African Fractals

Modern Computing and Indigenous Design

Author: Ron Eglash

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813526140

Category: Mathematics

Page: 258

View: 3891

Fractals are characterized by the repetition of similar patterns at ever-diminishing scales. Fractal geometry has emerged as one of the most exciting frontiers on the border between mathematics and information technology and can be seen in many of the swirling patterns produced by computer graphics. It has become a new tool for modeling in biology, geology, and other natural sciences. Anthropologists have observed that the patterns produced in different cultures can be characterized by specific design themes. In Europe and America, we often see cities laid out in a grid pattern of straight streets and right-angle corners. In contrast, traditional African settlements tend to use fractal structures-circles of circles of circular dwellings, rectangular walls enclosing ever-smaller rectangles, and streets in which broad avenues branch down to tiny footpaths with striking geometric repetition. These indigenous fractals are not limited to architecture; their recursive patterns echo throughout many disparate African designs and knowledge systems. Drawing on interviews with African designers, artists, and scientists, Ron Eglash investigates fractals in African architecture, traditional hairstyling, textiles, sculpture, painting, carving, metalwork, religion, games, practical craft, quantitative techniques, and symbolic systems. He also examines the political and social implications of the existence of African fractal geometry. His book makes a unique contribution to the study of mathematics, African culture, anthropology, and computer simulations.

African Fractals

Modern Computing and Indigenous Design

Author: Ron Eglash

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813526133

Category: Mathematics

Page: 258

View: 3037

Fractals are characterized by the repetition of similar patterns at ever-diminishing scales. Fractal geometry has emerged as one of the most exciting frontiers on the border between mathematics and information technology and can be seen in many of the swirling patterns produced by computer graphics. It has become a new tool for modeling in biology, geology, and other natural sciences. Anthropologists have observed that the patterns produced in different cultures can be characterized by specific design themes. In Europe and America, we often see cities laid out in a grid pattern of straight streets and right-angle corners. In contrast, traditional African settlements tend to use fractal structures-circles of circles of circular dwellings, rectangular walls enclosing ever-smaller rectangles, and streets in which broad avenues branch down to tiny footpaths with striking geometric repetition. These indigenous fractals are not limited to architecture; their recursive patterns echo throughout many disparate African designs and knowledge systems. Drawing on interviews with African designers, artists, and scientists, Ron Eglash investigates fractals in African architecture, traditional hairstyling, textiles, sculpture, painting, carving, metalwork, religion, games, practical craft, quantitative techniques, and symbolic systems. He also examines the political and social implications of the existence of African fractal geometry. His book makes a unique contribution to the study of mathematics, African culture, anthropology, and computer simulations.

Africa Counts

Number and Pattern in African Cultures

Author: Claudia Zaslavsky

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 1613741154

Category: Mathematics

Page: 368

View: 4001

This fascinating study of mathematical thinking among sub-Saharan African peoples covers counting in words and in gestures; measuring time, distance, weight, and other quantities; manipulating money and keeping accounts; number systems; patterns in music, poetry, art, and architecture; and number magic and taboos. African games such as mankala and elaborate versions of tic-tac-toe show how complex this thinking can be. An invaluable resource for students, teachers, and others interested in African cultures and multiculturalism, this third edition is updated with an introduction covering two decades of new research in the ethnomathematics of Africa.

African Cosmos

Stellar Arts

Author: Christine Mullen Kreamer

Publisher: Monacelli Press

ISBN: 1580933432

Category: Art

Page: 368

View: 9171

"A groundbreaking scholarly publication, accompanying an exhibition organized by the National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, African Cosmos- Stellar Artsbrings together exceptional works of art, dating from ancient times to the present, and essays by leading scholars and contemporary artists to consider African cultural astronomy- creativity and artistic practice in Africa as it is linked to celestial bodies and atmospheric phenomena. African concepts of the universe are intensely personal, placing human beings in relation to the earth and sky, and with the sun, moon, and stars. At the core of creation myths and the foundation of moral values, celestial bodies are often accorded sacred capacities and are part of the “cosmological map” that allows humans to chart their course through life."

