever since Plutarch and Sueton composed their vitae of the greats of classical antiquity, to the medieval obsession with the hagiographies of holy men (and a few women) and saints, Vasari's lives of great Renaissance artists, down to the French encyclopedists, Dr. Johnson and Lytton Strachey, as well as Ranke and Droysen the genre of biographical writing (“the representation of self ” or “the reconstruction of a human life”) has become increasingly more refined. In the twentieth century male predominance has become contested and the (collective) lives of women, minorities and ordinary people are now the focus of biographical writing. This volume of Contemporary Austrian Studies offers a cross section of Austrian lives and biographical approaches to recent Austrian history. Here are what may be called traditional biographies of leading political figures through the twentieth century. We also suggest that the intellectual biographies (lives of the mind) of thinkers and professionals are fertile soil for biographical study. Moreover, the prosopographic study of common folks in the Austrian population lifts these lives from the dark matter of anonymous masses and gives rich insights into the lives ordinary Austrians have been leading.

Reconciliation, Civil Society, and the Politics of Memory

Transnational Initiatives in the 20th and 21st Century

Author: Birgit Schwelling

Publisher: transcript Verlag

ISBN: 383941931X

Category: Philosophy

Page: 372

View: 9083

How did civil society function as a locus for reconciliation initiatives since the beginning of the 20th century? The essays in this volume challenge the conventional understanding of reconciliation as a benign state-driven process. They explore how a range of civil society actors - from Turkish intellectuals apologizing for the Armenian Genocide to religious organizations working towards the improvement of Franco-German relations - have confronted and coped with the past. These studies offer a critical perspective on local and transnational reconciliation acts by questioning the extent to which speech became an alternative to silence, remembrance to forgetting, engagement to oblivion.

Peacemakers Six Months that Changed The World

Author: Margaret MacMillan

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1848546688

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 2071

After the war to end all wars, men and women from all over the world converged on Paris for the Peace Conference. At its heart were the three great powers - Woodrow Wilson, Lloyd George and Clemenceau - but thousands of others came too, each with a different agenda. Kings, prime ministers and foreign ministers with their crowds of advisers rubbed shoulders with journalists and lobbyists for a hundred causes, from Armenian independence to women's rights. Everyone had business that year - T.E. Lawrence, Queen Marie of Romania, Maynard Keynes, Ho Chi Minh. There had never been anything like it before, and there never has been since. For six extraordinary months the city was effectively the centre of world government as the peacemakers wound up bankrupt empires and created new countries. This book brings to life the personalities, ideals and prejudices of the men who shaped the settlement. They pushed Russia to the sidelines, alienated China and dismissed the Arabs, struggled with the problems of Kosovo, or the Kurds, and of a homeland for the Jews. The peacemakers, it has been said, failed dismally, and above all failed to prevent another war. Margaret MacMillan argues that they have been made scapegoats for the mistakes of those who came later. They tried to be evenhanded, but their goals could never in fact be achieved by diplomacy.

The Last Utopia

Author: Samuel Moyn

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674058542

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 5600

Human rights offer a vision of international justice that today’s idealistic millions hold dear. Yet the very concept on which the movement is based became familiar only a few decades ago when it profoundly reshaped our hopes for an improved humanity. In this pioneering book, Samuel Moyn elevates that extraordinary transformation to center stage and asks what it reveals about the ideal’s troubled present and uncertain future.

Slovenia 1945

Memories of Death and Survival After World War II

Author: John Corsellis,Marcus Ferrar

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 1848855346

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 4459

One of the most moving and tragic diaspora stories of WWII, "Slovenia 1945" follows the fate of a strongly Catholic and non-Communist community in Slovenia, including members of the anti-Communist Home Guard 'domobranci', caught up in the maelstrom of war and politics in the Balkans in WWII and the problems of the post-war settlement. Thousands were returned to face death and exile at the hands of their war-time enemies - Tito's Partisans - who had triumphed by the war's end. Yet the story of exile is also one of triumph as the surviving refugees built new lives in Argentina, the USA, Canada and Britain. The authors call on more than half a century of research and an unsurpassed knowledge of the Slovene migrant communities around the world to tell their stories.