Ethnomathematics

Challenging Eurocentrism in Mathematics Education

Author: Arthur B. Powell,Marilyn Frankenstein

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780791433515

Category: Mathematics

Page: 440

View: 5607

Presents the emerging field of ethnomathematics from a critical perspective, challenging particular ways in which Eurocentrism permeates mathematics education and mathematics in general.

Kuba Textiles and Design

Author: Elizabeth S. Bennett,Niangi Batulukisi

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780981626710

Category: Kuba (African people)

Page: 41

View: 1119

Kuba Textiles and Design is an engaging introduction to one of the most unusual and fascinating of all African arts. The textiles of the Kuba people of the Democratic Republic of Congo are decorated not with human or animal figures, but with astonishing abstract designs. Although the Kuba have been producing these textiles for four hundred years, there is something strikingly modern about their aesthetic. A perfect entry point for casual readers and a gift to collectors hoping to learn more about the pieces they treasure.

Appropriating Technology

Vernacular Science and Social Power

Author: Ron Eglash

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 9780816634279

Category: Science

Page: 401

View: 6929

From the vernacular engineering of Latino car design to environmental analysis among rural women to the production of indigenous herbal cures-groups outside the centers of scientific power persistently defy the notion that they are merely passive recipients of technological products and scientific knowledge. This is the first study of how such "outsiders" reinvent consumer products-often in ways that embody critique, resistance, or outright revolt.Contributors: Richard M. Benjamin, Miami U; Hank Bromley, SUNY, Buffalo; Massimiano Bucchi, U of Trento, Italy; Carmen M. Concepcin, U of Puerto Rico; Virginia Eubanks, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Lisa Gitelman, Catholic U; David Albert Mhadi Goldberg, California College of Arts and Crafts; Samuel M. Hampton; Michael K. Heiman, Dickinson College; Linda Price King; Valerie Kuletz; Lisa Jean Moore, College of Staten Island, CUNY; Brian Martin Murphy, Niagra U; Paul Rosen, U of York; Michael Scarce, Peter Taylor, U of Massachusetts, Boston; Turtle Heart.Ron Eglash is assistant professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Jennifer Croissant is associate professor at the University of California. Giovanna Di Chiro is assistant professor at Allegheny College. Rayvon Fouch is assistant professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

African Oral Literature

Backgrounds, Character, and Continuity

Author: Isidore Okpewho

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253207104

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 392

View: 4773

"... its pages come alive with wonderful illustrative material coupled with sensitve and insightful commentary." —Reviews in Anthropology "... the scope, breadth, and lucidity of this excellent study confirm that Okpewho is undoubtedly the most important authority writing on African oral literature right now... "Â —Research in African Literatures "Truly a tour de force of individual scholarship... "Â —World Literature Today "... excellent... " —African Affairs "... a thorough synthesis of the main issues of oral literature criticism, as well as a grounding in experienced fieldwork, a wide-ranging theoretical base, and a clarity of argument rare among academics."Â —Multicultural Review "This is a breathtakingly ambitious project... "Â —Harold Scheub "... a definitive accounting of the evidence of living oral traditions in Africa today. Professor Okpewho's authority as an expert in this important new field is unrivaled." —Gregory Nagy "Isidore Okpewho's ÂAfrican Oral Literature is a marvelous piece of scholarship and wide-ranging research. It presents the most comprehensive survey of the field of oral literature in Africa." —Emmanuel Obiechina "... a tour de force of scholarship in which Okpewho casts his net across the African continent, searching for its verbal forms through voluminous recent writings and presents African oral literature in a new voice, proclaiming the literariness of African folklore." —Dan Ben-Amos "This is an outstanding book by a scholar whose work has already influenced how African literature should be conceived.... Professor Okpewho is a scholar with a special talent to nurture scholarship in others. After this work, African literature will never be the same."Â —Mazisi Kunene Isidore Okpewho, for many years Professor of English at the University of Ibadan, is one of the handful of African scholars who has facilitated the growth of African oral literature to its status today as a literary enterprise concerned with the artistic foundations of human culture. This comprehensive critical work firmly establishes oral literature as a landmark of high artistic achievement and situates it within the broader framework of contemporary African culture.

The Mobile Workshop

The Tsetse Fly and African Knowledge Production

Author: Clapperton Chakanetsa Mavhunga

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262345862

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 430

View: 2494

How the presence of the tsetse fly turned the African forest into an open laboratory where African knowledge formed the basis of colonial tsetse control policies.The tsetse fly is a pan-African insect that bites an infective forest animal and ingests blood filled with invisible parasites, which it carries and transmits into cattle and people as it bites them, leading to n'gana (animal trypanosomiasis) and sleeping sickness. In The Mobile Workshop, Clapperton Chakanetsa Mavhunga examines how the presence of the tsetse fly turned the forests of Zimbabwe and southern Africa into an open laboratory where African knowledge formed the basis of colonial tsetse control policies. He traces the pestiferous work that an indefatigable, mobile insect does through its movements, and the work done by humans to control it.Mavhunga's account restores the central role not just of African labor but of African intellect in the production of knowledge about the tsetse fly. He describes how European colonizers built on and beyond this knowledge toward destructive and toxic methods, including cutting down entire forests, forced “prophylactic” resettlement, massive destruction of wild animals, and extensive spraying of organochlorine pesticides. Throughout, Mavhunga uses African terms to describe the African experience, taking vernacular concepts as starting points in writing a narrative of ruzivo (knowledge) rather than viewing Africa through foreign keywords. The tsetse fly became a site of knowledge production—a mobile workshop of pestilence.

Math and Science Across Cultures

Activities and Investigations from the Exploratorium

Author: Maurice Bazin,Modesto Tamez,Exploratorium Teacher Institute (San Francisco, Calif.)

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781565845411

Category: Mathematics

Page: 176

View: 2937

From the creators of the bestselling "The Explorabook" come innovative, hands-on math and science activities of many cultures. With instructions in this book, one can construct a Brazilian carnival instrument, play a peg solitaire game from Madagascar, or count like an Egyptian. Illustrations throughout.

Elementary Algebraic Geometry

Author: Klaus Hulek

Publisher: American Mathematical Soc.

ISBN: 0821829521

Category: Mathematics

Page: 213

View: 2332

This book is a true introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of algebraic geometry. The language is purposefully kept on an elementary level, avoiding sheaf theory and cohomology theory. The introduction of new algebraic concepts is always motivated by a discussion of the corresponding geometric ideas. The main point of the book is to illustrate the interplay between abstract theory and specific examples. The book contains numerous problems that illustrate the general theory. The text is suitable for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students. It contains sufficient material for a one-semester course. The reader should be familiar with the basic concepts of modern algebra. A course in one complex variable would be helpful, but is not necessary.

Math Is a Verb

Activities and Lessons from Cultures Around the World

Author: James Barta,Ron Eglash,Cathy Ann Barkley

Publisher: National

ISBN: 9780873537070

Category: Ethnomathematics

Page: 163

View: 2756

For most people, the word mathematics is a noun. But for many people in different cultures, mathematics is not simply something they learn in school but something they do as an intrinsic part of their everyday lives. This book is a guide for teachers who would like to enhance their mathematics instruction by integrating it with examples and activities from cultures throughout the world. It provides culturally situated examples, each linked to Common Core objectives that show how mathematics can be so much more than a story problem or an exercise in a worksheet with little or no context. The eleven chapters provide a range of activities from around the world that teach students key math concepts while introducing them to a diversity of cultures. For example: In a Mayan village in Guatemala, students use math as a means to increase the traditional corn harvest Traditional symbols stamped on cloth in Ghana spark an exploration of geometry, measurement, and data analysis Embroidery patterns from Bulgaria can help younger students learn about patterns, and introduce older students to fractal geometry Klappenspiel, a popular classroom game in Germany, provides a fun application of probability analysis Each chapter has activities for specific grade bands (K–3, 4–8, and 9–12), and all activities are designed to encourage students to discover connections among math concepts, world cultures, and their own daily lives and communities.

Parallel Worlds

An Anthropologist and a Writer Encounter Africa

Author: Alma Gottlieb,Philip Graham

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226305066

Category: Social Science

Page: 324

View: 1391

This suspenseful and moving memoir of Africa recounts the experiences of Alma Gottlieb, an anthropologist, and Philip Graham, a fiction writer, as they lived in two remote villages in the rain forest of Cote d'Ivoire. With an unusual coupling of first-person narratives, their alternate voices tell a story imbued with sweeping narrative power, humility, and gentle humor. Parallel Worlds is a unique look at Africa, anthropological fieldwork, and the artistic process. "A remarkable look at a remote society [and] an engaging memoir that testifies to a loving partnership . . . compelling."—James Idema, Chicago Tribune

African Mathematics

From Bones to Computers

Author: Abdul Karim Bangura

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN: 0761853480

Category: Education

Page: 220

View: 8488

This comprehensive text on African Mathematics addresses some of the problematic issues in the field, such as attitudes, curriculum development, educational change, academic achievement, standardized and other tests, performance factors, student characteristics, cross-cultural differences and studies, literacy, native speakers, social class and differences, equal education, teaching methods, and more.

And Their Children After Them

The Legacy of Let Us Now Praise Famous Men: James Agee, Walker Evans, and the Rise and Fall of Cotton in the South

Author: Dale Maharidge,Michael Williamson,Carl Mydans

Publisher: Seven Stories Press

ISBN: 9781583226575

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 262

View: 8154

The writer/photographer team Dale Maharidge and Michael Williamson return to the land and families captured in Agee and Evans's inimitable Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, extending the project of conscience and chronicling the traumatic decline of King Cotton. With this continuation of their project, Maharidge and Williamson not only uncover some surprising historical secrets relating to the families and to Agee himself, but also effectively lay to rest Agee's fear that his work, from lack of reverence or resilience, would be but another offence to the humanity of its subjects.

Ethnomathematics

A Multicultural View of Mathematical Ideas

Author: Marcia Ascher

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351449508

Category: Mathematics

Page: 214

View: 2777

In this truly one-of-a-kind book, Ascher introduces the mathematical ideas of people in traditional, or ""small-scale"", cultures often omitted from discussion of mathematics. Topics such as ""Numbers: Words and Symbols"", ""Tracing Graphs in the Sand"", ""The Logic of Kin Relations"", ""Chance and Strategy in Games and Puzzles"", and ""The Organization and Modeling of Space"" are traced in various cultures including the Inuit, Navajo, and Iroquois of North America; the Inca of South America; the Malekula, Warlpiri, Maori, and Caroline Islanders of Oceania, and the Tshokwe, Bushoong, and Kpelle of Africa. As Ascher explores mathematical ideas involving numbers, logic, spatial configuration, and the organization of these into systems and structures, readers gain both a broader understanding and anappreciation for the idease of other peoples.

A Pragmatic Introduction to the Finite Element Method for Thermal and Stress Analysis

With the Matlab Toolkit SOFEA

Author: Petr Krysl

Publisher: World Scientific Publishing Company

ISBN: 9813101814

Category: Science

Page: 292

View: 9749

This textbook provides an accessible and self-contained description of the Galerkin finite element method for the two important models of continuum mechanics, transient heat conduction and elastodynamics, from formulation of the governing equations to implementation in Matlab. The coverage follows an intuitive approach: the salient features of each initial boundary value problem are reviewed, including a thorough description of the boundary conditions; the method of weighted residuals is applied to derive the discrete equations; and clear examples are introduced to illustrate the method.